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Timing and Application Rate of AMS 21619 Fungicide, Langdon 2002.

 

S. Halley, Langdon Research Extension Center-North Dakota State University, Box 310 Hwy 5 E Langdon, North Dakota 58249

*Corresponding author PH: (701) 256-2582, E-mail: shalley@ndsuext.nodak.edu

 

A trial was established at the Langdon Research Extension Center to evaluate application rates of the AMS 21619 fungicide (JAU 6476) applied at different growth stages. Cultivars �Munich� durum and �Alsen� HRSW were planted in strips at different seeding dates, 14 May and 21 May, respectively to accommodate similar flowering times so that fungicide application could be made to both trials simultaneously. AMS 21619 at 5.7 oz/acre (full rate), applied at Zadoks 65 growth stage, would be compared to an untreated, 3.8 oz/acre, and other rate combinations applied at Zadoks 65 + 3 days and or Zadoks 65 + 3 days + 3 days. The planned rates in oz/acre were:

 

3.8

3.8 + 3.8

3.8 + 3.8 + 3.8

5.7

5.7 +5.7

5.7 + 2.9 + 2.9

 

Due to minimal disease development on the untreated the planned third timing was abandoned. Both trials were designed as a randomized complete block. Flowering dates were similar. A SprayAir� sprayer; an air-assisted spray distribution system angled 30 degrees downward from horizontal and modified by orienting the orifices to spray forward and backward was used to apply the treatments. CO2 was the solution carrier. The areas were divided into plots 12 ft. wide by 20 ft. long. A width approximately 8 feet wide was sprayed and four feet was harvested to determine differences among treatments. Recommended production practices for Northeast North Dakota were followed. Three weeks prior to heading a Fusarium spawn grown on spring wheat was hand broadcast at a rate of approximately 200 grams/plot. Data was analyzed with the general linear model (GLM) in SAS. Least significant differences (LSD) were used to compare means at the 5% probability level.

 

All treatment applications to the durum except a 3.8 oz/acre rate increased yield over the untreated. A split application of 5.7 + 2.9 oz/acre was also greater than all other rates except one of the 3.8 + 3.8 oz rates. All rates except the 3.8 oz/acre rate also increased test weight over the untreated. No differences were determined among application to Alsen HRSW. It was unlikely that yield increases could be attributed solely to reductions in FHB and leaf disease levels as both were quite small.

 

 

 

 

Table 1. Munich Durum

Fungicide Rate and Timing

Yield

Test Weight

Zadoks 65

+ 3 days

 

 

oz/acre

bu/acre

lb/bu

 

 

 

 

Untreated

 

72.3

58.7

 

 

 

 

3.8

 

77.6

59.2

3.8

3.8

79.6

60.0

3.8

3.8

82.8

60.2

 

 

 

 

5.7

 

78.7

59.3

5.7

5.7

79.6

60.1

5.7

2.9

86.0

59.9

 

 

 

 

LSD*

 

5.6

0.6

% C.V.

 

6

1

* Significant at 0.05 probability level for mean comparisons.

 

Table 2. Alsen HRSW

Fungicide Rate and Timing

Yield

Test Weight

Zadoks 65

+ 3 days

 

 

oz/acre

bu/acre

lb/bu

 

 

 

 

untreated

 

57.4

59.8

 

 

 

 

3.8

 

59.0

59.7

3.8

3.8

58.6

59.9

3.8

3.8

60.2

59.8

 

 

 

 

5.7

 

60.6

59.7

5.7

5.7

58.5

59.5

5.7

2.9

62.0

59.8

 

 

 

 

LSD*

 

NS

NS

% C.V.

 

4

1

* Significant at 0.05 probability level for mean comparisons.

 

 

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