North Dakota State University

A Report of Agricultural Research and Extension in Central North Dakota

volume 40 December 1999The Carrington Research Extension Center was established to conduct research designed to enhance the productivity, competitiveness and diversity of agriculture across central North Dakota. Specifically, the Carrington Center conducts a research and outreach program that addresses dryland and irrigated crop production methods and systems, identification of adapted crop species and superior cultivars, intensified cow/calf production techniques, beef cattle rations, bison nutrition, sustainable agricultural production, integrated crop and livestock systems, aquaculture, and propagation and distribution of foundation seedstocks. The objective is to discover the balance between profitability and conservation of our natural resource base. Study results are disseminated to the entire state through an ongoing extension educational program.



The Carrington Research Extension Center is responsible for research on all aspects of agriculture impacting a wide region of central North Dakota. The climatic conditions inherent to the Carrington area as defined by major soil type, annual precipitation, and temperature patterns are important because they represent a major sector within the state. This environment allows the research program to effectively address problems in agriculture and convey research findings to a significant part of North Dakota. A wide diversity of both traditional and alternative crops are adapted to this region. The Carrington Center research effort is one of the few programs positioned to address field crops and livestock issues in one location. The bison nutrition research project is the latest program being developed at the Center in response to constituency needs. In addition, a research effort is underway at the Northern Aquaculture Center to study alternative aquaculture species and alternative crops as food sources for fish. The Center's foundation seedstocks project typically produces and has available for distribution, seedlots representing at least eight crops, 20 varieties and 14,000 bushels annually.



Research Highlights from 1999

Overview of 1999 Wheat Fusarium Head Blight Fungicide Trials 3

Crop Rotation Simulation with Methyl Bromide 3

Response of Oat Varieties to Seeding Rate and Nitrogen Fertilizer 4

Canola Response to Sulfur (S) Fertilization 5

IR-4 Program for Registration of Minor-use Pesticides 7

Response of Sunflower to Nitrogen Fertilizer 7

Costs and Returns Associated with Canola Production in Southeast North Dakota 9

Field Peas in Creep Feed for Beef Calves 11

Field Peas in Diets for Growing and Finishing Steer Calves 11

A Comparison of Soybean, Canola, Solvent and Expeller Crambe Meal as Protein Sources for
Growing and Finishing Feedlot Steers 11

Combining Cows and Crops for More Sustainable Family Farms and Ranches 12

Identifying Calves with Superior Growth and Carcass Traits through a Feedout Contest 12

Developing a Calf to Meat Marketing System in Central North Dakota 13

Adding Value to Sprouted Grains through Feeding to Beef Cattle 13

Highlights from the Survey of Manure Management Practices in North Dakota 14

A New Project - Using Coal Combustion By-products for Feedlot Surface Stabilization 14

Environmental Programs for Pork Producers 15

Testing Soybean Meal in Tilapia Diets 15

Future Aquaculture Research at North Dakota's NAC 16

Weather Summary 19

Agronomic Research Trials 20

Crop Variety Comparison Data

1999 Variety Comparison Field Trial Information 17

Hard Red Spring Wheat 22

Durum Wheat 27

Barley 29

Oats 31

Canola 33

Borage 36

Crambe 36

Mustard 37

Camelina 37

Safflower 38

Buckwheat 38

Flax 39

Winter Rye 39

Spring Triticale 40

Proso Millet 40

Field Pea 41

Lentils 43

Soybeans 43

Dry Edible Beans 45

Corn 47

Non Oilseed Sunflower 49

Oil Sunflower 50

Cool-Season Forages 53

Warm-Season Forages 54

Overview of 1999 Wheat Fusarium Head Blight Fungicide Trials

B. Schatz, G. Endres, and S. Johnson

Four fungicide trials were conducted at the Carrington Center in 1999 to continue the multi-state cooperative efforts to manage Fusarium head blight (FHB), scab, in small grain. The trials included:



The trials were established under center-pivot irrigation to provide an environment of increased incidence of Fusarium head blight. 'Kulm' HRS wheat was planted May 13 on 1998 spring wheat ground. Most fungicide treatments were applied at early-flowering with a backpack sprayer equipped with 8002 twin-jet nozzles at a spray angle of 30 degrees from vertical. FHB incidence and head severity, as well as flag leaf disease, were visually evaluated. Grain yield and other seed characteristics including DON (vomitoxin) were determined.



The uniform fungicide trial was conducted as a multi-state project. At Carrington, FHB field severity ranged from 2.2 to 6.3 percent. Nearly all fungicide treatments did not reduce FHB field severity compared to the untreated check, but flag leaf disease was generally reduced with fungicides. Most fungicide treatments improved grain yield 10 to 16.3 bushels per acre compared to the untreated check.



The fungicide application techniques included Folicur and Quadris applied at spray volumes of 20 or 30 GPA and at spray pressures of 30, 45, or 60 PSI. No differences were found among individual treatments with FHB or wheat performance. Means averaged across fungicides and spray pressures indicated a yield advantage of 2.5 bushels/acre with the spray volume of 20 GPA compared to 30 GPA. Means averaged across fungicides and spray volumes indicated a grain yield increase of about 2 bushels/acre with a spray pressure of 60 PSI compared to 30 or 45 PSI.



The Novartis fungicide application timing and rates study showed that fungicide applications made prior to the beginning of first flower were not effective in suppressing scab. The study showed that three different treatments made at early-flowering resulted in significant grain yield increases as compared to the untreated check. Each of the fungicide treatments that resulted in increased yields were tank-mixes of fungicide and either a non-ionic surfactant or a crop oil.



The BASF fungicide study provided evidence that timing an application at the first flower is more effective than applications made at 50 percent heading. There were a number of treatments that caused a significant increase in grain yield. However, there was no definitive pattern that would associate this yield increase with application timing or rate of product. This trial also showed that these fungicides were very effective in controlling leaf spot diseases even though the application timing was later than normally advised for specific control of leaf diseases.



Specific trial data is available upon request.

Crop Rotation Simulation with Methyl Bromide

G. Endres, T. Becker, and R. Ashley

A demonstration project was conducted in 1999 at the Carrington Center and in the New Rockford area to simulate the importance of crop rotation for managing soil-borne disease in wheat. Research has indicated 5 to 10 percent grain yield reduction from root and crown disease in continuous small grain and small grain-fallow sequences. Soil fumigation with methyl bromide is a demonstration tool to assess the effect of root and crown disease on small grain yield and quality. The methyl bromide simulates a recommended crop rotation where a broadleaf crop is grown between small grain crops. The soil fumigation is not physically or economically practical for farmers to use to control soil disease. Demonstration sites were selected that had two or more years of continuous small grain production. Plot size was 18 by 25 feet. Soil was fumigated with methyl bromide before wheat was planted. 'Munich' durum at Carrington and 'Gunner' HRS wheat at New Rockford were grown under recommended production management practices.



Results of the demonstration are listed in the following table. Head number was greater and plants were shorter in the methyl bromide treated plots compared to untreated plots. Also, wheat grown in the treated plots reached maturity earlier compared to untreated areas (data not shown). The data indicate seed yield and quality were greater in the methyl bromide treated plots compared to untreated plots, although root measurements indicated little difference between treated and untreated plots. Generally adequate soil moisture during the growing season likely reduced the impact of soil diseases on wheat performance in the demonstration. Also, leaf and foliar disease may have reduced the positive grain yield and quality impact expected with the methyl bromide treatment.

Wheat response to soil fumigated with methyl bromide, Carrington and New Rockford, 1999.

