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Southwest ND (05/12/16)

Information from the Southwest region of North Dakota

Rain over the past week has been variable. According to NDAWN, rainfall in the region from May 4th to May 11th ranges from 0.14 inches in Mott to 0.50 inches in Dunn County. In the past week there has been plenty of activity in the field. Planting progress, like rainfall in the area has been variable. Some growers are just getting started, while some are close to completed with small grains. In Stark County some growers are finishing up small grains, canola, and peas and moving on to corn and flax. In Hettinger County, some of the growers that were in the field early this season are 90% done with planting. With temperatures forecasted to drop into the 30’s be sure to keep an eye out for potential frost damage or issues with imbibitional chilling.

Ryan Buetow

Area Extension Specialist/Cropping Systems

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Weather Forecast: May 12 – May 18 (05/12/16)

Weather Forecast: May 12 – May 18

Weather Forecast: May 12 – May 18

The weather for the next several days canritchison.1 be summed up in two words, cold and dry. Cold enough that frost will probably occur over some parts of North Dakota on each of the next several mornings. Therefore, a reminder to some of the terms you will be hearing in the next few days; a frost advisory is issued when temperatures are expected to reach 36° or colder. A freeze warning is for expected temperatures to reach 32° or colder and a hard freeze warning is issued when tempertures are projected to reach 28° or lower. 

Temperatures are anticipated to be 10 to 20 degrees below seasonal averages through the weekend (Figure 1). The central and western parts of North Dakota already experienced a very chilly morning onritchison.2 Wednesday and that colder air will be reinforced today (Thursday) as a cold front moves through the region. With the colder air will come a brisk northwesterly wind that may cause soil erosion problems in locations that did not record much precipitation earlier this week. That colder air will remain in the area for several days and with it the already mentioned prospect for frost each morning through at least Sunday. Plus, with some cloudiness, maximums may only be in the 40s in some locations this weekend. Temperatures should get back closer to average next week.

That cloudiness at times, may leak out a few very light showers, or I would hate to say it, a flurry, especially on Saturday, but overall, little if any moisture is foreseen through the middle of next week and it may be the May 23 to May 26 period before a more significant rain maker impacts the region.   Because of the well below average temperatures the next several days,  the projected Growing Degree Days (GDDs), base 50°, 44° and 34° for the period May 12 through May 18, 2016 will be quite meager during the next 7 days (Figure 2).

Daryl Ritchison

Assistant State Climatologist/Meteorologist 

(701-231-8209) Twitter: @darylritchison

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Weather/Crop Phenology Maps (05/12/16)

Maps detailing corn accumulated daily growing days, percent normal rainfall, departure from normal average air temperature, and accumulated wheat growing degree days.

Weather/Crop Phenology Maps

Corn

Precipitation

Temperature

Wheat

F. Adnan Akyuz, Ph.D.

Professor of Climatological Practices

North Dakota State Climatologist

http://www.ndsu.edu/ndsco/

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Weather/Crop Phenology Maps (05/05/16)

Maps detailing corn accumulated daily growing days, percent normal rainfall, departure from normal average air temperature, and accumulated wheat growing degree days.

Weather/Crop Phenology Maps

Corn

Precipitation

Temperature

Wheat


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Weather Forecast: May 5 – May 11

Weather Forecast: May 5 – May 11

Weather Forecast: May 5 – May 11

The next 7 days will transition from temperatures being wellweather.ritchison.1 above average to temperatures ending up near or perhaps even below average depending on the track of an area of low pressure next week across the north central part of the United States.

In the short term, it will be quite warm for early May with temperatures perhaps approaching 90° in some locations today (Thursday) as a large ridge of high pressure aloft moves across North Dakota (Figure 1).  If you look closely, the upper-level wind flow (parallel to the black lines) is shaped like the Greek letter omega (Ω).  This tends to be a warm and dry pattern in the northern plains, but this pattern will quickly break down in the next 48 hours and with it a trend toward cooler and wetter weather.

A cold front will move weather.ritchison.2across North Dakota on Friday, with it, some spotty showers and thunderstorms that likely will drop minimal moisture in the locations that do record any rain.  The weekend should be noticeably cooler with a storm moving out of the Rocky Mountains on Sunday and dropping some rain that day in South Dakota.  That rain is projected to lift into North Dakota Monday and Tuesday of next week.  The usual uncertainty exists as to how much moisture will fall across the region and where, but certainly some planting delays can be anticipated.  Until then, besides the slight risk of a few showers/thunderstorms on Friday, the weather looks dry and “plant 16” should be able to continue unabated through the weekend.   Beyond the next 7 days, the current pattern would suggestion a period of below average temperatures mid-month. 

