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Soybean Gall Midge (07/30/20)

You have probably heard about the new soybean insect pest called soybean gall midge, Resseliella maxima. Currently, it has only been observed in five states including Minnesota, South Dakota, Iowa, Nebraska and Missouri (Map 1).

You have probably heard about the new soybean insect pest called soybean gall midge, Resseliella maxima. Currently, it has only been observed in five states including Minnesota, South Dakota, Iowa, Nebraska and Missouri (Map 1). The good news is NO soybean gall midge have been found in North Dakota soybeans yet (Map 2). NDSU Extension Entomology and the IPM Crop scouts have been busy looking for it in soybean fields this year. Thanks for support from the North Dakota Soybean Council and the North Central Soybean Research Program. Dr. Brian Jensen, Extension Entomologist for University of Wisconsin, also reports no soybean gall midge in Wisconsin’s soybean fields.

We encourage you to look for soybean gall midge when scouting your soybean fields and please let us know if you see anything suspicious. Collect larvae into alcohol vial with ethanol or rubbing alcohol. Thank you.

When scouting for soybean gall midge infested soybeans, it is most likely to be found on the field edges close to last year’s soybean field. Walk a transect along the field edge and look at the base of soybean stems for a darkened black area. If you see a darkened stem, pull up the plant and peel back the dark epidermis with your fingernail. Inspect closely for tiny white or orange larvae underneath the epidermis. Larvae turn orange-reddish when they are mature and ready for pupation. Other symptoms include lodged plants, swollen stems at the base, or wilted plants. This insect has at least two generations, and the second generation can infest stems higher up on plant near branches later in growing season. Watch Bruce Potter’s YouTube video on scouting for soybean gall midge: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ijE9OrVdKM&feature=youtu.be

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Janet J. Knodel

Extension Entomologist

 

Veronica Calles-Torrez

Post-doctoral Scientist

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