ISSUE 1   May 10, 2007

NEW EXTENSION PLANT PATHOLOGIST JOINS NDSU

Before I begin composing articles, giving talks, and interacting with people throughout the state, I wanted to introduce myself. My name is Sam Markell, and I joined the plant pathology department at NDSU on April 16. I have the same responsibilities as my predecessor, Carl Bradley, which includes diseases of broadleaf crops.

I am originally a Minnesota native, but received a B.S. degree in biology and M.S. degree in plant pathology at NDSU. In February, I finished a Ph.D. in plant pathology at the University of Arkansas. My reasearch projects focused on Fusarium head blight (FHB) and stripe rust of wheat, but I have been involved with soybean and canola diseases as well. I am happy to be home! I look forward to meeting and working with people in the state, and providing information on management of plant diseases.

 

TWO PRODUCTS RECEIVE SECTION 18 REGISTRATION FOR LENTIL SEED TREATMENT

Two seed treatment products received a Section 18 registration on March 6 for use on lentil to control Ascochyta blight. The products are LSP Flowable (Bayer product) and Mertect 340 (Syngenta product). LSP Flowable is to be applied between 1.7 - 3.0 fl oz/cwt, while Mertect 340 is to be applied at 1.05-1.85 fl oz/cwt. Thiabendazole is the active ingredient in both products. The Section 18 labels are good from Feb. 21 - June 1, 2007. Label information on these two section 18 products may be found at:

http://agdepartment.com/Programs/Plant/PesticideRegProg.html

 

CORRECTION - POTATO LEAK CONTROL

The published NDSU 2007 Fungicide Guide (PP-622) indicated that Pythium leak of potato may be controlled with the use of sodium, potassium or ammonium phosphites. Dr. Neil Gudmestad, NDSU Dept. of Plant Pathology, has indicated that these phosphite products, when used alone, have no efficacy on Pythium leak.

 

PROLINE REGISTERED FOR DRY BEANS, CANOLA, PULSE CROPS AND OTHER CROPS

The Bayer CropScience fungicide "Proline 480 SC" has been granted Section 3 full-registration for use on canola, chickpea, lentils, dry peas, dry beans, crambe, and field mustard. Proline is a triazole (prothiconazole) fungicide, FRAC group 3, and has broad activity against different fungal pathogens. According to the label, Proline can be used to control Ascochyta blight of lentils and chickpea, Sclerotinia stem blight of canola, white mold of dry peas and beans, and Sclerotinia stem rot of field mustard, crambe, and other crops. The recommended rate for control of diseases listed above is 4.3-5.7 fl oz/acre. For more information on timing and rate of applications refer to the Proline 480 SC label.

Sam Markell
Ext. Plant Pathologist
samuel.markell@ndsu.edu

 

COMPILATION OF 2006 NDSU SMALL GRAIN FUNGICIDE RESULTS AVAILABLE

A compilation of NDSU associated 2006 small grain fungicide trials may be found through the NDSU Extension Plant Pathology web site, at the following link:

http://www.ag.ndsu.nodak.edu/extplantpath/Fungicide%20Field%20Trials.pdf

These results were was provided by Extension state and area specialists and Experiment station agronomists across ND, and represent fungicide work done on spring wheat, durum wheat, barley and winter wheat during the 2006 growing season. Small grain disease pressure was very low across most sites in 2006, but some differences among fungicide treatments were noted.

 

NEW FUNGICIDE REGISTRATIONS FOR WHEAT AND BARLEY FOR 2007

A. Sec. 18 for tebuconazole: A Section 18 emergency exemption was granted on 4/18/2007 for use of tebuconazole on wheat (including durum) and barley for suppression of Fusarium head blight in 2007. The exemption runs until Sept. 1, 2007. The products registered for use in ND under this Section 18 exemption include:

Trade Name of Tebuconazole

Company

Folicur 3.6F

Bayer CropScience

Orius 3.6F

Makhteshim

Muscle 3.6F

Sipcam

Embrace 3.6L

Agriliance

Tebuzol 3.6F

UPI

TebuStar 3.6L

Albaugh

Tebuconazole is to be applied at 4 fl oz/acre at early flowering for wheat and full head emergence in barley. The Section 18 labels do not specify use of an adjuvant, but NDSU testing with these products indicates they perform better when a non-ionic surfactant is added.