Treated Untreated
Heads (number/yard of row)

116

92
Plant height (inches)

34

36
Seed yield (bu/acre)

37.8

36.3
Test weight (lb/bu)

58.2

57.3
Protein (%)

16.9

15.9
1000 kernel weight (grams)

7.25

6.67
Sub-crown internode color (1-4)a

3

3
Root color (1-4)a

2.5

3.0
Root mass (1-4)b

2.5

2.5

aSub-crown internode and root color: 1=white, 4=dark brown/black.

bRoot mass: 1=dense, 4=few.



Response of Oat Varieties to Seeding Rate and Nitrogen Fertilizer

B. Henson, M. McMullen, and B. Schatz

Developing recommendations for optimum seeding rate and nitrogen (N) fertility for oat production is essential to maximize grain yield and quality and economic returns. However, due to variation in environments and varieties, these recommendations are difficult to determine. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effects of N fertilizer rates and seeding rates on plant development and economic performance of three oat varieties in central North Dakota.



The study was conducted at the Carrington Research Extension Center during the 1998 and 1999 growing seasons. Soil N levels (soil test NO3-N + spring-applied urea) were calculated for yield goals of 80, 110, and 140 bushels/acre. Varieties Jerry, AC Assiniboia, and CDC Boyer were planted at seeding rates of 0.75, 1.00, and 1.25 million pure, live seeds/acre on April 30, 1998 and May 17, 1999. The N and seeding rates bracketed the normal yield goal and plant population for the Carrington area. The three varieties planted are of almost entirely different genetic backgrounds and represent early (Jerry), medium (CDC Boyer), and late (AC Assiniboia) maturities.



The combined, two-year analysis of variance showed statistically significant differences for year, cultivar, and the year x cultivar interaction for almost all parameters measured (Table 1). Population effects were significant for all variables except whole oat protein percent, percent plump kernels, and groat percent. The effect of N was only significant for lodging and whole oat protein concentration. The difference between years may be explained by the difference in planting date and the contrasting precipitation in the two years (the 1998 season was exceptionally dry, while 1999 was relatively wet).



Averaged over the two years, AC Assiniboia lodged less than Jerry and CDC Boyer, yielded more, and produced generally higher-quality grain. Grain yield of the varieties was similar in 1998, but increased dramatically for AC Assiniboia in 1999 while decreasing in Jerry and CDC Boyer. Kernel weight among cultivars and years showed a similar trend to yield. The superior performance of AC Assiniboia in the more humid 1999 season may be due to a relatively higher level of crown rust resistance. Increasing plant population tended to reduce days to heading and height. Higher populations also resulted in more lodging, higher yield, and improved grain quality. Higher N rates resulted in higher lodging scores and whole oat protein concentrations, but did not significantly affect the other parameters measured. The lack of response to N in 1998 may have been due to the dry growing conditions, while high subsoil N may have precluded a response in 1999.



Conclusions

Yield and test weight increased with population, but not with N rate. Increased seeding rates may be a viable tool to achieve higher economic returns.



Contrasting cultivars responded in a similar fashion to the treatments imposed, suggesting that these results may be extrapolated over a fairly wide range of germplasm.



Partial support for this research was provided by the Quaker Oats Company.
Table 1. Main effects of seeding rate and N rate on agronomic and quality traits of three oat varieties.





Treatment


Days to Heading



Lodging Score





Height



Grain Yield



Test Weight

250 Kernal Weight

Whole Oat Protein



Plump Kernels





Groat

1 - 91 inches lbs/acre lbs/bu grams % % %
Variety
Jerry 56.0 4.9 37 2696 36.3 6.57 12.7 89.4 73.9
AC Assiniboia 60.5 1.4 39 3603 36.3 8.49 12.8 96.2 79.4
CDC Boyer 59.5 3.1 41 3059 34.3 8.07 12.5 95.9 77.4
LSD (0.05) 0.2 0.2 1 92 0.3 0.16 <0.1 0.6 0.3
Seeding Rate (million pure live seeds/acre)
0.75 58.8 2.9 40 2885 36.6 7.61 12.6 93.5 76.9
1.00 58.8 3.2 39 3162 36.8 7.72 12.6 93.9 76.8
1.25 58.5 3.3 38 3311 37.0 7.81 12.7 94.0 77.0
LSD (0.05) 0.2 0.2 1 92 0.3 0.16 NS NS NS
N Rate (lbs total N/acre for yield goals of 80, 110, and 140 bushels/acre)
110 58.6 2.9 39 3147 36.8 7.72 12.4 93.9 76.9
152 58.7 3.1 39 3147 36.8 7.75 12.7 94.0 76.9
193 58.6 3.3 39 3066 36.7 7.66 12.9 93.6 76.9
LSD (0.05) NS 0.2 NS NS NS NS <0.1 NS NS
Year
1998 61.8 1.1 35 3070 36.8 7.87 13.2 94.2 79.1
1999 55.6 5.2 43 3168 34.5 7.56 12.1 93.5 74.7
LSD (0.05) 0.6 0.2 3 NS 0.7 0.23 0.1 NS 0.6
11 = erect, 9 = flat; 2NS=non-significant difference



Canola Response to Sulfur (S) Fertilization

B. Schatz, E. Deiber, and B. Henson

The canola plant has a relatively high demand for sulfur (Franzen, 1997). Since fertilizer applications frequently lack this element, deficiencies in the field are not uncommon. This experiment was conducted on a low-S soil to evaluate the response of canola (Hyola 401) to 20 and 40 pounds S/acre in combination with 120 or 220 pounds total soil N/acre. Fertilizer formulations of S were also compared.



The application of 20 pounds S significantly increased test weight and yield, but no additional response was observed at the 40-pound rate (Table 1). Increasing the N rate from 120 to 220 pounds/acre extended the bloom duration and days to physiological maturity, but did not influence yield or grain quality (Table 2). Neither S nor N significantly affected days to beginning bloom, height, or lodging (data not shown).



Applying S in a readily available form (ammonium sulfate) consistently improved yield compared to the control (Table 2). Commercial S fertilizers varied in effectiveness, with Kmag equal to ammonium sulfate, Tiger 90 less effective, and Sulfur 95 intermediate. Less soluble, elemental sulfur products (e.g. Tiger 90 and Sulfur 95) are useful for longer-term treatment. However, the response during the first season after application will likely be less than from formulations containing sulfur in a more readily available form for plant uptake.



The application of 20 pounds S/acre in a readily available form is recommended for canola fields where an S deficiency is anticipated.



Franzen, D. 1997. Fertilizing mustard and canola. NDSU Extension Service Bulletin SF-1122. North Dakota State University, Fargo. 4 p.

Table 1. Mean responses of canola to sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N) treatments, 1998.



S


N
Bloom Duration Physiological Maturity

Test Weight
Kernal Weight

Yield
lbs/ac lbs/ac Days DAP1 lbs/bu g/200 lbs/ac
0 - 21.8 81.1 50.0 .62 2038
20 - 21.5 1.1 51.7 .65 2591
40 - 21.6 80.8 51.9 .64 2560
LSD (.05) NS2 NS 1.0 NS 306
LSD (.01) NS NS 1.3 NS 424

1DAP = days after planting; 2NS = non-significant difference





Table 2. Growth and yield responses of canola to sulfur (S) and nitrogen (N), 1998.



S


N


Nutrient Source
Bloom Duration Physiological Maturity

Ht.
Test Wt. Kernal Wt.

