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FEEDING LIQUID WHEY IN SWINE FATTENING RATIONS

The disposal of liquid whey, a by-product of cheese manufacture in North Dakota cheese plants, has been a problem. Its resistance to decomposition in sewage systems has made it necessary to find other means as disposal. Its use as a fertilizer is of limited value. However, it can be used in swine feeding to provide necessary protein.

This trial was designed to investigate the use of liquid whey as a supplement in swine fattening rations. In this experiment, whey, soybean oilmeal and lysine are compared, as supplements to a basic barley and oats fattening ration. Pigs of two starting weights were used, and were fed in concrete drylot, and on winter wheat pasture. The pigs were started on whey gradually, and did not develop any scouring.

Picked up daily, the whey was stored in a fiber glass tank, and was self-fed in the sour form through a gravity flow system and nipple waterers. Those pigs receiving whey were not allowed water after the second week, their entire liquid intake coming from the whey. The whey was furnished at no cost by the Dickinson Cheese Company. A charge of cent per gallon was made to cover transportation costs.

Although the utilization of whey was impossible to measure accurately because of waste in feeding, it amounted to approximately 3.00 gallons per pig per day. This is an agreement with figures for liquid consumption as presented by the National Research Council.

The rations as they were fed and the cost per ton of finished feed is shown in table 7. Summer feeding trial results have been summarized in table 8. Table 9 summarizes results for three years.

Table 7 - Rations as fed, summer hog trials - 1975
Ingredient Ration Supplement
SBOM Lysine Whey
Oats, lbs. 200 234 236
Barley, lbs. 676 739 740
Soybean oilmeal, lbs. 100 --- ---
Lyamine, lbs. --- 3 ---
Minerals, vitamins1 24 24 24
Price/ton, $ 132 129 126
1Includes: Limestone 9 lbs., di-cal 9 lbs., trace mineral salt 5 lbs., vitamin B complex 1 lb., vitamin A, 14 gms. vitamin D3 and 180 gms. zinc sulfate per 1000 pounds feed.

 

Table 8 - Weights, gains and feed cost, summer hog trials, 1975
  Ration Supplement
Whey SBOM Lysine
Concrete:
Initial wt., lbs. 34 54 32 53 33 53
Final wt., lbs. 186 200 207 192 199 220
Gain, lbs. 152 145 174 138 166 166
Days fed 129 113 129 113 129 113
Avg. daily gain, lbs. 1.18 1.28 1.35 1.22 1.28 1.47
Feed/cwt gain, lbs. 273 287 371 369 408 384
Feed cost/cwt gain, $ 17.14 18.02 24.48 24.35 26.36 24.81
Pasture:
Initial wt., lbs. 33 53 32 54 32 53
Final wt., lbs. 201 196 231 223 216 218
Gain, lbs. 168 143 199 169 184 165
Days fed 129 113 129 113 129 113
Avg. daily gain, lbs. 1.30 1.27 1.54 1.50 1.43 1.46
Feed/cwt gain, lbs. 286 262 334 328 319 355
Feed cost/cwt gain, $ 17.96 16.45 22.04 21.65 20.61 22.93

 

Table 9 - Three year average for weight, gain and feed cost, 1973-75
  Ration Supplement
Whey SBOM Lysine
Initial wt., lbs. 35 51 34 51 35 51
Final wt., lbs. 190 205 200 211 192 217
Gain, lbs. 156 154 165 160 158 166
Days fed 127 117 127 117 127 117
Avg. daily gain, lbs. 1.22 1.31 1.30 1.36 1.24 1.42
Feed/cwt gain, lbs. 285 297 410 397 395 386
Feed cost/cwt gain, $ 14.49 14.89 20.78 19.85 20.74 20.41

Summary: Three years of data indicates that pigs can be raised to slaughter weights very efficiently and economically when using liquid whey as a protein supplement. Pigs that were fed whey required 100 pounds less feed per 100 pounds gain in 1975. Feed savings for the three year period amounted to 107 pounds less feed/100 pounds gain, which amounted to a savings of approximately $5.60/100 pounds gain over the soybean fed pigs and $5.80/100 pounds gain over the lysine supplemented pigs.

Liquid whey feeding will be most successful when the following conditions exist: whey is available on a regular basis; the pigs weigh at least 35 pounds; PVC plastic or stainless steel feeding equipment is used to reduce corrosion, contamination, fly, and odor problems; and adequate protection from the weather is provided.


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