Carrington Research Extension Center
North Dakota State University
NDSU Extension Service
North Dakota Agricultural Experiment Station

Ag Alert


6 May, 1999


TIMELY FIELD PEA PLANTING
It is important to plant field pea on a timely basis to maximize seed yield. As an example, the Carrington Research Extension Center conducted a field pea planting date trial in 1997-98. Four planting dates were used starting on May 1, 1997 and April 24, 1998 and planting intervals were about every two weeks. Average yield for planting dates one to four were 45.8, 29.3, 12.7, and 6.5 bushels per acre, respectively. In summary, if field pea have not been planted yet, the crop should be planted as soon as possible to minimize potential yield loss.

WHEAT SUSCEPTIBILITY TO MIDGE BASED ON PLANTING  DATES AND GDD UNITS
Wheat planted when about 200 growing degree day (GDD) units have accumulated, using a base temperature of 40 degrees F, will be heading at the time orange wheat blossom midge emerge. The following are dates, based on the ND Ag Weather Network, when selected south-central ND locations accumulated 200 GDD units:
Oakes = April 27, Linton = April 29, Edgeley = April 30, Bismarck and Jamestown = May 1, and Carrington and Harvey = May 2.
Thus, wheat fields planted on or after May 1 and until the date when 600 GDD units have accumulated, should be scouted at heading time for wheat midge. Additional details on obtaining GDD units for your area and wheat midge management may be obtained from NDSU Extension Service offices.

CRUSTED SOIL MANAGEMENT FOR PLANTED CANOLA  AND FLAX
Recent heavy rains have increased potential for crusted soils. Small-seeded crops such as canola and flax have difficulty emerging through crusted soils. Pre-emergence use of a rotary hoe or harrow can severely reduce canola and flax stands if the crop seed has germinated and the shoot is near the soil surface. For example, in a trial conducted at the Dickinson Research Extension Center during 1993-95, pre-emergence use of a rotary hoe or harrow reduced flax stands 14 to 18%. Possible solutions to the problem include use of an empty press drill to lightly break the crust and minimize injury to the tender plant shoots. Keep in mind that a minimum and uniform stand of 3 to 4 plants per square for canola or 30 plants per square foot for flax may provide adequate yield potential.


Greg Endres, Area Extension Specialist/Cropping Systems, Email: gendres@ndsuext.nodak.edu
1999 Ag Alert Archive * Carrington R&E Center Home Page * NDSU Agriculture