Yield
lbs/ac lbs/ac Days DAP1 cm lbs/bu g/200 lbs/ac
20 120 AS2 + Urea 21.0 80.2 103 51.5 .66 2498
40 120 AS + Urea 21.0 79.2 101 52.0 .63 2540
20 220 AS + Urea 22.0 82.0 104 51.9 .64 2685
40 220 AS + Urea 22.2 82.2 111 51.7 .64 2581
20 120 Tiger 90 + Urea 21.5 80.2 92 50.3 .62 2001
40 120 Tiger 90 + Urea 21.5 80.2 97 50.5 .62 2095
10+103 120 Tiger 90 + Urea + AS 21.2 79.2 101 51.8 .62 2361
20+203 120 Tiger 90 + Urea + AS 21.2 79.2 104 52.0 .63 2404
0 120 Urea 21.8 80.2 99 50.3 .63 2081
0 220 Urea 21.8 82.0 99 49.8 .62 1996
20 120 Sulfur 95 + Urea 21.2 79.8 96 50.8 .61 2210
40 120 Sulfur 95 + Urea 21.8 80.0 102 50.6 .63 2231
20 120 Kmag + Urea 21.0 79.0 107 52.0 .64 2497
40 120 Kmag + Urea 21.5 79.5 106 51.8 .65 2557
Mean 21.5 80.2 102 51.2 .63 2338
CV% 2.2 1.7 5.5 1.4 5.7 11.9
LSD (.05) .7 1.9 8 1.0 NS 398
LSD (.01) .9 2.4 11 1.4 NS 533

1DAP = days after planting; 2AS = ammonium sulfate; 3S applied as 50:50, Tiger 90:AS



IR-4 Program for Registration of Minor-use Pesticides

B. Henson , Ph.D.

The high expense incurred by agrochemical manufacturers in registering pesticides is not cost-effective for crops grown on a limited acreage. To fill this void, the U.S. government finances the IR-4 program, headquartered at Rutgers University in New Jersey, with regional offices around the country (Michigan State University in the North Central Region). Based on input from growers' organizations and research institutions, candidate projects (pesticide-crop combinations) are prioritized. Researchers then select and conduct projects. The pertinent crop products (grain, meal, oil, forage, etc.) are analyzed for pesticide residues at approved testing laboratories and reports are submitted to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which approves or disapproves registration.

All phases of these projects must be conducted within Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) standards, which are quite rigorous. Designated quality assurance personnel monitor project sites, which are subject to EPA audits. Detailed records are required for every step of the process: field site, condition of the test substance upon arrival, storage conditions, calculation of the amount of product to apply, calibration of weighing and application equipment, product application, crop grown, harvesting, storage and shipment of the harvested crop, and laboratory analysis. The amount of paperwork is not for the faint of heart. However, the effort is justified, especially in North Dakota, where so many alternative crops are grown on a relatively small acreage.



In 1999, after several years of hosting projects conducted by NDSU personnel from Fargo, the Carrington Research Extension Center (CREC) became a certified site for IR-4 projects. An IR-4 coordinator was designated and the first project (sethoxydim on borage) was conducted. Quality assurance personnel from Fargo and Michigan State University visited CREC before and during the field trial and also participated in an EPA audit.



This season has marked the beginning of direct CREC participation in this important program. Suggestions for future projects are always welcome.

Response of Sunflower to Nitrogen Fertilizer*

B. Schatz, B. Miller, S. Zwinger, and B. Henson

* Adapted from "Sunflower response to nitrogen fertilizer." Proceedings of the 21st Sunflower Research Workshop, Fargo, ND, 14-15 January 1999. p. 193-97.

In an environment of high production costs and low grain prices, efficient use of inputs is essential for maintaining economic viability of farming operations. Application of excessive amounts of nitrogen (N) fertilizer may reduce profitability and create groundwater pollution hazards. On the other hand, yield responses to N frequently make this technology cost effective, but determination of the optimum level of fertilizer is necessary to maximize profit.



Current North Dakota fertility recommendations for sunflower suggest 5 pounds N/cwt. yield goal (Dahnke, 1994). Thus, a 2,000 pound yield goal would require 100 pounds of total N (soil test nitrate-N + credit for a previous legume crop + applied fertilizer). However, experiment station trials sometimes show no yield benefit from N fertilization of sunflower and usage under production conditions varies greatly. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of N fertilizer on sunflower yield and soil nitrate-N levels and the influence of tillage practices on these effects.



Sunflower data were analyzed from the Spring Wheat - Sunflower - Barley - Fallow rotation in a long-term cropping systems experiment, which was initiated in 1987. Fertilizer N levels (see below) and tillage practices (conventional, reduced, no-till) were arranged in perpendicular strips. Sunflowers were planted in 30" rows and managed to maximize yield by optimizing P fertility and pest control. Fall soil samples from two replicates were analyzed for nitrate-N concentration. Yield was measured on all three replicates.



Fertility Treatments (lbs N/acre)

Low

Medium

High

1987-1990 30 60 90
1991-1997 0 40 80



Soil Nitrate-N Level (0-24")

Averaged across years, a nearly linear increase in fall soil nitrate-N concentration was observed with increases in the level of spring N fertilizer (Table 1). Over the nine years covered by data, N fertilization not only increased yield (see below), but improved the N-status of soil for the next crop in the rotation.



Tillage practice had essentially no effect on fall soil nitrate-N level within a given year (data not shown). Averaged across years, significantly lower nitrate concentration in the no-till plots was likely due to uptake by weeds, which were more prevalent in this system. Higher water accumulation in these high-residue plots may have contributed to increased N losses by leaching.



Comparing the average fall nitrate-N values for years 88-90 (relatively low rainfall) with those for 93-95 (relatively high rainfall) points out the susceptibility of soil N to leaching and denitrification. The range of 4.3 to 47.3 pounds/acre stresses the importance of annual soil sampling to quantify the N-status of fields.



Yield

In most years, sunflower yield increased slightly with increases in N fertilization, but differences were not statistically significant (Table 2). However, the average across years shows an incremental increase in yield with applied N and the differences among treatments are highly significant.



In some years, significant yield reductions were observed in the no-till treatment (Table 3). These differences are attributed to inferior weed control in these plots, which will become less of a limiting factor as more post-emergence herbicides are labeled for use in sunflower. Yields under minimum tillage and conventional tillage were statistically similar in all nine years, which indicates the possibility of reducing tillage costs without affecting yield.



Dahnke, W.C. 1994. Fertilizer recommendations. p. 11-12. In D.R. Berglund (ed.) Sunflower Production. Extension Bulletin 25 (revised), North Dakota State University, Fargo. 98 p.

Table 1. Effect of N Fertilization on Soil Nitrate-N Levels (ppm, 0-24") in Sunflower,

NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center, 1988-1997.

N Fertilizer Applied LSD LSD

Year Low Medium High Average (0.05) (0.01)

1988 24.2 34.8 88.8 47.3 29.7 43.2

1989 22.9 43.2 53.0 39.7 NS1 NS

1990 5.9 30.5 22.3 18.9 10.2 14.9

1992 3.2 4.0 12.0 6.4 3.3 4.8

1993 3.2 4.1 5.4 4.3 NS NS

1994 2.7 3.6 8.9 5.0 4.1 5.9

1995 3.1 3.1 8.1 4.8 2.1 3.1

1996 3.8 7.1 25.5 12.1 8.5 12.3

1997 3.1 8.5 26.8 12.8 10.9 15.9

X 8.0 15.1 27.9 17.0 4.4 5.8

1NS = non-significant difference



Table 2. Effect of N Fertilization on Yield (lbs/acre) of Sunflower,

NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center, 1988-1997.

