Crop & Pest Report

Accessibility


| Share

Trapping for Emerald Ash Borer (05/24/18)

Crews are placing purple prism traps across the state to monitor for emerald ash borer (EAB).

Trapping for Emerald Ash Borer

Crews are placing purple prism traps across the state to monitor for emerald ash borer (EAB). The big plastic purple traps are placed in the canopies of green ash trees, EAB’s favorite. EAB is attracted to volatiles from ash leaves and bark, to the colors green and purple, and to ash trees. The traps are designed to appeal visually to EAB, and contain a lure add to their appeal. They are covered in sticky tanglefoot and are meant to catch adult EAB beetles.

Adult EAB beetles will emerge from trees around mid-June in our climate. If an EAB lands on a purple trap, it will get stuck in the tanglefoot. Crews will check the traps, collect any suspicious insects stuck on them, and refresh the lure in July, and then the traps will be removed at the end of summer. Insect samples will be screened and any potential EAB beetles will be sent to an expert for identification.

Many partners are helping with this year’s trapping effort, planned and coordinated by the North Department of Agriculture.  City, state, and private citizens are helping set nearly 300 traps this year. EAB has yet to be discovered in North Dakota, but is already found in Manitoba, Minnesota, and South Dakota.

lz

Lezlee Johnson

North Dakota Forest Service

Forest Health Manager

This site is supported in part by the Crop Protection and Pest Management Program [grant no. 2017-70006-27144/accession 1013592] from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed are those of the website author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

USDA logo

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.