The projected Growing Degree Days (GDDs), base 50°, 44° and 34° for the period May 5 through May 11, 2016 are presented in Figure 2.  In later editions of this publication, forecasts for relative humidity hours above 85% will be given. 

Daryl Ritchison

Assistant State Climatologist/Meteorologist 

Forecast Blog:  ndsu.edu/ndawnblog

(701-231-8209) Twitter: @darylritchison

 

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Southwest ND (05/05/16)

Information from the Southwest region of North Dakota

Soil moisture in the southwest was looking very bleak until mid-April. The past couple of weeks has brought much needed moisture in the forms of snow and slow soaking rains. According to NDAWN, rainfall in the region from April 15th to May 4th ranges from 1.99 inches in Beach to 2.78 inches in Dickinson to 3.65 inches in Hettinger. Just as rainfall has been variable so has planting this spring. In Hettinger County growers are virtually done with wheat and starting in on peas and canola. Further west towards Golden Valley County some are 1/3 done with planting small grains, pulse crops, and canola, with others just starting. Many have their wheat in and are finishing up with any other small grains before moving on to pulse crops or canola. Most in the region are planning on waiting a couple of weeks to start on row crops. There is some activity with herbicide application across the region as well. There are many that had their fertilizer applied before the rainfall came, but for those still looking to apply be sure to soil test and use the NDSU Nitrogen Calculators and Fertilizer Recommendation Tables and Equations.

Follow Dickinson Agronomy on twitter @drecagronomy and on Instagram at drec_agronomy for updates on agriculture and the Dickinson area.

Ryan Buetow

Area Extension Specialist/Cropping Systems

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South Central ND (05/05/16)

Information from the South Central region of North Dakota.

The geographic area covered by this report includes a northern border of Sheridan County to Eddy County southward to Sargent County and west to Emmons County.

According to NDAWN, the region received from 1.5 inches (McHenry) to 4.1 inches (Jamestown) of rain during April. Currently, topsoil moisture is adequate but the soil profile has room for more moisture. Winter cereals are nearing or at jointing stage. Spring wheat and barley seeding began in early April, was delayed nearly two weeks until late April, and should be completed by May 10. Most corn planting began late April and should also be completed by the first third of May. Soybean planting also began this week.

Eight NDSU soybean planting date trials conducted during 2011-15 at Carrington, Hettinger, New Rockford, Prosper and Wishek averaged 9% greater yield (3.9 bu/acre) with planting April 24-May 5 versus May 15-23.

Greg Endres

Area Extension Specialist/Cropping Systems

NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center

 

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Northeast ND (05/05/16)

Information from the Northeast region of North Dakota.

Since last Friday, farm activities have finallyne nd.lubenow.saline soil amped up across the region after a period of cloudy and cool weather.  In mid-April, the region received between 1 to 4 inches of rain. Now, wet fields have dried off, a testament to the dry fall and open winter. Exacerbated by the Tuesday’s high winds, producers are experiencing a loose, powdery seed bed. Accurate seed placement is difficult in these conditions. Some producers are coping by rolling the field to firm up the seed bed. Also, the dry soil profile has saline areas looking florescent white (see photo). Small grains seeding is moving quickly. Early seeded small grains are emerging in the north valley and around Hwy 2. Sugarbeets are expected to be finish seeding by the end of the week. Corn, field pea and potatoes also are going in the ground. After the May 5th insurance date, we expect some soybean fields to be seeded in the region. Producers should keep in mind that we are not out of the average frost date window yet (as I scrap the frost off my car windshield off on Wednesday morning). Generally, soybeans that are seeded about 5 days prior to last average killing frost date have good odds of avoiding a killing frost, a less than 50% chance.

2016 is low commodity price year. Save some money by skipping an insecticide seed treatment on soybeans unless seed corn maggot or wireworms have been problematic. Also, be wary of ‘silver bullet’ non-traditional soil amendments.

Lesley Lubenow

Area Extension Specialist/Agronomy

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North Central ND (05/05/16)

GET TO KNOW: TRAVIS “TJ” PROCHASKA

Travis J. Prochaska, Ph.D., joins the team at the North nc.travis prochaskaCentral Research Extension Center in Minot, North Dakota as the crop protection specialist.  Travis comes from Seward, Nebraska - a small town known for its big celebrations as America’s Official July 4th City – Small Town USA.  Travis grew up in the corn and soybean fields of eastern Nebraska and is no stranger to life on the farm. 