N Fertilizer Applied LSD LSD

Year Low Medium High Average (0.05) (0.01)

1988 1098 1328 1430 1285 NS1 NS

1989 1250 1277 1154 1227 NS NS

1990 1615 1753 1603 1657 NS NS

1991 1548 1594 1632 1691 NS NS

1992 777 785 897 820 NS NS

1993 650 708 858 739 NS NS

1995 1061 1110 1598 1257 206 284

1996 1537 1879 2099 1838 320 441

1997 696 745 868 770 NS NS

X 1137 1242 1349 1243 103 137

1NS = non-significant difference





Table 3. Effect of Tillage Practices on Yield (lbs/acre) of Sunflower,

NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center, 1988-1997.

--------------------- Tillage--------------------- LSD LSD

Year No Till Minimum Conventional (0.05) (0.01)

1988 986 1430 1440 NS1 NS

1989 1076 1254 1352 NS NS

1990 1803 1670 1498 NS NS

1991 1470 1732 1572 NS NS

1992 202 1070 1187 195 268

1993 463 794 960 272 375

1995 619 1655 1496 206 284

1996 1918 1682 1915 NS NS

1997 287 1051 971 235 324

X 980 1371 1377 103 137

1NS = non-significant difference



Costs and Returns Associated with Canola Production in Southeast North Dakota

S. Metzger

Introduction

As area producers look to new and different crops to fill an economic void left by the present low net returns of traditional cereal crops, the use of crops such as canola will only continue to increase. A key factor for producers to determine for canola is the actual net return per acre and per hundred-weight of production. The opportunity for economic success with any crop is always enhanced by the operator's ability to discern the true cost of production and the proper placement of the crop within the total cropping system.



Procedure

Data for this study was compiled through the North Dakota Farm Business Management Education Program. The data summarized in this report was generated from fields operating under a land cash rental arrangement. This arrangement was selected because the total annual land charge is more recognizable in this format as opposed to land operated under share crop or total ownership scenarios.



The data was collected over a four year period from 1995 through 1998. The minimum acreage involved in any one year was 656 acres with a maximum of 4,632 acres. The four year total of 9,511 acres came from a total of 58 farms. The minimum number of farms involved in any one year was seven and the maximum was 21 farms. The area from which the data was collected included that from south of Highway 2 to the South Dakota border and from the eastern edge of the Missouri River to the western edge of the Red River Valley. The data collected from within a 60-mile radius of the Carrington Research Extension Center made up approximately 50 percent of the total involved in the four year study. Other Farm Business Management Education Programs collecting data during the four-year period included programs in Bismarck, Enderlin, Jamestown, Napoleon, Oakes, and Valley City.



Data was collected from individual operator's field record books or computer programs. It must be acknowledged that although producers are encouraged to use scale tickets and assembly sheets for determining yield data, some producers may have indicated quantities produced based on bin measurements. The annual costs and returns for canola on cash rented land were published as part of the Farm Business Management Annual Report for Region III of North Dakota and as part of the Carrington Area Farm Business Management Annual Report for each of the corresponding years.



Results

The four year total average gross income per acre, including the canola value, gross insurance incomes, and any loan deficiency payments (LDP), is $159.34 with an average yield of 1,311 pounds per acre and a value of $11.87 per cwt. (Table 1).



Over the four year period the average gross income ranged from $135.73 to $186.88 per acre. The average total expense is shown at $137.63 per acre with direct costs accounting for $113.64 and overhead or fixed costs at $23.98 per acre. The four year average net return is calculated to be $21.71 per acre or $1.66 per hundred-weight of production. As a note of comparison, the four year average net return for hard red spring wheat, calculated in the same format over the same time frame and not including the AMTA payments was $3.17 per acre. The average net return for canola ranged from a minus $1.05 to a positive $55.81 per acre with the annual cost of production ranging from $9.12 to $11.38 per cwt. It is important to note that these average costs and returns are based on an average of the four years of canola production data. As annualized costs and returns were being sought for this report, the average numbers for each year were not tied to the specific number of acres for each year. The final two years, 1997 and 1998 accounted for 83 percent of all the acres included in the study and may have greatly affected the results had a weighted average been used. Table 1. Canola income and expenses for 1995-1998 (Per acre basis)

Number of Farms 58

Total Acres 9,511

Yield per acre in pounds 1,311

Value per cwt. (including LDP) $11.87

Total canola value 155.60

Misc. income per acre (basically crop insurance) 3.74

Gross income per acre 159.34

Direct Costs

Seed 18.71

Fertilizer 19.28

Chemical 13.52

Crop insurance 7.59

Fuel and oil 6.03

Repairs 9.06

Custom hire 3.00

Land rent 31.51

Miscellaneous .23

Operating interest 4.74

Total Direct Costs $ 113.64

Return over direct costs $ 45.70

Overhead Costs

Hired labor $ 3.23

Machinery & building leases 2.29

Farm insurance 1.23

Utilities 1.26

Dues & professional fees .21

Interest 3.85

Machinery & building depreciation 10.13

Miscellaneous 1.80

Total Overhead Costs $23.98



Total Costs per Acre $ 137.63

Net Return per Acre $ 21.71

Total Direct Costs per Cwt. $ 8.67

Total Costs per Cwt. $ 10.50

Net Return per Cwt. $ 1.66

Breakeven Yield in Pounds 1,128

Some number totals may appear slightly off due to computer rounding of numbers.



Field Peas in Creep Feed for Beef Calves

V. L. Anderson, Ph.D.

In a two year study with 128 cow/calf pairs, wheat midds and field peas were offered in four different combinations as creep feeds. Treatments were reciprocal amounts of dry rolled peas and pelleted wheat midds at 0-100 percent, 33-67 percent, 67-33 percent, and 100-0 percent, respectively. Feed intake increased (P<.01) with an increasing level of field peas in the diet. Calves offered 100 percent midds consumed 5.89 pounds of creep feed per day compared to 8.72 for calves offered 100 percent field peas during the 56 day study. Calf gains increased (P=.06) from 2.82 pounds per day at 0 percent peas to 3.17 pounds at 67 and 100 percent peas. Gains from 33 percent peas averaged 3.11 pounds per day. Feed efficiency decreased (P=.02), however, with increasing pea levels. At 0 percent peas, calves gained .48 pounds for each pound of feed consumed followed by .49, .42, and .38 pounds, respectively for 33, 67 and 100 percent peas. At $2.20/bu for peas and $60/ton for midds, feed costs per pound of gain tended to increase with increasing pea level associated with increased intake and decreased feed efficiency: $.063, .065, .083, and .103 respectively for 0, 33, 67, and 100 percent peas. The added value of gain over feed costs was greater at 67 percent peas at $10.83 per head compared to 0 percent peas. Field peas appear to be a very palatable feed and can be used effectively in creep rations. At higher levels of field peas, feed cost must be considered in relation to return from added calf weight for optimum profit. Peas are biologically useful and economically profitable when used as a major ingredient in creep feeds.

Field Peas in Diets for Growing and Finishing Steer Calves

V. L. Anderson, Ph.D.

Field peas were evaluated in a 2-year growing and finishing study with feedlot steers. Preconditioned steers (n=80) were fed growing diets containing barley and canola meal or field peas. Corn silage, chopped hay, and supplements were included in the rations during the 50-day trial. Steers fed peas consumed more feed as a percent of body weight (P<.10) and had numerically greater gains than steers fed barley. The barley-canola meal diet was intermediate.



Finishing diets based on barley or peas were fed from the end of the growing study until steers reached market weight. Intake tended to be greater (4.7%) for the pea diet compared to barley with corresponding higher (5.5%) gains observed. Carcass traits were similar except marbling scores and the percent choice were greater (P<.10) for steers fed peas. Peas are very palatable when used as the only grain source in growing and finishing steer diets. Feed costs are a critical factor in using peas in feedlot diets. Producers should make decisions on feeding peas based on local feed prices and projected cost of gain.

