Crop & Pest Report

Accessibility


| Share

Raspberry Cane Borer (07/04/19)

The raspberry cane borer (Oberea perspicillata: Cerambycidae) is rarely a serious pest in North Dakota, but it can be problematic when abundant.

The raspberry cane borer (Oberea perspicillata: Cerambycidae) is rarely a serious pest in North Dakota, but it can be problematic when abundant. The adult is about ½ inches long, and a slender black beetle with a red pronotum and long black antennae.

Adults start emerging in late June and females lay eggs in the pith of primocanes (new canes that will produce fruit the next year), about six inches from the tip of the cane. The female then girdles the stem above and below where the egg was laid. This causes tips of new canes to wilt. The egg hatches in July and the larva burrows down the cane, but stays within two inches of the girdled area during the first winter. During the next year, the larva burrows down the cane and overwinters at or below the ground. The larva completes developing during the second spring and then pupates in the soil.

This pest is easily managed and does not require insecticides since their populations are kept in check by regular pruning. To manage this pest, cut tips about an inch below the girdle and dispose of the effected tissue by burning or placing it in the trash. Also, consider eliminating wild raspberry patches near your patches to reduce overwintering sites.

hort.1

hort.2 

 

Alexander Knudson

Extension Entomological Diagnostician

This site is supported in part by the Crop Protection and Pest Management Program [grant no. 2017-70006-27144/accession 1013592] from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed are those of the website author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

USDA logo

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.