B. Proline Sec. 3 Registration: A Section 3 full registration was granted on 4/16/2007 for the use of Proline 480 SC fungicide on wheat and barley in ND. The registrant is Bayer CropScience. Proline is a triazole (prothioconazole) fungicide with a wide spectrum of activity.

Proline is to be applied at 4.3-5.7 fl oz/acre for suppression of Fusarium head blight (FHB). (NDSU has not tested any rate lower than 5 fl oz/acre) For leaf disease control, the Proline label recommends 2.8-4.3 fl oz/acre for barley and 4.3 - 5.7 fl oz/acre for wheat. NDSU’s testing of this product has always included a non-ionic surfactant in the tank mix.

 

LABEL INFORMATION FOR THE ABOVE FUNGICIDES can be found at the ND Dept. of Agriculture’s Web site at:

http://agdepartment.com/Programs/Plant/PesticideRegProg.html

 

CORN FOLLOWING WHEAT - DISEASE RISKS

A few questions have been asked about the disease risk associated with planting corn after wheat. The primary risk is the potential for seedling blight from Fusarium graminearum or from a few other fungal species. My recommendation would be to use a seed treatment for control of seedling blights in corn. Fortunately, most corn seed purchased already is treated with one of the several fungicides that will control seedling blights.

 

WHEAT FOLLOWING CORN - SCAB RISK

Over 1100 wheat fields were surveyed statewide in 2006 for diseases and insects. Only 2.5% of these wheat fields were planted into corn ground. However, by 2008, with the increased corn acreage in ND, there is the big possibility of this percentage going higher. The risk of Fusarium head blight (scab) goes up for wheat and barley if the crop is planted into corn ground. The scab fungus often inhabits corn stalks and overwinters very well in those stalks. The fungus also produces many more spores on corn stalk residue than on wheat or barley residue. Any grower planting wheat or barley into corn ground will have to take extra precautions, using a variety with the best resistance available and using an appropriate fungicide treatment if conditions favor the disease.

Marcia McMullen
Ext. Plant Pathologist
marcia.mcmullen@ndsu.edu

 

SUGARBEET CROP UPDATE

Sugarbeet growers in North Dakota and Minnesota are off to a good start in their sugarbeet planting.

American Crystal Sugar Company growers have completed planting just over 90% of their acreage. Wetter conditions in the Hillsboro and Moorhead factory districts have delayed planting in those districts. Minn- Dak Farmers Cooperative growers have completed about 75% of their planting. Growers in the west and southwest areas of the Minn-Dak district have been hampered by wet soil conditions early in the season and had significant amounts of rainfall last week. Southern Minnesota Beet Sugar Cooperative growers have completed planting over 90% of their acres.

The sugarbeet crop should be off to a good start since the warm soils and adequate moisture will accelerate germination and emergence. It would be useful to have a cover crop to protect seedlings especially on soils that ‘blows’. Barley and oats at half a bushel per acre are widely used as cover crops. The cover crop should be killed when sugarbeets are in the three to four leaf stage.

 

PROJECTIONS FOR 2007 SUGARBEET CROP

Total sugarbeet acreage in the US for 2007 is projected at about 1.367 million acres; a slight reduction from 2006 because of the bumper crop last year.

American Crystal Sugar Company will plant about 498,000 acres, Minn- Dak will plant 109,000 acres, and Southern Minnesota Beet Sugar Cooperative will plant 111,000 acres. Growers in Western North Dakota will plant about 15,000 acres for the processing plant in Sidney, Montana. This means that North Dakota and Minnesota will plant a total of 760,140 acres of sugarbeet which is about 54% of the US sugarbeet acreage.

Growers will be continue their efforts at improving efficiency by properly preparing seed beds, using starter fertilizer, using adequate seeding rate to start with a good plant stand and timely application of herbicides for effective weed control to give their crop a good foundation.

Mohamed Khan
Extension Sugarbeet Specialist
701-231-8596


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