He graduated Concordia University Nebraska with a degree in organismal biology in 2009.  In 2011, Travis obtained his master’s in entomology from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) where his research uncovered one of the first known tolerant soybean varieties against the soybean aphid, Aphid glycines Matsumura. 

In 2015, he completed his doctoral program in entomology at UNL, with his dissertation focus on host plant resistance of switchgrass against two cereal aphids: yellow sugarcane aphid (Sipha flava (Forbes)) and the greenbug (Schizaphis graminum (Rondani)).  Travis is excited to be in North Central North Dakota and looks forward to working with area growers.  You can contact him via email at Travis.Prochaska@ndsu.edu or by phone at (701)-857-7682.

Travis J. Prochaska

Crop Protection Specialist

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Ticks with Lyme disease in ND (05/05/16)

With warmer spring weather, tick season is upon us. So far, we have identified the smaller black legged tick (or deer tick), Ixodes scapularis, and the larger dog ticks, Dermacentor variabilis, from areas of North Dakota and Minnesota.

Ticks with Lyme disease in ND

With warmer spring weather, tick season is upon us. So far, we have identified the smaller black legged tick (or deer tick), Ixodes scapularis, and the larger dog ticks, Dermacentor variabilis, from areas of North Dakota and Minnesota. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the following strategies for field workers and preventing tick bites:hort.knodel.tick

  • Minimizing Direct Contact with Ticks by avoiding woody and high grass areas and walking in center of trails, if possible. Ticks are most active in May through August in North Dakota.
  • Use repellent with 20-30% DEET (N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide) on exposed skin and clothing. This should provide several hours of protection. Or wear clothing treated with permethrin.
  • Quickly find and remove any ticks from body by using a tweezers. Grasp tick close to skin and pull straight up to avoid breaking off the tick’s mouthparts in the skin. Clean bite area with rubbing alcohol or soap and water.
  • Inspect and bath yourself within 2 hours after coming indoors to find any ticks crawling on you and to remove them before they attach to feed on your blood. Ticks like to hides in hair, armpits and other areas that may be difficult to inspect.
  • Wash any clothing that you were wearing soon and then dry in high heat for an hour to kill any ticks. Otherwise, ticks can attach to you later after hitchhiking on your clothes into home.
  • Reduce tick habitat near home.
    • Keep lawns mowed around home.
    • Place a 3-ft wide barrier of wood chips or gravel between lawns, patio or play areas and wooded areas to prevent tick movement.
    • Exclude wildlife (especially deer) that may be carrying ticks into your yard.
  • Some insecticides registered for control of ticks by homeowners in residential areas include:  carbaryl (Sevin®), cyfluthrin (Tempo®, Powerforce™), permethrin (Astro®, Ortho® products, Bonide® products), and pyrethrin (Pyrenone®, Kicker®). Always read and follow the EPA approved label on the product container.

The CDC reports that Lyme disease was the fifth most common ‘National notifiable disease’ in 2014 and about 300,000 people get Lyme disease each year.  Ixodes scapularis or black legged tick (deer tick) vectors Lyme disease. Lyme disease is concentrated in 14 states in the Northeast and upper Midwest regions.

The incidence of Lyme disease was near 16.4% in Minnesota and <1% in North Dakota in 2015. However, Ixodes scapularis is moving west into North Dakota and is considered established in northeastern North Dakota. The North Dakota Department of Health confirmed Lyme disease in five counties last year:  Cass, Grand Forks, McIntosh, Mercer and Towner counties. A Survey of Ticks (Acari:  Ixodidae) and Tick-Borne Pathogens in North Dakota that was published in the Journal of Medical Entomology also confirmed black legged ticks in six counties:  Eddy, Grand Forks, Pembina, Ramsey, Rolette, and Steele counties (see map below).

hort.knodel.tick.map

Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi.  Symptoms of Lyme disease includes:  Bull’s eye rash, headache, fever and fatigue. In a worst case scenario, infections can cause arthritic joints, and affect the nervous system causing facial paralysis, and spinal cord, brain or heart problems. Lyme disease must be treated immediately with antibiotics. It can take 2 to 3 weeks to recovery if treated early. The later you wait for treatment; your symptoms will become more severe and more difficult to cure. For more information, please see the CDC website:  http://www.cdc.gov/Lyme/

Janet J. Knodel

Extension Entomologist

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