ISSUE 14   August 2, 3006

2005 ND WEED CONTROL RESEARCH BOOKS AVAILABLE

Many of you may be aware that the NDSU Weed Science group publishes field research results in the ND Weed Control Research books. These books contain the compiled summary of most all weed research conducted by NDSU weed scientists, area agronomists, and experiment station scientists. The Weed Science group has been printing their weed research data in this form since the mid 70s.

Due the diligence of Cal Messersmith, Janet Davidson-Harrington, computer programers, and time slip help, much of the data has been entered into a "first-of-a-kind" computer data base that will allow searching on a wide range of factors to get most any kind of data comparisons.

We printed more books from the 2005 field weed research than needed. If any of you would like to receive one, send back this email with your address. It will cost us some money to send these books so we will try to send as long as the budget holds out so if any of you are in Fargo and want to stop and pick one up give me some advanced notice and we can have set out for you.

Send me a note at: r.zollinger@ndsu.edu

 

NEW ND PESTICIDE USE SURVEY AVAILABLE

It is almost an embarrassment to announce this but the 2004 North Dakota Pesticide Use Survey has finally been printed and now available from the NDSU Distribution Center.

The publication is W-1308 Pesticide Use and Pest Management Practices in North Dakota 2004. You can order by emailing Ardis at the distribution center at acarvell@ndsuext.nodak.edu or calling 701 231-7882.

It will soon be available on the web at the NDSU Weed Science web site: www.ndsu.edu/weeds/

Here is summary information that might be interesting:

Historical ranking of herbicides based on use.

Rank

1978

1992

2004

1

2,4-D

2,4-D

Glyphosate

2

Trifluralin

MCPA

MCPA

3

MCPA

Dicamba

Fenoxaprop

4

Far-Go

Trifluralin

2,4-D

5

Barban

Tribenuron

Bromoxynil

6

EPTC

Thifensulfuron

Dicamba

 

NEW NC EXTENSION PUBLICATIONS

Extension Weed Scientists in the North Central Region have embarked on a plan to develop a series of extension publications on weed management from glyphosate. This includes weeds that are or might become resistant, troublesome, and tolerant in glyphosate systems. The series will also include glyphosate stewardship/management publications.

Extension specialists are writing publications on horseweed, wild buckwheat, common lambsquarters, waterhemp, common and giant ragweed, and others.

The horseweed publication was printed a couple of years. Mike Moechnig, SDSU, Dallas Peterson, KSU, and myself competed the wild buckwheat publication.

GWC-10 Biology and Management of Wild Buckwheat can be ordered from the NDSU Extension Distribution Center by emailing Ardis at acarvell@ndsuext.nodak.edu or calling 701 231-7882. External funding sources paid for the printing but there might a slight charge for shipping and handling.

These publications are also available on the web at the NDSU Weed Sci Web site:

http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/weeds

Dr. George Kegode, NDSU Weed Ecologist and I have just completed the next one, Biology and Management of Biennial Wormwood. It will not be a NC Regional publication in that it seems to only inflict ND. But, it will be an NDSU Extension publication and will be in the same format as the horseweed and buckwheat publication. It will be printed and available within the next month or so.

 

WHERE ARE THE CHEMICAL COMPANIES?

Perhaps this it more trivia than useful information, but Arnold Appleby, a renowned weed scientist, recently summarized the trend in herbicide companies that synthesized, developed, and sold their own herbicides in the U.S. and Canada. In the last 35 years, the estimated number of herbicide companies decreased from 46 to 8 (Table 1). The eight remaining companies listed were BASF, Bayer, Chemtura, Dow, DuPont, FMC, Valent, and Syngenta.

Table 1. Number of herbicide companies in the U.S. Year Approximate number of companies

1970

46

1975

35

1980

29

1985

23

1990

17

1995

15

2000

10

2005

8

The cause of this decrease is largely due to buy-outs and mergers and is driven by market forces such as higher costs to develop products because of higher registration requirements and greater competition among a many excellent herbicides on the market.

Why might this information be important? Just consider it in the context of new herbicide discovery and development. If there are fewer companies, it is logical to expect that there may be fewer new herbicide ingredients being developed. This is good justification to preserve existing herbicides. If you are curious about where your favorite herbicide company disappeared to (perhaps you really liked their hats) or simply cannot remember (like me), you can check the web site of Herbicide Company "Genealogy" at

http://cropandsoil.oregonstate.edu/herbgnl/descr.html

This chart tracks the herbicide companies names, dates of origin, and dates of merger or acquisition. So, where did Velsicol end up? How about Shell? Rhone-Poulenc? Stauffer? If you want to know, just check the "Genealogy" for the answers.

Source: Appleby, A. P. 2005. A history of weed control in the United States and Canada. Weed Science 53:762-768.

Richard Zollinger
NDSU Extension Weed Specialist
r.zollinger@ndsu.edu


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