ISSUE 14   August 26, 2010

TIPS FOR PLANTING WINTER WHEAT IN 2010

  1. Plant winter wheat into standing stubble.  Survival of winter wheat during the winter is enhanced when it is covered with snow during the coldest months of the year.  Standing crop residues can effectively retain snow that may fall.  Tall, erect flax and canola stubble works best, but any erect stubble that will retain snow is recommended.  Planting winter wheat into wheat stubble is not ideal for disease reasons, but as long as disease management is planned, wheat stubble can be an acceptable residue.
  2. Plant winter-hardy adapted varieties. Use a winter hardy variety, especially if you are not planting into residue.  Jerry, the latest NDSU release and varieties developed in Canada are among the most winter hardy varieties currently available.  Accipiter and Peregrine are new varieties from Canada that have proven winter hardiness.  Varieties that were developed for Nebraska may not have sufficient winter-hardiness some years, and should be used only if planted into standing stubble and should probably not be your primary winter wheat variety if you plant any significant acreage. Varieties developed in SD and MT tends to be intermediate in winter hardiness to those developed in ND/Canada and those developed in NE.  Variety performance data from the 2009 season are available at http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/smgrains/ww%20circular%202009.pdf.  Table 1 also summarizes data from two locations in eastern ND for the 2010 season.
  3. Apply Phosphorus at time of seeding.  Phosphorus fertilization can play a role in winter hardiness, especially if soil tests are low for P.  Applying 10-15 lbs of P with the seed may improve winter survival some years.  Excessive N prior to winter freeze-up, however, can reduce winter survival.
  4. Plant in September. The optimum planting date for the northern half of the state is September 1-15 and for the southern half September 15-30.  The last practical date that winter wheat can be planted will depend on the weather since there must be enough growing degree days so that the seed can germinate so that the crop will be vernalized by the spring.  Larger seedlings will over winter better than a small seedling.  Target the earlier portion of the recommended planting date range if planting into bare, fallow ground.
  5. Plant 1 to 1.5 inches deep. Adequate moisture for establishing winter wheat is often a concern as the soil profile is usually depleted of moisture in the fall.  If there is little or no moisture in the soil’s surface, planting shallow (1 to 1.5 inches deep) and waiting for rain is recommended.  Furthermore, these relatively shallow planting depths allow for faster emergence when temperatures are rapidly declining.
  6. Seed about a million seeds per acre.  Generally a seeding rate of 900,000 to 1.2 million viable seed per acre is adequate.  The higher seeding rate may be appropriate if planting late or when planting into poor seedbeds.  Since winter wheat tends to tiller more profusely than spring wheat, 1.2 million seeds per acre is the upper end of the recommended seeding rate.  Excessively high seed rates can result in more lodging by harvest time, particularly if you are using a taller variety (like Jerry). 

Table 1. Preliminary yield data from winter wheat varieties grown in two locations in ND, with and without fungicides*, 2010.

 

Forman

Prosper

 

Fung

No Fung

Fung

No Fung

 

------------------(bu/acre)----------------   

Accipiter

55.1

46.9

49.6

49.8

Art

64.7

57.2

71.1

60.6

Boomer

56.7

47.5

70.1

59.9

Carter

57.2

42.5

64.9

55.1

CDC Falcon

57.3

44.3

56.6

51.4

Darrell

61.9

58.2

70.1

63.1

Decade

54.6

49.3

73.1

65.8

Hawken

51.9

47.5

61.9

47.2

Jagalene

60.3

39.2

67.4

45.5

Jerry

53.7

53.6

73.6

63.4

Lyman

55.9

51.8

58.3

50.9

Mace

48.4

47.2

55.0

49.2

Millenium

65.9

50.3

74.5

69.4

Overland

70.5

54.8

76.1

65.4

Peregrine

59.8

55.2

68.6

57.3

Striker

52.8

48.6

62.6

58.4

Wesley

58.5

44.0

61.0

56.5

Yellowstone

47.2

35.3

60.8

47.6

Average

57.4

48.5

65.3

56.5

 *At Forman, fungicides consisted of Stratego™ at the 4 lf stage and Prosaro™ at flowering, while at Propser, Prosaro™ was applied only at flowering.

 Joel Ransom
Extension Agronomist for Cereal Crops
Joel.Ransom@ndsu.edu

 

GRANT FUNDING OPPORTUNITY FOR ON FARM RESEARCH

The small grain harvest is winding down and corn and soybean crops are not yet ready for combining. This would be a good time to think about the 2011 season. Most producers have great ideas to improve their farming practices. On farm research on new practices is a great way to learn and explore new ideas.

The 2010 North Central Region - Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program (NCR-SARE) Farmer Rancher Grant Call for Proposals is now available specifically for research ideas related to sustainable farming. Many North Dakota producers are interested in reducing tillage of the fields, incorporating cover crops and other new farming practices. Farmers and ranchers in the North Central Region, which includes North Dakota and Minnesota, are invited to submit grant proposals to explore sustainable agriculture solutions to problems on the farm or ranch.  Proposals should show how farmers and ranchers plan to use their own innovative ideas to explore sustainable agriculture options and how they will share project results with other producers. Projects should emphasize research, education or demonstration. Grants can range from $6,000 for individual farmers up to $18,000 for groups of three or more farmers.

NCR-SARE expects to fund about 50 projects in the twelve-state North Central Region for the 2011 production season. The funding will be available in the spring of 2011 in time for research during the cropping season. Interested applicants can find the call for proposals online, as well as useful information for completing a proposal, at http://www.sare.org/NCRSARE/cfp.htm.  Proposals are due on Thursday, December 2, 2010 at 4:30 p.m. at the NCR-SARE office in Jefferson City, MO. Potential applicants with questions can contact Joan Benjamin, Associate Regional Coordinator and Farmer Rancher Grant Program Coordinator, at benjaminj@lincolnu.edu  or 800-529-1342.

Each state in SARE's North Central Region has a State Sustainable Agriculture Coordinator. In North Dakota the coordinator is Frank Kutka (frank.kutka@ndsu.edu or 701-483-2348, ext 113), who can provide information and assistance to potential grant applicants. Producers are encouraged to work with extension agents and other agricultural professionals to develop a strong proposal. The projects will be evaluated by farmers and professionals working in agriculture. 

Hans Kandel
Extension Agronomist Broadleaf Crops
Hans.Kandel@ndsu.edu


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