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Dry Edible Bean Rust Continues to Develop (08/13/15)

Frequent dews and warm temperatures continue to provide a favorable environment for rust to develop on dry edible beans.

Dry Edible Bean Rust Continues to Develop

Frequent dews and warm temperatures continue to provide a favorable environment for rust to develop on dry edible beans.  In the last two weeks I have received calls, photos and samples from all over North Dakota and it is clear that rust is widespread throughout the state.  However, severity is highly variable and many fields have no rust (or very little) while some hot spots in some fields are severely infected and will lose yield.  Since the appearance of a new rust race several years ago, it is best to assume that all market classes and all varieties are susceptible to rust. 

Rust can spread quickly when temperatures are relatively warm and heavy dews occur frequently.  It is important to scout for rust until the beans are at growth stage R7 (this is when pintos begin to stripe).  At that stage, there is no benefit to managing rust.

If rust is developing in relatively young beans and are considering a fungicide application, numerous products are available.  Strobilurin fungicides (Aproach, Headline, Quadris, etc.), triazole fungicides (tebuconazole products, Proline, Propulse, etc.) and fungicide premixes containing strobilurin or triazole chemistries are efficacious on dry edible bean rust.

For more details, photographs and links to additional information, please refer to the crop and pest report article ‘Keep an eye out for dry edible bean rust’ in the July 30th issue of the crop and pest report.

Sam Markell

Extension Plant Pathologist, Broad-leaf Crops

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