NDSU Crop and Pest Report

Entomology


ISSUE 1  May 2, 2002

 

INSECTICIDE SEED TREATMENTS FOR SOIL INSECTS

Seed or planter box treatments are used on a wide variety of North Dakota crops for protection from seedcorn maggot, wireworms, and/or seedcorn beetle. The following tables highlight common treatments and labeled crops. The insecticide component of these treatments is either lindane, diazinon, chlorpyrifos, permethrin , or tefluthrin and should provide early protection to seeds from feeding by the above soil insects. Planting into cool, wet soils put young seedlings at greater risk to injury from insects. Keep weather conditions in mind when making final planting decisions.

For further information about seed treatments and the fungicide component, as well as interaction with inoculants, see the articles under Plant Pathology.

Some Common ND Seed Treatments with Insecticide

(labeled crops indicated by "x")

 

Seed Treatment

Corn Wheat Barley Soybean Sunflower Dry Bean Peas
Agrox Premiere

x

-

-

-

-

-

-

Assault 25

x

-

-

x

-

-

-

Barracuda              RUP

x

-

-

x

-

-

-

DB Green

x

x

x

-

-

-

-

Diazinon 50W

x

-

-

-

-

-

x

Enhance Plus

-

x

x

-

-

-

-

Gaucho (various formulations)

x

x

x

-

-

-

-

Germate Plus

x

-

-

-

-

x

-

Seedmate Isotox F

x

x

-

-

x

x

-

Kernel Guard

x

-

-

-

-

x

x

Kernel Guard Supreme

x

-

-

x

-

-

-

Lindane 30 C

-

x

x

-

-

-

-

Lorsban 50SL      RUP

x

-

-

-

-

x

x

Grain Guard Plus

x

x

x

x

-

-

x

Raze

x

-

-

-

-

-

-

Sorghum Guard

x

x

x

x

x

-

x

 

WHEAT MIDGE RISK - OUTLOOK POSITIVE

The wheat midge risk map for 2002 was released in February. Estimated populations of overwintering midge are as low as they have been in the seven years of the ND Wheat Commission sponsored survey. This should be good news.

One word of caution. Last year, the greatest numbers of midge were located in the northwest part of the state, following a line from McLean County to Divide County. However, due to lack of rain in August and September, the larvae in the wheat heads were not stimulated to drop from heads into the soil where they overwinter. Since the soil survey, which is designed collect and estimate overwintering larvae, failed to locate larvae, it is assumed survival of larvae was low. As always, if wheat is heading when midge are expected to emerge, it is recommended that fields are scouted to determine an individual fields risk of infestation.

As a reminder, the map is presented your reference. You can also find the map and keep track of degree day accumulations at the NDSU Entomology Updates, found at:

http://www.ag.ndsu.nodak.edu/aginfo/entomology/entupdates/index.htm

2001 Wheat Midge larval survey map

 

Phillip Glogoza
Extension Entomologist
pglogoza@ndsuext.nodak.edu

 

MUSTANG INSECTICIDE USE IN SUGARBEET: SOME CONSIDERATIONS

The rapid registration of Mustang insecticide for use in sugarbeet has generated a substantial amount of interest among growers and agricultural professionals in the Red River Valley. Additional attention has resulted due to its low product cost per acre for certain applications.

However, growers should consider several factors before choosing to apply Mustang for sugarbeet insect management. First, the insect being targeted should be considered: 1) the Mustang label states that it offers only suppression (not control) of light to moderate infestations of sugarbeet root maggot; 2) currently, there is very little to no performance data available for other secondary sugarbeet pests on the Mustang label (i.e., cutworm, wireworm, white grub); and 3) the anticipated pest problem will dictate which placement technique should be used (i.e., 3-inch T-band will be better for root maggot suppression or cutworm control; micro-tube in-furrow will likely perform better for managing wireworms and white grubs). Growers should choose the appropriate method based on their field history of pest problems. Second, calibration is critical to ensure that the appropriate application rate is applied. Overapplication can diminish net return on investment, may pose undue risks to nontarget organisms, and is also illegal. Underapplication may result in poor insect control and also be a waste of input dollars. Third, several growers have reported problems with nozzle clogging and formation of slime-like tank precipitates when tank-mixing Mustang with starter (i.e., 10-34-0) fertilizer. The formation of glue-like clumps in Mustang/water mixes occurred in testing by the manufacturer (FMC Corp.) under cold (high 20's and low 30's) conditions. Currently, FMC recommends not tank-mixing Mustang with starter fertilizer and offers the following recommendations for reducing or eliminating cold-temperature complications:

  1. Keep product in warm storage during early spring when outdoor temperatures are cold.
  2. When using Mustang under cold conditions or with cold water, it is advisable to add a compatibility agent such as Unite or Complete to the water at the full recommended rate (4 pts/100 gal) prior to adding Mustang. Make sure the compatibility agent mixes well before adding Mustang. Cold conditions are described as 40 degrees F or less for water or air.
  3. For the compatibility agent to work effectively, it must be allowed to mix well with the water. Agitation or mixing may be necessary prior to adding Mustang.
  4. Add Mustang and allow it to mix well before planting.

Remember to always READ, UNDERSTAND, and FOLLOW all label directions and precautions. It is illegal to use an insecticide in a manner inconsistent with its label.

Mark Boetel
Research & Extension Entomologist, NDSU
mboetel@ndsuext.nodak.edu

 


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