A Comparison of Soybean, Canola, Solvent and Expeller Crambe Meal as Protein Sources for

Growing and Finishing Feedlot Steers

V.L. Anderson, Ph.D.

Feedlot performance and carcass traits were compared in a 150-day growing and finishing trial using preconditioned crossbred steer calves (n=128, avg wt = 795 12.2 lbs). Diets were formulated for equal crude protein using soybean meal, canola meal, solvent and expeller crambe meal. Dry matter intake was greater (P<.10) during growing for soybean (22.15 lb/hd/day) and canola meal (22.61) compared to expeller crambe meal (20.57). Solvent crambe meal (21.42) was intermediate. For the entire feeding period, no intake differences (P>.10) were apparent. During growing, gains from solvent crambe meal (3.58 lb/hd/day) were less (P<.10) than canola meal (4.19) with soybean meal (4.05) and expeller crambe meal (3.67) intermediate. No differences (P>.10) in gain were observed when the entire feeding period was compared. Gains per unit of feed were similar (P>.10) throughout both periods and overall. Carcass traits were similar (P>.10), except dressing percent was lower (P<.10) for solvent crambe meal (61.4%) compared to canola meal (63.0) with soybean meal (62.9) and expeller crambe meal (62.2) intermediate. Percent choice and carcass value numerically favored expeller crambe meal. Expeller crambe meal produced equal or greater animal performance and carcass value when compared to solvent crambe meal, soybean meal, and canola meal as a protein source for feedlot cattle during growing and finishing.

Combining Cows and Crops for More Sustainable Family Farms and Ranches

V.L. Anderson, Ph.D.

Specialize or diversify? That question should be on the minds of every farmer/rancher in the state. The answer lies in the available resources and the potential improvements to the bottom line. Diversifying income sources is one method of managing risk. Considering that much of the state is cropped and beef cows are spread relatively evenly throughout the state, it is not much of a reach to add crop residues and co-products to beef cow diets. Beef cows are fed for 4-6 months each winter anyway. On a state-wide scale, it is possible to double the number of beef cows in North Dakota if we would utilize a larger portion of crop residues (stover and straw) and co-products in cow diets. Rangeland is a finite resource. We can manage grass more carefully, but the feed resources with much greater potential for increasing livestock numbers are residues, co-products and feedgrains. More beef cows and feedlots would add value to underutilized feed resources.



Straw, chaff, and stover are the most abundant residue feeds. Balanced with a few pounds of supplement from grain or co-product feeds, highly cost-competitive rations can be formulated. Data from several trials at the Carrington Research Center proves that beef cows can be fed a wide variety of feedstuffs and perform at their genetic potential. Palatable diets of low cost ingredients balanced to requirements make for economical production. Many North Dakota feedstuffs are undervalued and underutilized. A high percentage of the co-products produced in North Dakota are shipped to other states or countries. How can other livestock operations afford to transport these co-products thousands of miles and still find them economically feasible?



Feed barley is traditionally undervalued and can make a very economical and compatible supplement for high residue beef cow diets. A series of circulars on feeding barley to beef, dairy, sheep, and swine is being published. Nearly 1,000 tons of wheat midds are produced daily at several plants from Minot to Hankinson. Summer prices are very low for this seasonally demand-driven feedstuff. A new NDSU Extension Circular "Wheat Middlings: A Useful Feed for Cattle" (AS1175) is recommended for further reading. Potato waste is less mobile but available in huge amounts throughout the year. Screenings of all kinds are produced and sold at salvaged prices. Barley malt pellets from two very large malt houses are an excellent feed. These and other co-product feeds are described in more detail in an NDSU Extension Circular "Alternative Feeds for Ruminants" (AS-1182).



Limited grazing land, the wide variety of useful low-cost feedstuffs, and the management skills of our cattle producers provide the basis for more integrated crop/livestock operations. Efficient and economical use of these resources can result in sustainable and profitable farms. Specialized farms worked at one time. Diversification seems to be a more logical approach now.

Identifying Calves with Superior Growth and Carcass Traits through a Feedout Contest

K.F. Hoppe, R. Danielson and D. Hildebrandt

Identifying superior cattle genetics and providing education on their impact is the goal of the steer feeding contest. In conjunction with the North Dakota Winter Show, a Performance Steer Classic - Pen Division competition was developed for multiple consignments of three or four calves. After a feeding period where calves are fed in a common pen, the calves will be shown in groups of three at the ND Winter Show and harvested for collecting carcass data. Cattle groups are ranked based on feedlot and carcass performance.



Calves consigned to the contest are required to have a minimum of 3.0 pounds of weight per day of age at delivery to the feedlot and be born between January 1 and April 30, 1999. Steers must weigh an average of 1050 pounds at the end of the feeding period on March 1, 2000, to be included in the competition. Calves will be ultrasounded for backfat thickness, ribeye area and marbling prior to an open house on February 10, 2000, at the NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center Livestock Unit. During the open house, owners will select three calves for the pen-of-three competition.



Winners in the pen competition will be based on the best score obtained by the pen-of-three steers. Scores are determined by weight per day of age (25% of score), average daily gain on test (25% of score), retail product value per day of age (40% of score), and pen uniformity index based on variation within the pen for retail product (10% of score). The ND Winter Show will provide cash awards for the top five placing pens.



All feedlot, carcass and scoring information will be provided to the consignors. The open house and exhibition at the ND Winter Show will provide consignors and other cattle producers the opportunity to visually compare cattle against weights and ultrasound measurements.

Affiliation of coauthors and non-CREC staff: R. Danielson, NDSU Associate Professor, Department of Animal and Range Sciences, D. Hildebrant, Manager, ND Winter Show.

Developing a Calf to Meat Marketing System in Central North Dakota

K.F. Hoppe, P. Kallenbach and A. Aldayel

Cattle producers are continually searching for markets that compensate more than traditional markets. Previously, the Central Dakota Cattle Association arranged semi-load lots of backgrounded cattle for marketing directly to feedlots. The cooperative also finances member's cattle to help increase the number of cattle backgrounded or finished in central North Dakota. Recently, the cooperative has looked at developing a market through a proposed local packing plant.



The Dakota Hallal Processing Company is proposing to develop a meat processing company in central North Dakota. The slaughter and processing business will focus on marketing hallal meat products for Muslims. Currently, there are relatively few large processors of hallal meat products in the United States and Canada. The marketing study indicates consumer demand and a rapidly growing market potential.



The directors of the Central Dakota Cattle Association have expressed interest in partnering with the Dakota Hallal Processing Company. Central Dakota Cattle Association is forming another entity, Central Dakota Beef, LLC to purchase 50 percent of Dakota Hallal Processing Company. Through this limited liability company's partial acquisition of Dakota Hallal Processing Company, cattle producers are vertically integrating and seeking to become a sole source of supply for fed cattle and cows.



Reduced market distance, decreased marketing fees, and premium prices for above-average cattle are benefits for cattle producers to market locally. Cattle producers are vertically integrating their businesses from producing cattle to producing meat products. Consequently, the ownership in the processing company should return dividends or increases in share value.



The Dakota Hallal Processing Company and Central Dakota Beef, LLC are presently in the development phase and are not currently selling stock. However, the Dakota Hallal Processing Company is currently approved to be "testing the waters."



Affiliation of coauthors and non-CREC staff: P. Kallenbach, President, Central Dakota Cattle Association, A. Aldayel, Manager, Dakota Hallal Processing Company.

Adding Value to Sprouted Grains through Feeding to Beef Cattle

K.F. Hoppe, Ph.D.

