NDSU Crop and Pest Report
Plant Pathology


ISSUE 5   June 3 2004

NDSU IPM CROP SURVEY BEGINS

NDSUís summer IPM survey began last week with training of field scouts at the Carrington Research Extension Center. Field scouts and their local coordinators are:

Scout

Coordinator

Location

Clara Presser

Greg Endres

Carrington REC

Josh Seekins

Roger Ashley

Dickinson REC

Samantha Roth

Roger Ashley

Dickinson REC

Nikki Zahradka

Terry Gregoire

Devils Lake Area Office

Nathan Carlson

Janet Knodel

North Central REC

Heather Dickinson

Janet Knodel

North Central REC

Tammy Link

Marcia McMullen

NDSU, Fargo

Jerry Schneider - computer analyst

Phil Glogoza

NDSU, Fargo

The field scouts will be examining fields of wheat, barley, canola, sunflower, and soybean for major diseases and insects. The information they gather will be provided on a timely basis to producers and crop advisors in the weekly NDSU Crop and Pest Report and via Agdakota and county ag alerts. Tammy Link, surveyor in the SE and EC region of North Dakota, observed some low levels of tan spot in wheat fields in Richland county last week. Recent rains should be favorable for fungal leaf spots, once temperatures warm up and fields dry out.

Weekly summary maps of the past weekís survey observations will be available at the following web address:

http://www.ag.ndsu.nodak.edu/aginfo/ndipm/  

The NDSU IPM survey helps provide information on immediate pest threats and on distribution and severity of pests. The NDSU scouts surveyed 2508 fields during the 2003 IPM survey.

 

CEREAL RUST DEVELOPMENT IN SOUTHERN PLAINS

According to the Cereal Rust Bulletin #5, dated May 26th, wheat leaf rust severities of 20-60% were found in wheat fields in southern Kansas. This leaf rust development may provide spores for the northern wheat growing areas. Anyone still planting wheat in ND should be planting cultivars with more tolerance to prevalent races of leaf rust, as late planted susceptible varieties will have the biggest risk of severe infection.

Stripe rust development is very light in Kansas this year. Stem rust is not being observed. The St. Paul, Minnesota buckthorn nursery is showing heavy infections of the aecial stage of oat crown rust. Buckthorn is the alternate host of oat crown rust.

Marcia McMullen
Extension Plant Pathologist
mmcmulle@ndsuext.nodak.edu

 

POTATO CULLS: A SOURCE OF LATE BLIGHT

Potato culls that are infected with the late blight pathogen (Phytophthora infestans) are a major inoculum source for the disease. Spores coming from the infected cull piles, can move into potato fields and cause disease. To reduce the risk of late blight from cull piles, cull potatoes should preferably be deeply buried, covered with soil, and monitored for volunteer plants. Volunteer plants need to be destroyed as they may also harbor the late blight pathogen.

Carl Bradley
Extension Plant Pathologist
carl.bradley@ndsu.nodak.edu


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