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ISSUE 11  July 16, 1998

 

LAWN DISEASES SHOWING UP

    Rainy, cool, cloudy, humid weather gives us what - besides a headache? Turfgrass diseases, of course! Here are some of the ones that are likely to be encountered where the above environmental conditions have existed:

    *Anthracnose - characterized by irregular patches of yellow-bronze, chlorotic, or blighted turfgrass. Reddish-brown lesions and numerous black, fruiting bodies will be present.

    *Brown patch - This is a Rhizoctonia (soil-borne) fungus that is also favored by our weather conditions. Symptoms appear as roughly circular patches of thinned turf. Early AM inspection may show a smoky zone on the periphery of the patch.

    *Dollar spot - On typically cut home lawns the symptoms may first be seen as a cottony white growth of mycelium when a heavy dew is present. These mycelium may penetrate the leaf and cause infection. In the infected stage, the symptoms appear as straw or bleached spots 4 to 6 inches in diameter that may overlap each other. At the periphery of these spots, the individual grass blades will have straw colored bands across the blades with reddish-brown borders.

    *Helminthosporium Diseases - These are species of Drechslera and Bipolaris that cause many primary diseases of our cool-season grasses. These include leaf spot, melting out, netblotch, and brown blight. Water-soaked areas on the foliage soon become reddish brown to purple-black, and are often surrounded by yellowish zones that fade into the adjacent green tissue. In severe cases, the leaf tissue dies and causes the turf to appear thin. This is the usual progression of the leaf spots showing in spring turf that is followed by the melting out in summer, where the crown and root system of the grass plant is killed.

    *Pythium diseases - Also known as grease spot, or cottony blight. Pythium blight can destroy sections of turf in a 24 hour period under favorable conditions for disease development. The disease is usually most virulent when the temperatures are lingering in the upper 80's or lower 90's, and the weather is wet and humid. As with dollar spot, the first symptoms may be the cottony white growth with heavy dews, then as the grass dries, the growth disappears and the leaves collapse turning eventually, to a straw color. This disease is especially destructive where the turf is poorly drained and where air circulation is reduced by adjacent trees, shrubs, and buildings.

    *Slime Molds - are not disease organisms that infect the grasses, but are saprophytes that use the grass blades as a physical means to support their reproductive structures. The fungi appear as a greasy black, slimy growth, eventually changing from ashy gray to white growth that easily rubs off. Usually raking or hosing will take care of this problem.

    Major control of these diseases is accomplished first with nutrient control. Too much or too little nitrogen fertilizer can set the stage for disease establishment. Brown patch and pythium blight can be brought on by too much N; dollar spot and rust are most active in low N turfgrasses. Simple removal of the dew in the early AM will also help control these diseases. This can be done with a syringe cycle of the irrigation system, dragging the hose across the lawn, or the practice of polling the dew off the grass. Coring, which improves surface drainage, will contribute significantly to the reduction of turfgrass diseases.

    For those that wish to resort to fungicides, chlorothalonil (Daconil 2787) offers the best broad spectrum contract control, while a good systemic would be triadimefon (Bayleton).

    Where lawns are badly devastated by disease, overseeding can take place this next month with disease resistant cultivars, like Adelphi, Ram I, Touchdown, Enoble, Eclipse, and Glade.

Ron Smith
NDSU Extension Horticulturist and Turfgrass Specialist

 

RECYCLE PESTICIDE CONTAINERS

    It is illegal for commercial applicators to burn empty pesticide containers.

    Leaving the containers for your customers to dispose of is certainly not customer friendly and just passes the problem along. Taking properly rinsed containers to an approved landfill is a legal solution, but recycling makes more sense. Ostlund Chemical Company, UAP, and Cenex/Land O' Lakes will collect your pesticide containers this summer and recycle them at no cost to you. All containers destined for recycling need to be triple rinsed or pressure rinsed, and then inspected to be free from visible pesticide residues. The labels and caps also need to be removed. The schedule of dates, times, and locations for the collections follows.

