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No Soybean Gall Midge Detected in ND (08/29/19)

Soybean gall midge, Resseliella maxima, continues to be an important new pest of soybeans and has increased its presence in Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska and South Dakota from a total of 67 counties in 2018 to 93 counties in 2019 (Source: Justin McMechan, University of Nebraska).

Soybean gall midge, Resseliella maxima, continues to be an important new pest of soybeans and has increased its presence in Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska and South Dakota from a total of 67 counties in 2018 to 93 counties in 2019 (Source:  Justin McMechan, University of Nebraska). Soybean gall midge was also detected in northwest Missouri for the first time this year (Source: Kevin Rice, University of Missouri). However, our 2019 survey for soybean gall midge detected no soybean gall midge in soybeans in ND. We focused on the bordering counties where populations may be moving from Minnesota and South Dakota into ND.

Wondering how to scout for soybean gall midge? Infestations of soybean gall midge are most common near field edges, close to last year’s soybean fields, so focus on field edges. Soybean stems should be inspected for darkened areas near the base (or soil line). Peel back the epidermis near the plant base with your fingernail and look for white or orange larvae underneath the epidermis. Larvae turn orange when they are mature and ready for pupation. This insect has at least two generations in Minnesota, and the second generation can infest stems higher up on plant near branches (Source: Bruce Potter, UMN Extension).

Watch Bruce Potter’s YouTube video on scouting for soybean gall midge at:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ijE9OrVdKM&feature=youtu.be

If you suspect stems infested with soybean gall midge, please let me know. Thank you.

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Janet J. Knodel

Extension Entomologist

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