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ISSUE 6  June 7, 2001

 

WIREWORM, CUTWORM - ONLY SCATTERED REPORTS

Reports of cutworm and wireworm from out west are increasing. See Around the State article from Jan Knodel for more details. With the continued cool temperatures and favorable moisture in the upper soil profile, expect wireworms to stay active for a while. Normally, as temperatures warm up and top soil dries, the wireworms retreat to deeper depths.

Cutworm reports still are only trickling in from around North Dakota. Minnesota did report some numbers in the 1to 5 per square foot range from counties south of Otter Tail County. This report was posted in the Minnesota Pest Report which can be found at:

http://www.mda.state.mn.us/pestsurvey/

 

TICK INFORMATION

We have had numerous calls regarding tick infestations. So in response to some requests, here is an update.

The American dog tick, or wood tick, is the most common one found in ND. In Minnesota, the blacklegged tick, formerly know as the deer tick, and the American dog tick, are both found. They can be found in grassy fields and in the undergrowth of hardwood forests. All ticks go through an egg, larva, nymph, and adult stage during their development. While they may be found throughout the year, dog tick adults are most active during late April through May. Blacklegged tick adults are most active in late summer and fall.

The larva, nymph, and adult stages must each have a blood meal before they can develop to the next stage. Adult female American dog ticks are reddish brown with whitish markings. The dog tick has a fairly wide host range. Adults commonly infest both large and medium sized mammals such as dogs, cattle, deer, raccoons, and opossum. The immature stages may feed on these same hosts but prefer to infest smaller mammals such as meadow mice, squirrels, and chipmunks. All stages of the dog tick will also feed on humans if given the opportunity. Although they are abundant, the American dog tick is not considered to be a serious human health threat in ND. Specifically, they do not transmit Lyme disease. Although dog ticks do not carry Lyme disease, they are the main carrier of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in the midwestern states. Fortunately, this disease is relatively rare in ND. Blacklegged ticks are generally smaller than American dog ticks. Adult female ticks are brownish-orange with black legs. They feed most commonly on white-footed mice and whitetailed deer, although other mammals, including humans can also be bitten. Blacklegged ticks are important because they can be carriers of Lyme disease. Symptoms of Lyme disease can include a red ring, fatigue, chills, fever, headache, muscle pain, sore throat, nausea, and vomiting. See a doctor right away if you believe you have been infected with Lyme disease.

           
Adult American dog tick, Female (right) and male. Blacklegged tick, Female (right) and male.

Control of ticks in outdoor areas is difficult. While several insecticides are labeled for outdoor tick control, they are usually not effective in eliminating large numbers of ticks in brushy, wooded areas. There are, however, some management techniques that can discourage a buildup of ticks in these areas. Habitat modification is considered to be the most permanent approach to tick management. Ticks must be in areas of high humidity to survive. They are most commonly found in grassy, brushy, wooded, and shaded areas. Reduce the humidity in these areas by keeping grass well_clipped, removing brush, and pruning trees to allow more sunlight to penetrate to the soil surface will discourage ticks from becoming established in these areas.

Insecticide sprays approved for application in ornamental and turf areas for tick control include chlorpyrifos, diazinon, bifenthrin, cyfluthrin, permethrin, tralomethrin or Sevin. Limit applications to the edges of lawns or along paths or trails to minimize tick movement into higher traffic areas.

The best approach when working or recreating in tick infested areas is to use personal protection in the form of repellents, wear protective clothing, and carefully inspect for and promptly and safely remove any attached ticks.

 

ARMYWORM INFESTATION REPORTED

The first armyworm infestation was reported in the southern end of the Red River Valley. Larvae were found in a sugarbeet field. Their size ranged from 1/4 to 3/4 inches. Normally, we would expect to find armyworm in grain crops. With delays in planting and emergence, the moths appear to be choosing sites other than might be expected. There are reports of armyworm from the southern half of Minnesota, but all were at low levels last week.

Armyworms do not overwinter in the region, our populations arise from adults blown in on southerly storm fronts in late spring and early summer. As mentioned last week, there are reports of large armyworm infestations from several states south of us. Regionally, moths have been seen at night and captured in traps. The larvae are dark green to light brown and have a light stripe down the center of their back. Adults normally lay eggs in grassy or weedy areas or in lodged grain. Armyworms, like some cutworms, tend to feed at night and hide throughout the day. If feeding damage is found in the foliage and no other responsible insects pest can be found, scout for armyworms under plant trash, soil clods, or in soil cracks.

Later in the season, treatment thresholds in small grains are when 4 to 5 worms or more are found per sq. foot. This is the same threshold as cutworm. In fact, cutworm thresholds for various crops may be the best guideline for decisions (see Crop and Pest Report, Issue No. 2, May 10, 2001). In general, the same spectrum of insecticides recommended for cutworms will be recommended for armyworms.

