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HOG FEEDING TRIALS ON CONCRETE AND PASTURE-1965

This trial compares pigs raised in pens with concrete floors and pigs raised on spring seeded winter wheat Pasture. Pigs were allowed 16 square feet each on concrete and 1/10 acre each on pasture.

Table 35. Results Concrete vs Pasture Trials - Spring 1965.
  Lot #1 Lot #2 Lot #3 Lot #4 Lot #1 Lot #2
Standard Standard Standard Standard (Full Feed Pasture)
Concrete Concrete Concrete Concrete Pasture Pasture
No. of Head 8 10 8 8 8 9
Average Initial Weight 67.9 41.4 43.3 43.3 68.3 40.4
Average Final Weight 240.9 203.1 179.1 183.4 235.8 195.6
Days on Feed 111 111 96 96 111 111
ADG 1.56 1.46 1.41 1.46 1.51 1.40
Feed/Hog/Day 7.72 6.37 6.57 6.57 7.06 5.56
Efficiency 4.95 4.36 4.66 4.50 4.68 3.97
Cost/CWT Pounds Gain $9.50 $8.37 $8.95 $8.64 $8.99 $7.62

Rations

Price/Pound 5% Soybean (Standard) No Supplement
1.67 Barley 310 $5.18 330 $5.51
1.75 Oats 155 $2.71 167 $2.92
4.50 Soybean Oilmeal 25 $1.13 --- $0.00
5.75 Di Cal 4 $0.23 --- $0.00
1.80 Limestone 5 $0.09 --- $0.00
2.50 Trace Mineral Salt 3 $0.08 3 $0.08
23.0 Zinc + Vitamin 1 $0.23 --- $0.00

Total

503# $9.65 500# $8.51

Cost/cwt

$1.92/cwt   $1.70/cwt

Results of this year's trial are summarized in the following table.

Table 36. Weight Gains and Costs of Gains of Pigs Raised on Concrete and Pigs Raised on Spring Pasture.
Pigs on: Initial Weight Final Weight Gain Days Fed Average Daily Gain Feed Per 100 Lbs. Gain Cost Per 100 Lbs. Gain
Concrete 48.5 210.7 153.2 104 1.47 449 $8.62
Pasture 53.5 214.5 161.0 111 1.45 432 $8.29

The pigs on concrete had a higher rate of gain and were fed for a shorter period of time. However, these pigs required 17 pounds more feed per 100 pounds gain at a cost of .33 more per 100 pounds gain than did the pigs on pasture. The pigs on concrete showed signs of stiffness and lameness especially as they reached market weights. They were somewhat softer in their finish than those raised on pasture. These conditions could result in a reduction in selling price under certain market conditions.

This trial shows that good pasture can account for a substantial saving in feed. This saving, plus the absence of lameness and a firmer finish favor the use of pasture where possible. These advantages may become even more important where rations are not adequately balanced for protein, vitamins and minerals, because pasture can supply many of these factors.


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