NDSU Crop and Pest Report

FROM AROUND THE STATE


ISSUE 2  May 8, 2003

South-Central ND

During the past week (April 30 to May 6), area rainfall ranged from 1.1 inches at Carrington and Linton to 2.6 inches at Jamestown as recorded at NDAWN (North Dakota Agricultural Weather Network) sites. Topsoil moisture is currently adequate but subsoil generally is not at full moisture levels.

In counties south of I94 and east of Hwy 281, wheat and barley planting is essentially complete. West to the Missouri River and north of I94, small grain planting is about 75% complete. The recent rain has provided an excellent environment for small grain emergence. Corn planting is in progress, with 75 to 90% of the seed in the ground in LaMoure, Dickey, Ransom, and Sargent counties. A low percent of soybean acres were planted before the rain. When soil conditions allow planting to resume, corn and soybean will be the priority crops. Reports across the region continue to indicate winter survival of alfalfa is good. Light frost occurred on May 7 that caused some temporary foliage damage to alfalfa. Winter wheat fields generally appear satisfactory and growers should consider nitrogen top-dressing and early-season foliar fungicide application. Wild oat spraying in wheat likely will begin next week in the south-east counties. Cutworms have been reported feeding on early-planted field peas in Eddy County.

Greg Endres
Area Extension Specialist/Cropping Systems  
NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center  
Gregory.Endres@ndsu.nodak.edu

 

Southwest ND

Rainfall generally throughout southwest North Dakota was about an inch during this past week though there were some areas north of Beach and north east of Mott that only received 0.25 inches. Rainfall since the beginning of May to May 7 was 0.53 inches. Producers for the most part were well ahead of average in planting prior to rainfall occurring. It will be a couple of days before producers can get back into the field to finish planting small grains and corn.

Alfalfa in the Dickinson area stands at about 8 to 10 inches in height.

Roger O. Ashley
Area Extension Specialist/Cropping Systems
Dickinson Research Extension Center


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