Wet weather during August and September created temperature and weather conditions that favor germination and sprouting of small grains prior to harvest. Sprouted grains are subjected to severe price discounts because sprouted grains are considered as dockage. Sprouted grains can retain most of the feeding value of non-sprouted grains when fed to livestock.



Previous research conducted at NDSU (Circular AS-647 December 1975) compared the feeding value of 20 percent sprouted durum (58.6 lbs./bu.), 40 percent sprouted durum (56.7 lbs./bu.), 20 percent sprouted hard red spring wheat (57.4 lbs./bu.), and 40 percent sprouted hard red spring wheat (56.0 lbs./bu.). Average daily gain and feed efficiency were equal or superior to the barley based control diet.



Weather conditions that lead to sprouting are also conducive for mold growth. Moldy feeds may lead to poor overall health, abortion or other symptoms due to the toxins produced by various molds. Beef cattle appear to be somewhat able to ingest certain molds without deleterious side effects. Questionable feeds can be analyzed for mold toxins by a diagnostic laboratory.



For feeding backgrounded calves, sprouted grains could be used at levels similar to the non-sprouted grains. For example, a simple diet to attain 2 pounds per day gain could contain 50 percent hay and 50 percent grain. A 600 pound calf might consume 18 pounds of feed daily where 9 pounds would be from grain. To adapt calves to sprouted grains, the grain mix could be 50 percent normal grain and 50 percent sprouted grain. Once the calves are adapted to the diet (3-14 days), sprouted grains could be included at a higher percent of the grain mix.



For supplementing cows, part of the grain mix could be substituted with sprouted grain. Although 50 percent sprouted grain in the mix is a reasonable starting point, up to all of the grain mix could be sprouted depending on feed quality. Moldy feed should be avoided during gestation since mycotic abortion can occur.



Sprouted grains may also contain a high percent of weed seeds and chaff. Consequently, a feed analysis should be conducted to determine the actual value of the harvested grain. Through feeding sprouted grains to beef cattle, most of the value of the grain can be retained and priced accordingly to other livestock feeds.

Highlights from the Survey of Manure Management Practices in North Dakota

S. Birchall

A phone survey of 354 North Dakota livestock producers (beef, dairy, and swine) was completed during February 1999. The objectives of the survey were to assess the level of adoption of Best Management Practices (BMPs) relating to manure management and to identify issues that future extension efforts need to address. The questions were grouped into the following categories: classifying the operation; collection, storage and handling practices; nutrient budgeting; carcass disposal; and assistance needs. Results were grouped according to species, as well as whether the operation had an "approval to operate" from the Department of Health.



The survey highlighted producers' management strengths as well as areas where improvement is needed. In the following areas, producers deserve commendation:



  • The high participation rate in soil testing manure application areas.
  • The focus on spreading manure outside of winter months.


The following points are areas in which producers should be considering changes:

  • Constructing new or enlarging existing manure storage facilities (particularly producers without an "approval to operate").
  • Having manure analyzed for nutrient content.
  • Keeping records of manure spreading operations.


While it is most important for producers to adopt practices that minimize the risk of pollution, a significant number of medium-sized producers (200 to 1,000 Animal Units) also need to make efforts to secure an "approval to operate." Community concerns will only be alleviated by producers showing that their industry is complying with the state's regulations.



The survey results indicate some critical information needs that must be met by people providing information and assistance to North Dakota's livestock producers. Agencies must work to raise the level of awareness regarding environmental regulations to ensure that producers are able to assess their compliance and, if they need to make changes, whether they can get technical or cost share assistance.

A New Project - Using Coal Combustion By-products for Feedlot Surface Stabilization

S. Birchall

Livestock producers in North Dakota are seeking a low-cost alternative to placing concrete in feedlots. Earthen pens and lane-ways do not withstand concentrated livestock traffic during extended wet periods such as spring thaw. As the integrity of the pen or lane-way surface breaks down, deep mud and poor drainage reduce animal performance and health, increase odor emissions and prevent regular maintenance operations such as manure removal. Commonly, the soil/manure interface layer is damaged resulting in deeper leaching of nutrients and an increased risk of groundwater pollution.



Sufficient evidence exists to suggest that using Coal Combustion By-products (CCBs) can lead to significant improvements in pen and lane-way conditions. Work performed at the Energy and Environmental Research Center indicates that several lignite coal ashes are suitable for use in feedlot surfacing - either in constructing a concrete-like surface or in stabilizing the existing soils. However, CCB properties vary with the source of the material and the suitability of a specific CCB for feedlot surfacing must be investigated before placement.



A new project to demonstrate the use of North Dakota lignite coal ash for surfacing feedlots will begin in 2000. The criteria evaluated in the demonstration will include engineering and environmental performance as well as the economics of procuring the materials and placement techniques. The plan is to demonstrate up to four different surface types at the NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center Bison Research Facility. It is anticipated that some of the surfaces will have properties similar to concrete for use in the feeding/watering areas. Other surfaces will be designed to provide a "softer," more soil-like surface that provides drainage and support for cleaning equipment. Feed roads will be surfaced with lignite bottom ash. In the second year of the project, two or three livestock producers in other parts of the state will have the opportunity to trial promising CCB treatments.



The participants in this proposed effort are the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center, North Dakota State University Carrington Research Extension Center, the NDSU Department of Agricultural & Biosystems Engineering, and several North Dakota utilities and ash marketers.

Environmental Programs for Pork Producers

S. Birchall

There is no sense in reinventing the wheel. So when the National Pork Producers Council developed two programs to assist pork producers to resolve their waste management concerns, NDSU Extension's Livestock Waste Technical Information and Assistance Program supported their use in North Dakota.



The earlier program is the Environmental Assurance Program (EAP). As part of the program, manuals are available covering pollution prevention strategies, record keeping, management of manure storage and treatment structures, proper land application of manure, manure nutrient planning, emergency action plans and community relations. The material is discussed during intensive, half-day or day-long workshops. The curriculum was developed by the nation's leading university extension specialists and private engineers.



The On Farm Odor/Environmental Assistance program became available to North Dakota producers in 1999. The program was designed to provide pork producers with a tool to objectively assess the management of the environmental side of their operation. Trained engineers and technicians make detailed observations of an operation's buildings, equipment, manure storage and handling structures, and a detailed assessment of the producer's manure management, nutrient plans, overall maintenance, and emergency action plans, where appropriate. The assessment provides producers with a third party, neutral report that identifies specific areas where odor and environmental management could be improved.



Twenty-two North Dakota assessors (NDSU Extension, Natural Resource Conservation Service and private consultants) have been certified by NPPC to carry out these assessments. To date, nine operations have volunteered for the program. The assessment is provided free of charge and all information and observations are strictly confidential.

Testing Soybean Meal in Tilapia Diets

P. Jarvis

Aquaculture, the production of aquatic species such as finfish, shellfish and aquatic plants in a controlled environment, is the fastest growing segment of agriculture in the U.S. (report by the USDA).



American consumers spend more than $46 billion each year on fish and shellfish. This total includes about $31 billion purchased in food service establishments, and about $15 billion in retail stores. The thousands of firms which produce, process and distribute the fish and shellfish, contribute more than $24 billion to the U.S. Gross National Product. In 1980 U.S. production was 203 million pounds with a farm gate value (commodity price) of $192 million. By 1990, U.S. production had quadrupled to nearly 860 million pounds valued at $760 million.



On average Americans today consume 14.9 pounds of seafood each year. This compares to about 10.3 pounds per person in 1960 and 12.5 pounds per person in 1980. Most of the increased interest in seafood is due to the rise in health consciousness. Seafood is low fat, easily digestible, and a good source of protein, minerals, and vitamins.



