Crop & Pest Report

Accessibility


| Share

Fungicide Seed Treatments in Wheat (05/06/21)

With over 40% of the spring wheat crop seeded in the state (and some starting to emerge), one may be trying to determine if a fungicide seed treatment promoted better stand establishment, or perhaps if a fungicide seed treatment is needed on kernels that have yet to be seeded.

With over 40% of the spring wheat crop seeded in the state (and some starting to emerge), one may be trying to determine if a fungicide seed treatment promoted better stand establishment, or perhaps if a fungicide seed treatment is needed on kernels that have yet to be seeded. First, fungicide seed treatments are most effective managing seedborne diseases such as loose smut, and can occasionally improve germination in Fusarium infected (scabby) seed lots (depending on severity of infection). Additionally, there are several fungicide seed treatments labeled for suppression of the three primary root rots of wheat in North Dakota (Fusarium root, crown and foot rot, common root rot, and Pythium root rot), and information can be found in PP622 or in the NDSU Extension Pest Management App. You will notice that most labeled seed treatments have more than one mode of action to help manage and suppress diseases that occur as a complex. For example, a field may have multiple root rot pathogens present such as Pythium and Fusarium (Figure 1).  Therefore, it would be necessary to have a fungicide seed treatment with multiple modes of action with one having efficacy on Pythium (such as FRAC 4 or 22) and one having efficacy on Fusarium (such as FRAC 3, 7 or 11).

ppth.friskop.1

Stand Response – Overview of Research conducted from 2003-2020

Beginning in 2014, I have compiled and analyzed data from replicated wheat seed treatment experiments that have been conducted by NDSU personnel. These experiments were primarily conducted at five locations: Carrington, Dickinson, Fargo, Minot, and Mott. I reported findings two years ago and now have updated the data set to include 46 field trials conducted from 2003-2020. Specifically, I have analyzed the difference (stand response) between a fungicide seed treatment and a non-treated control (naked seed).

When combining data from all experiments, an average stand response of 8.4% was observed when a fungicide seed treatment was used (Figure 2, next page). Additionally, 72% of the fungicide seed treatment data points were positive (greater than zero). Given that trials were conducted in vastly different growing regions, the data was divided into east and west regions. Results indicated that the average stand response from a fungicide seed treatment in the west (Dickinson, Minot and Mott) was 9.9% and the east (Carrington and Fargo) was 7.4%. This data indicates that a favorable stand response is generally observed when a fungicide seed treatment is used; however it is difficult to quantify this effect on yield.

PPTH.friskop.2

 

Andrew Friskop

Extension Plant Pathology, Cereal Crops

This site is supported in part by the Crop Protection and Pest Management Program [grant no. 2017-70006-27144/accession 1013592] from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed are those of the website author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

USDA logo

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.