For more information on armyworms, refer to NDSU Extension circular, E-830, The Armyworm and The Army Cutworm:

http://www.ext.nodak.edu/extpubs/plantsci/pests/e830w.htm

 

FOREST TENT CATERPILLAR FEEDING IN CROPS ?

A report from the Ian MacRae, Entomologist, U of MN-Crookston, indicated that a field of sugarbeets near Crookston was being damaged by Forest tent caterpillars. He also observed feeding on some other crops such as corn. Last year, the caterpillars were found in fields, but no significant damage was reported.

Strange things can happen under different circumstances. If the caterpillars are still seeking foliage to eat, the field crops may be the only alternative. Situations where this might happen could be a windbreak where small trees dominate and leaves have been entirely consumed.

We hope this report is the exception.

Phillip Glogoza
Extension Entomologist

pglogoza@ndsuext.nodak.edu

 

SUGARBEET ROOT MAGGOT: PEAK FLY ACTIVITY DRAWS NEAR

Degree day (DD) accumulations for the 2001 growing season continue to be monitored for forecasting sugarbeet root maggot (SBRM) fly activity in Red River Valley sugarbeet fields. Based on calculations from the June 3rd readings (compiled by Dr. Robert B. Carlson, NDSU Department of Entomology, retired), growers can expect peak SBRM fly activity to occur in their fields sometime within the next 4-8 days. Activity in this year’s beets is likely to peak between June 6 and 9 in the southern (Sabin, MN to Fargo/Moorhead) portion of the RRV. Similarly, peak activity in the Felton, MN to Reynolds, ND area is expected to take place between June 7 and 9. Populations in the southern portion of the valley and north as far as the Hillsboro, ND area are expected to be low. However, growers, agriculturists, and crop scouts in these areas are urged to still monitor fields at these times to determine if treatment with a postemergence insecticide will be needed. Peak activity in the Minto/St. Thomas vicinity is anticipated to take place between June 9 and 11, and between June 10 and 12 in the Cavalier/ Pembina area.

More precise estimates than these are difficult to arrive at because day-time highs of around 80° F are also necessary for peak activity to occur, and the forecast at the time of this writing indicates that the highs may just barely reach 80 on Saturday June 9th through Tuesday June 12. Cool, wet, and/or windy conditions tend to keep flies inactive. This can result in misleading fly count data and may cause activity to be spread over a longer period of tim

Growers preferring to use a granular product for their postemergence treatment should be applying it as soon as possible. It is better to err on the early side of peak activity with granular materials. Granules are probably a good choice in most areas of our growing region this year because the majority of fields have adequate soil moisture. However, rainfall following granular applications will be welcome because it will help incorporate the insecticide active ingredient and move it into the target zone for SBRM control. If a liquid product is chosen, it will be most effective if applied within 3 days of peak SBRM fly activity.

Table 1. Degree Day accumulations for production areas of the Red River Valley, June 3, 2001.

Location

Degree Days (DD)

Days to Peak fly activity
(from June 3)

Soil

Air (standard)

Air (Sine-converted)

Fargo

396

555

512

3-5 days + a day at or above 80° F

Hillsboro

484

534

486

4-6 days + a day at or above 80° F

St. Thomas

379

501

451

6-8days + a day at or above 80° F

Cavalier

442

488

425

7-9 days + a day at or above 80° F

Mark Boetel
Sugarbeet Entomologist
NDSU Department of Entomology

 

NORTH DAKOTA BIOLOGICAL CONTROL FIELD DAYS AND EVENTS - 2001

Numerous field days have been scheduled around North Dakota for collection and redistribution of the leafy spurge feeding flea beetles. The field days are scheduled from now until the end of June, as shown in the chart on the following page. For further information contact the ND Department of Agriculture by calling 800-242-7535 or checking the internet at:

http://www.state.nd.us/agr

NORTH DAKOTA BIOLOGICAL CONTROL FIELD DAYS AND EVENTS - 2001

Compiled by North Dakota Department of Agriculture (available at www.state.nd.us/agr or call 800-242-7535)

Bring your own cooler to transport beetles

Date

Time

County

Location

Collect your own

Giveaway

Open to Public

County Residents Only

Pre-
registration required

Contact

10-Jun - 30-Jun

9:30am-4-pm

Barnes

Various Locations are Available

X

 

X

   

Jim McAllister 845-3630 840-1473 (cell)

Mid June - Mid July

Williams

Various Locations are Available, call for more information

X

       

Jim Basaraba 572-4883, 572-9313, or 570-9313

12-Jun

1pm-4pm

Stark

Call for Information

X

X

 

X

X

Pete Kostelecky or Kaye Jessen 264-7665

14-Jun

1pm-4pm

Stark

Call for Information

X

X

 

X

X

Pete Kostelecky or Kaye Jessen 264-7665

14-Jun

12pm-4pm

Burleigh

3.5 miles north of I-94 on Hwy 83 to blinking yellow light. Then 1/2 mile east and 1/3 mile south. Follow signs.

