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Update on Sunflower Insect Trapping (08/06/20)

Trap catches for banded sunflower moth and Arthuri sunflower moths peaked at most sites this past week.

Trap catches for banded sunflower moth and Arthuri sunflower motent.2hs peaked at most sites this past week. IPM insect trappers have observed an average of 62 moths per trap per week for banded sunflower moth and an average of 21 moths per trap per week for Arthuri sunflower moth. See the past issue #11 of NDSU Extension Crop & Pest Report for scouting and E.T. for banded sunflower moth and Arthuri sunflower moth.

Trap catches for sunflower moth are high at E.T. levels near Mohall and Dickinson. Sunflower moth can be very damaging to the sunflower head since larvae tunnel through seeds (3-12 seeds per larva) and the back tissue of the head. Severe infestations can cause 30-60% loss of the head, and increase the risk for Rhizopus head rot. These heads appear trashy. Larvae are ¾ inch long and brown with white longitudinal stripes. See the past issue #10 of NDSU Extension Crop & Pest Report for scouting and E.T. for sunflower moth. When scouting for red sunflower seed weevils, it is important to look for these seed-damaging moths!

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Janet J. Knodel

Extension Entomologist

 

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