Due to the ever-growing demand for aquaculture products the search is ongoing to find high-quality food sources for aquaculture livestock. Most important is the discovery of high quality, highly palatable protein sources. The Northern Aquaculture Center believes it has found that protein in soybeans.



Recently NAC completed a feed trial using soybean meal as the primary source of protein in Tilapia diets.



Weight gain and feed conversion ratios (FCR) were compared in an 84-day feeding trial using all male Tilapia nilotica fingerlings stocked at an average body mass of 2.88 g (.10oz) each. This trial was designed to examine the differentiation in feed conversion and weight gain that would occur by varying the quantity and type of soybean meal used in the feed formulations.



The diets formulated were designed to incorporate either expeller or hexane-solvent extracted soybean meal as the primary source of protein. The diets can be categorized as either expeller or hexane-solvent extracted (solvent extracted). Within the two soybean meals, the diets were further divided into three subsets each. Each subset consisted of varying amounts of soybean meal (SBM). Diets 1, 2, and 3 had 50 percent, 40 percent, and 30 percent solvent extracted SBM, respectively. Diets 4, 5, and 6 had 50 percent, 40 percent, and 30 percent expeller SBM, respectively. The target protein level for each diet was 36.2 percent.



The fish were stocked into 18 circular tanks (three replicates for each of the six diets), each with a capacity of 681 liters (180 gallons). Each of the replicate tanks was self-contained and independent of the others (having its own filtration). Temperature of each tank was maintained by thermostat-controlled submersible heaters and adjusted to maintain a mean water temperature of 28 C (82.4 F). Each of the 18 tanks was stocked with a sample number of 65 individuals (n=195/diet) (total n=1170). Initial weights were recorded as total weight of fish per tank. Fish were fed to satiation twice daily. Small amounts of feed were repeatedly offered during a period of time until fish no longer accepted additional feed (feed was seen floating uneaten in each tank). Fish were considered satiated when no more feed was accepted during any one feeding. The feedings occurred once in the morning and once in the afternoon. Weight of feed was recorded after the afternoon feeding. The total weight of feed given was recorded on a daily basis.



Fish were weighed initially on May 5, 1999 and again on June 16, 1999, June 30, 1999 and conclusively on July 29, 1999. Weights were recorded as weight of fish per tank. The final trial weights were analyzed using the Student-Newman-Keuls (SNK) test for variable: GROWTH. SNK results showed a significant difference between diets 2 and 6. Diet 2 had a mean growth of 85.367g (3.01oz.) and diet 6 had a mean growth of 58.100 (2.05oz.). An SNK was also performed on the Feed Conversion Ratios (FCR) with a mean of 1.13333 for diet 6, solvent extracted SBM, and a mean of 0.98000 for diet 2, expeller SBM. Results of the trial indicate that solvent extracted SBM diets (diets 1, 2 and 3) provided greater weight gain and better FCR than did the expeller diets (diets 4, 5 and 6). Future Aquaculture Research at North Dakota's NAC

P. Jarvis

Because of the deterioration of net returns being paid to tilapia farmers, NAC is actively looking at alternative species coupled with alternative crops to create a stronger and more competitive aquaculture community in North Dakota.



Criteria for selection of alternative species would include marketability, cost of production and net return, ease of culture and availability of seed stock. NAC is also searching for species which could be fed a diet composed primarily of locally grown crops such as soybean, field peas, lentils, sunflower and others.



In the future NAC will be examining a number of new and innovative projects such as yellow perch culture in North Dakota and a number of other alternative species, such as freshwater lobster and ornamental fish.



There currently exists a deficit of 30 million pounds of yellow perch in the Great Lakes region. This is due to the high popularity of the fish and due to over fishing the natural perch fisheries in the Great Lakes. The wholesale price for perch fillets is more than $9 per pound with an average production cost of about $2.30 per pound. Perch may reach market size of 12 oz in about 12 to 14 months when reared indoors.



NAC is also actively searching for alternative uses of crops for feed additives and protein sources for the ever-increasing aquaculture market. NAC is continually looking for means of increasing the net profit for the aquaculturist.



NAC is beginning a new research project utilizing bluegill sunfish and hybrid sunfish, which are produced by crossing a male bluegill with a female green sunfish. The study will help determine which is most suitable for culture, which reaches market size first and which fish are the most feed efficient. Sunfish have been determined to be of economic interest as food fish.



The outlook for aquaculture in North Dakota is bright so long as producers are willing to be innovative and flexible in selection of cultured species. North Dakota can be on the cutting edge of new species market development and culture methods.



















1999 Variety Comparison Field Trial Information



------Soil-----
Available Fertility Soil Test + Applied


Field Trial


Location
Previous Crop

pH


OM


N


P


K
Row Spacing Seeding Rate/Acre Planting Date Harvest Date
% ---------lbs/ac--------- in
Borage Dryland Wheat 6.9 3.0 127 32 600 7 20 lbs May 28 Sept 20
Buckwheat Dryland Wheat 6.9 3.0 127 32 660 7 50 lbs May 28 Sept 9
Camelina Dryland Wheat 6.9 3.0 127 32 660 7 5 lbs May 28 Aug 16
Camelina (winter) Dryland Barley 7.4 3.4 115 14 260 7 5 lbs Sept 22 July 28
Canary Seed Dryland Field Pea 7.2 3.2 164 68 660 7 45 lbs April 27 Aug 19
Conventional Canola Dryland Wheat 6.9 3.0 127 32 660 7 **4.5-10 lbs April 30 Aug 10-25
Roundup Ready Canola Dryland Wheat 6.9 3.0 127 32 660 7 **4.5-10lbs May 3 Aug 17-20
Chickpea Dryland Wheat 6.6 3.5 35 20 640 7 **78-189 lbs May 17 Oct 25
Crambe Dryland Wheat 6.9 3.0 127 32 660 7 20 lbs May 19 Aug 16
Emmer Dryland Field Pea 7.2 3.2 164 68 660 7 100 lbs April 27 Aug 19
Field Pea Dryland Wheat 6.9 3.0 127 32 660 7 **79-285 lbs May 4 Aug 19-25
Lentil Dryland Wheat 6.6 3.5 35 20 640 7 **40-70 lbs May 13 Sept 7
Lupin Dryland Wheat 6.6 3.5 35 20 640 7 250,000 PLS May 13 Sept 28-30
Mustard Dryland Wheat 6.9 3.0 127 32 660 7 **8-12 lbs May 19 Aug 19
Proso Millet Dryland Field Pea 7.2 3.2 164 68 660 7 25 lbs June 3 Sept 9
Rye (Spring) Dryland Field Pea 7.2 3.2 164 68 660 7 1,200,000 PLS April 27 Aug 19
Rye (Winter) Dryland Barley 7.4 3.4 152 14 260 7 75 lbs Sept 22 Aug 10
Safflower Dryland Wheat 6.9 3.0 127 32 600 7 27 lbs May 19 Oct 4
Sorghum, Grain Dryland Soybean 7.4 3.0 173 78 820 30 96,000 PLS June 3 Oct 25
Triticale (Spring) Dryland Field Pea 7.2 3.2 164 68 660 7 1,000,000 PLS Apr 26 Aug 20
Triticale (Winter) Dryland Barley 7.4 3.4 152 14 260 7 90 lbs Sept 22 Aug 10
Legumes were treated with recommended inoculum when availalbe.