Ostlund Chemical 1998 North Dakota Collection Schedule

Date

Time

Location

City

8/3
8/3
8/4
8/4
8/5
8/6
8/6
8/7
8/7
8/10
8/10
8/11
8/11
8/12
8/12
8/13

8-11
1-4
8-11
1-4
1-4
8-11
1-4
8-11
1-4
8-1
1-4
8-11
1-4
8-11
1-4
10-2

Ypsilanti Elevator
Wimbledon Grain
Larson Grain
Gwinner Elevator
Colfax Farmers Elev.
Clifford Farmers Elev.
Arthur Elevator
Ostlund
Ostlund
Reimers Seed
Helm Flying
Ostlund
Rolla Flying
FRS Shipping & Supply
Lakota Ag
Emmons County Shop

Ypsilanti
Wimbledon
LaMoure
Gwinner
Colfax
Clifford
Arthur
Drayton
Grand Forks
Carrington
Harvey
Rugby
Rolla
Edmore
Lakota
Linton

   August 10-14 - there will be a continuous collection at Ostlund Chemical Co., Mapleton. Hours will be 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Applicators may bring properly rinsed and clean containers to the collection locations at the times listed. They will be accepting 1, 2.5, 30, and 110 gallon plastic containers. No steel containers will be accepted. For more information contact Ostlund Chemical Company.

UAP 1998 North Dakota Collection Schedule

Date

Time

Location

City

7/28
7/28
7/28
7/29
7/29
7/29
7/30
7/30
7/30
7/31
8/18
8/18
8/18
8/19
8/19
8/19
8/20
8/20
8/20
8/21
8/21
8/21
8/22

8-10
11-1
2-4
8-10
11-1
2-4
8-10
11-1
2-4
8-4
8-10
11-2
3-5
8-10
11-1
2:30-4:30
8-10
11-1
2-4
8-10
11:30-1:30
2:30-4:30
8-5

Taylor Ag
Dakota Quality Grain
Poynter’s Ag Supply
Farmers Union Oil
Curt Undlin Company
Berthold Farmers Elev.
Farmers Union Oil
Sunprairie Grain
Dakota Quality Grain
UAP Big Sky Warehouse
Holliday Farmers Elev.
Dodge Farmers Elev.
Stone Mill Farms
Circle K Feeds
Dakota Grain
Air Dakota Flite
Scranton Equaity Elevator
Bowman Grain
Farmers Un. Equity Grain
Fitterer Oil
Beach Coop Elev.
Golva Coop Elev.
UAP Big Sky Warehouse

Watford City
Parshall
Sawyer
Newburg
Lansford
Berthold
Crosby
Bowbells
Ross
Williston
Halliday
Dodge
Richardton
Glen Ullin
Elgin
Hettinger
Scranton
Bowman
Rhame
New England
Beach
Golva
Dickinson

    Applicators may bring properly rinsed and clean containers to the collection locations at the times listed. They will be accepting 1, 2.5, and 30 gallon plastic containers. The 30 gallon plastic containers must be cut into at least four (4) smaller sections lengthwise. Containers will be not accepted if these guidelines are not met. No steel containers will be accepted. For more information contact UAP.

 

CENEX/LAND O' LAKES COLLECTIONS

    Applicators may bring properly rinsed and clean containers to the closest Cenex/Land O' Lakes cooperative before the last week of August. Then containers will be consolidated and ground and recycled in September. They will be accepting 1, 2.5, and 30 gallon plastic containers. The 30 gallon plastic containers should be cut in half. Cenex/Land O' Lakes will also accept intact properly rinsed metal 30 and 55 gallon containers. They should be properly rinsed and clean, dent free, and the bungs should be intact. If you have any questions contact Cenex/Land O' Lakes.

Andrew Thostenson
NDSU Extension Pesticide Coordinator


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