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FROM AROUND THE STATE


ISSUE 7  JUNE 17, 1999

 

North-Central ND

    Seeding is still the main focal point in north central North Dakota. Many growers are only 10 to 30
percent seeded. Even though the calendar says June 16 there still are hundreds of thousands of intended
acres to plant. I'm estimating that a minimum of 700,000 acres of crop land that normally is seeded
every year will not be seeded in Rolette, Pierce, Bottineau, McHenry, Renville, Ward, Burke, and
Mountrail counties due to all the water.

    Cool, wet soil conditions has resulted in slow, prolonged sunflower emergence in many areas.
Seeding into fields that were on the wet side at the time of seeding has resulted in severe crusting
which is adding to the problem.

    There are fields of small grains that are reaching the heading stage in Williams and McKenzie
counties. The crop is short as far as plant height, however the yield potential looks above average.
There are small grain fields reaching the flag leaf stage in McLean county with and average of 14
to 16 spikelets per head and two to three tillers per plant. April seeded canola is beginning to bloom.

    Weed control for the most part has been phenomenal in the early crop. High relative humidity and
excellent moisture conditions are resulting in excellent herbicide performance. This excellent herbicide
performance is also resulting in some crop injury as well.

Kent McKay
Area Extension Agronomist
North Central Research/Extension Center
Minot, ND

 

FLEA BEETLE PRESSURES CONTINUE ON CANOLA!

    Flea beetles continue their feeding frenzy! Some fields have been sprayed twice to suppress
economic damage. Flea beetles have been observed feeding on the new tender leaves of older plants
(>4 leaves) and killing the growing point! Continue scouting even in the later stages! On the brighter
side, flea beetle pressure should be winding down in the next week.

 

BERTHA ARMYWORM AND DIAMONDBACK MOTH FLYING

Both late season insect pests of canola are being captured in pheromone traps in the
region - only low trap numbers (<50 moths per trap week).

 

ORANGE BLOSSOM WHEAT MIDGE UPDATE

    The high risk window for the North Central region is primarily May 2 - June 4 in the Northern
tier and May 2 - May 30 in the more southern tier. Wheat planted between these dates will be
heading during the wheat midge emergence. The window for specific locations are as follows:
Rolla = May 4-June 4, Columbus = May 3-June 5, Mohall = May 1-May 30, Bottineau =May
2-June 1, Towner = May 2-May 29, Turtle Lake = May 1-May 28, Minot = April 29-May 27,
and Williston = April 28-May 26 (Source: ND Ag Weather Network). Male wheat midge will
begin emerging at 1100 DD (Base 40oF) and female at 1300 DD. Currently, we are at the
following DDs: Rolla =832, Columbus =795, Mohall =935, Bottineau =910, Towner =970,
Turtle Lake = 965, Minot =1011, and Williston = 1022 (Source: ND Ag Weather Network).
Please consult this website for more information:

www.ndsu.nodak.edu/entupdates/Wheat%20Midge/owbm.htm

 

WHEAT STEM SAWFLY FLYING!

    Wheat stem sawfly is emerging from wheat stubble in the western counties: Mountrail and
Ward Counties. Female will deposit single eggs in stems and prefer plants in the stem elongation
to boot stage. Fields planted after May 20 (most fields in our area) will escape sawfly damage.

 

SMALL GRAIN SURVEY

    Tan spot has been observed on the lower leaves of wheat in counties surveyed: McLean and
Ward. It is very common in most fields but its severity is low. No rust, septoria or grain aphids have
been observed on wheat yet. Tan spot and septoria has been reported on barley north of Minot.

 

SUNFLOWER BEETLES AND GRASSHOPPERS ACTIVE IN SUNFLOWER

    Scout for sunflower beetles and grasshoppers! Some early planted fields are being sprayed for
sunflower beetle. The economic thresholds for sunflower beetle is 1-2 adults per seedling or
10-15 larvae per plant.

 

ALFALFA WEEVIL HIGH ON FIRST CUTTING OF ALFALFA IN WESTERN
PART OF NORTH CENTRAL REGION

    Research indicates that there is a carryover effect from first-cutting alfalfa weevil damage that
reduces yield of subsequent cuttings. Larval feeding reduces alfalfa yield, protein content and digestibility
of the harvested crop. Monitor alfalfa fields until the first cutting for alfalfa weevil damage. Damage will
appear as small, circular holes in the terminal leaves and buds. As larvae continue to grow, the holes
get larger. If it is too early to cut and feeding damage is 30%, consider an insecticide treatment. When
economic infestation develop in the bud stage or later, cut the alfalfa early and monitor the regrowth for
damage after the hay is removed. If regrowth is not occurring, consider treatment if 50% of the terminals
show feeding damage (SD alfalfa IPM threshold). Treat the swath areas with an insecticide where the
larvae are concentrating. Several insecticides are registered for control. Note the preharvest intervals
of different insecticides if spraying before cutting. For example, malathion has no time limitation where
as sevin has a 7 day preharvest interval.

Janet J. Knodel
Area Extension Specialist Crop Protection
North Central Research and Extension Center
Minot, ND

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South-Central ND

CROP PEST MANAGEMENT FIELD SCHOOL

    A Crop Pest Management Field School for crop advisers will be offered by the NDSU Extension
Service on Thursday, July 1 at the Carrington Research Extension Center. The program will cover
weed identification, herbicide mode-of-action and crop problem diagnosis, insect identification, small
grain and canola insect management, small grain foliar and head disease diagnosis and management,
precision fungicide application, and sclerotinia (white mold) management.

    A completed preregistration form and $30 payment is requested by June 24 to be enrolled in the
school. Participation will be limited to the first 50 participants. An application for seven continuing
education units in the pest management area of the CCA program have been submitted. Further
details and a preregistration form may be obtained by contacting the Carrington Center (telephone:
701-652-2951; FAX: 701-652-2055; e-mail: gendres@ndsuext.nodak.edu) or NDSU Extension
Service offices.

Greg Endres
Area Extension Specialist/Cropping Systems
Carrington Research and Extension Center
Carrington, ND


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