X

X

 

X

 

Gary Hartman 222-6763

18-Jun

 

Morton

Call for Location

X

X

X

   

Wayne Carter 667-3389, 391-8006 (cell)

19-Jun

10am-4pm

Grant

Lake Tschida Rest Area south of dam bridge

X

X

 

X

 

Merlin Leithold 584-3204

21-Jun

8am

Billings

Meet at Tjaden Plaza/Burning Hills Amphitheater parking lot

X

X

X

   

Chad Prosser 406-433-9403

21-Jun

9am-12pm

Foster

To Be Announced Will be published in Foster Cty. Independent JUNE

X

X

 

X

 

Nate Monson 652-3658(H) 652-5638 (cell)

25-Jun

9am-12pm

Foster

To Be Announced Will be published in Foster Cty. Independent JUNE

X

X

 

X

 

Nate Monson 652-3658(H) 652-5638 (cell)

25-Jun RAIN DATE

12pm-4pm

Burleigh

3.5 miles north of I-94 on Hwy 83 to blinking yellow light. Then 1/2 mile east and 1/3 mile south. Follow signs.

X

X

 

X

 

Gary Hartman 222-6763

25-Jun

1pm-4pm

Pembina

Frost Fire Mountain Resort - 7 miles west of Walhalla

X

 

X

 

X

Randy Melaas 265-8411

25-Jun

10am-4pm

Eddy

From Warwick: 8.5 miles south, 1 mile East, and 0.5 miles North. From New Rockford: 21 miles East on Hwy 15, 3 miles North, 1 mile East, and 0.5 miles North

X

X

X

   

Randy Littlefield 324-2211 Brian Prince 662-3617

26-Jun

1pm-4pm

Pembina

Hanks Corner - escarpment hill on Hwy 5- 15 miles west of Cavalier

X

 

X

 

X

Randy Melaas 265-8411

26-Jun

1pm-4pm

Stark

Call for Information

X

X

 

X

X

Pete Kostelecky or Kaye Jessen 264-7665

26-Jun

9:30am-4-pm

Wells

Rest Area - Just west of Sykeston

X

X

 

X

 

Donna Rau 547-3158 Clarence Blonigen 652-2699

26-Jun

10am-4pm

Ward

Call for Location

X

X

X

   

Derrill Fick 852-1970

26-Jun

10am-2pm

Eddy

1/2 mile south of Hwy15 & Hwy 20 junction

X

 

X

   

Tim Becker 947-2454

27-Jun

1pm-3pm

Cass

Chaffee, ND: east side of parking lot on highway

 

X

 

X

 

Darwin Hinrichs 282-5487

27-Jun

1pm-4pm

Pembina

Hanks Corner - eskarpment hill on Hwy 5- 15 miles west of Cavalier

X

 

X

 

X

Randy Melaas 265-8411

27-Jun

10am

LaMoure

Meet at Dickey Café - Follow signs from there

X

 

X

   

Bill Saufley 883-4403, 320-8755 (cell)

27-Jun

10am-3pm

Stutsman

Arrowwood NWR Headquarters - 5 miles east of Edmunds on County 44 OR South of Kensal on Hwy 9 to County 44, then 5.5 miles west

X

 

X

   

Paulette Scherr or Dave Azure 285-3341

27-Jun Rain Date

10am-4pm

Eddy

From Warwick: 8.5 miles south, 1 mile East, and 0.5 miles North. From New Rockford: 21 miles East on Hwy 15, 3 miles North, 1 mile East, and 0.5 miles North

X

X

X

   

Randy Littlefield 324-2211 Brian Prince 662-3617

28-Jun

1-4pm

Pembina

Frost Fire Mountain Resort - 7 miles west of Walhalla

X

 

X

   

Randy Melaas 265-8411

28-Jun

11am-12:30pm

Stutsman

West on 5th St. NW, where 282 turns north, keep going west. Located on the same grounds as the Stutsman Co. Road Dept.

X

X

X

   

Bill Ragan 251-1261 320-4512 (cell)

28-Jun

10am-4pm

Ward

Call for Location

X

X

X

   

Derrill Fick 852-1970

29-Jun

 

Logan

Call for Location

 

X

 

X

 

Chuck Fettig 452-2813

2-Jul

9am-12pm

Foster

To Be Announced Will be published in Foster Cty. Independent JUNE

X

X

 

X

 

Nate Monson 652-3658(H) 652-5638 (cell)

6-Jul

10am-4pm

Slope

Community building on the Fairgrounds

 

X

 

X

 

Joan Lorge 879-6316

 

10am-3pm

Griggs

Call for Location

X

X

X

   

John Swenson 797-3312

 


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