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ABSTRACTS OF RESEARCH IN LIVESTOCK INVESTIGATIONS - 1953
ABSTRACTS OF RESEARCH IN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY

LARKIN H. LANGFORD

WINTERING BEEF COWS AND BEEF CALVES:

Beef cows have been wintered for three successive winters on rations which contain only 3/4 as much T.D.N. and protein as recommended by the National Research Council. The cows lose weight over winter on a ration of 22 pounds corn silage and 7 pounds non-legume hay, but their weight is regained on good summer pasture. The number of calves born per lot has not yet been affected adversely by low winter rations; however, birth weight and weaning weight appear to be suffering slightly from the low winter rations of the dams.

Over a three period, calves that are wintered to gain about .45 pound per day have netted more money above feed cost after a summer on good grass than calves which gained .92 pound per day in winter. The average spread in weight after a summer of grazing has been 41 pounds per head in favor of the higher winter ration. These 41 pounds have cost more than 32 cents per pound in higher winter feed cost.

STEER FATTENING TRIAL:

Yearling steers weighing about 800 pounds on November 1 have been fed on two types of fattening rations for about five months. A ration of corn silage, crested wheatgrass hay, 5 pounds grain after 60 days, and 1 pounds soybean oil meal has produced gains of about 1 3/4 pounds per day. A second ration of about 11 pounds barley and oats with 12 to 15 pounds crested wheatgrass hay has produced gains of 1.6 pounds per day. There is little difference in the cost of the two rations, or in returns. Future work will attempt to improve and expand the corn silage ration because corn silage is a more dependable crop than grain in this area.

PASTURE CROPS AND METHODS OF FEEDING SPRING PIGS:

Over the three year period reported upon, alfalfa pasture has been superior to any of the five spring seeded crops in both rate and economy of gains on spring pigs. Gains in dry lot have been as low as on the poorest pastures, yet the cost of gains has been higher in dry lot than on any of the pasture crops.

A ration of barley and oats mixed 3:1 and pelleted proved far superior in rate of gains produced to the same ration ground, in one trial.

Hogging off corn has not produced good gains or cheap gains as compared to self feeding a barley and oats mixture in dry lot to heavy feeders.

FARM POULTRY FLOCK:

A high energy starter ration pelleted and fed for 12 weeks to White Rock cockerels without any other feed gave excellent results in 1953. White Rock cockerels for meat and White Rock pullets for eggs have consistently returned a profit during the three years we have had the Farm Poultry Flock.


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