** Various seeding rates due to different plant types or seed size within a crop.

1999 Variety Comparison Field Trial Information



------Soil------
Available Fertility

Soil Test + Applied



Field Trial


Location
Previous Crop

pH


OM


N


P


K
Row Spacing Seeding Rate/Acre Planting Date Harvest Date
% ---------lbs/ac--------- in
Barley Dryland Field Pea 7.2 3.2 164 68 660 7 1,200,000 PLS April 27 Aug 3
Barley Irrigated Wheat 7.7 3.6 104 40 540 7 1,200,000 PLS April 28 Aug 5
Barley Wishek Fallow 6.2 4.5 79 16 400 7 1,200,000 PLS May 25 Aug 20
Barley Dazey Wheat -- -- -- -- -- 7 1,200,000 PLS May 27 Not harvested
Barley(recrop) Dryland Wheat 7.4 2.9 137 61 420 7 1,200,000 PLS April 23 July 30
Durum Dryland Field Pea 7.2 3.2 164 68 660 7 1,200,000 PLS April26 Aug 23
Durum Irrigated Wheat 7.7 3.6 104 40 540 7 1,200,000 PLS April 28 Aug 25
Durum Wishek Fallow 6.2 4.5 79 16 400 7 1,200,000 PLS May 25 Sept 10
Durum Dazey Wheat -- -- -- -- -- 7 1,200,000 PLS May 27 Aug 31
Durum(recrop) Dryland Wheat 7.4 2.9 137 61 420 7 1,200,000 PLS April 23 Aug 11
Flax Dryland Wheat 6.9 3.0 127 32 600 7 40 lbs May 17 Sept 8
Forages-Hay (cool) Dryland Soybean 7.4 3.0 113 78 820 7 Various May 17 July 9-15
Forages-Hay (warm) Dryland Soybean 7.4 3.0 113 78 820 7 Various May 28 July 27-Sept 21
Forages-Hay (warm) -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

2nd cutting

Sept 22

Oats

Dryland

Field Pea

7.2 3.2 164 68 660 7 1,200,000 PLS April 26 Aug 10
Oats Wishek Fallow 6.2 4.5 79 16 400 7 1,200,000 PLS May 25 Aug 20
Oats Dazey Wheat - - - - - 7 1,200,000 PLS May 27 Not harvested
Oats (recrop) Dryland Barley 7.4 2.9 137 61 420 7 1,200,000 PLS April 23 Aug 9
Wheat Dryland Soybeans 7.4 3.0 163 78 820 7 1,200,000 PLS April 26 Aug 16
Wheat Irrigated Wheat 7.7 3.6 104 40 540 7 1,200,000 PLS April 28 Aug 24
Wheat Wishek Fallow 6.2 4.5 79 16 400 7 1,200,000 PLS May 25 Sept 10
Wheat Dazey Wheat - - - - -- 7 1,200,000 PLS May 27 Aug 31
Wheat (recrop) Dryland Wheat 7.4 2.9 137 61 420 7 1,200,000 PLS April 23 Aug 9
Wheat (Winter) Dryland Barley 7.4 3.4 152 14 260 7 75 lbs Sept 22 July 30
Corn Dryland Soybean 7.4 3.0 183 78 820 30 *20,000 Apr 30 Oct 20
Corn Irrigated Wheat 7.7 3.6 174 40 540 30 *28,000 Apr 30 Oct 21
Dry Bean Dryland Wheat 6.9 3.0 127 32 600 30 **70,000-90,000 May 19 Sept 16-24
Dry Bean Irrigated Wheat 7.7 3.6 104 40 540 30 **70,000-90,000 May 19 Sept 16-24
Soybean Dryland Wheat 6.9 3.0 127 32 600 30 150,000 PLS May 26 Oct 7
Soybean Irrigated Wheat 7.7 3.6 104 40 540 30 150,000 PLS May 26 Oct 8
Sunflower (Oil) Dryland Wheat 6.6 3.5 125 20 640 30 *20,000 May 26 Oct 13-14
Sunflower (Conf) Dryland Wheat 6.6 3.5 125 20 640 30 *16,000 May 20 Oct 6
Legumes were treated with recommended inoculum when available.

* Overplanted and thinned to indicated plant population.

** Various seeding rates due to different plant types or seed size within a crop.



Weather Summary

Monthly Temperatures (F) and Normals

----------Max Temp----------- -----------Min Temp----------- ------Monthly Avg. Temp.-----
Month 1999 Norm 1997 1998 1999 Norm 1997 1998 1999 Norm 1997 1998
Apr 52 52 45 60 32 28 24 36 42 40 34 48
May 65 66 66 70 45 40 39 45 55 53 52 57
June 73 75 78 70 54 51 54 50 64 63 66 60
July 79 81 78 82 57 56 57 55 68 69 68 68
Aug 78 80 79 83 54 53 53 57 66 66 66 70
Sept 64 68 73 76 43 42 46 47 54 55 59 61
Avgs: 69 70 70 73 48 45 45 48 58 58 58 61
Normals = 1961-1990 averages





Monthly Precipitation (in) and Normals
Month Monthly Precip Normal Percent of Normal 1997 1998
Apr 2.31 1.62 143% 2.80 0.89
May 4.51 2.19 206% 0.61 1.68
June 3.81 3.48 109% 1.60 1.79
July 2.41 2.76 87% 3.37 1.37
Aug 4.42 2.01 220% 1.45 1.40
Sept 1.35 1.73 78% 0.71 0.74
Totals:

18.81

13.79 136% 10.54 7.87
Normals = 1961-1990 averages





Monthly Growing Degree Days and Normals
-----------Wheat GDD----------- ----Sunflower GDD---- -----------Corn GDD-----------
Month 1999 Norm 1997 1998 1999 1997 1998 1999 Norm 1997 1998
Apr 349 331 241 494 --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
May 722 680 646 794 384 354 463 254 268 249 329
June 951 938 1024 835 593 664 509 424 420 494 358
July 1117 1143 1114 1134 745 742 763 549 574 560 579
Aug 1064 1071 1058 1184 692 690 812 511 514 509 616
Sept 653 710 832 890 338 502 565 219 282 368 419
Totals 4856 4873 4915 5331 2752 2952 3112 1957 2058 2180 2301
Normals = 1961-1990 averages




Growing season GDD Totals and Killing Frost Dates

Year

Frost Date

Corn Temp (F) Total GDD Frost Date Sunflower Temp (F) Total GDD
1997 Sept 20 28 2043 Oct 20 23 2992
1998 Sept 21 31 2205 Oct 13 26 2912
1999 Sept 30 26 1957 Sept 30 26 2548
Total corn GDD = May 1 to frost date
Total sunflower GDD = May 20 to frost date



Agronomic Research Trials

The following information is a listing of other agronomic research that was conducted at the Carrington Research Extension Center in 1999. The list is provided to illustrate specific research issues that are being addressed by CREC and other NDSU research staff. The listing briefly describes the trial and indicates project leaders and/or collaborators. Results of this work are normally available at some later date. Numbers in parentheses indicate the number of trials conducted, followed by project leaders and/or collaborators.



Germplasm Evaluation/Cultivar Development

Alfalfa: Trials to evaluate alfalfa varieties, age of stand, and harvest technique (3); Meyer (NDSU)

Barley: 2-row plant breeder nurseries; Franckowiak (NDSU)

Barley: 6-row plant breeder nurseries; Horsley (NDSU)

Canola: Preliminary nursery; Integra/CREC

Chickpea: Regional breeder nursery; Muehlbauer (WSU/USDA)/CREC

Durum: Uniform Regional Durum Nursery (2); Elias (NDSU)/CREC

Durum: Scab tolerant variety evaluation; DGPC/CREC

Field Pea: Regional breeder nursery; Muehlbauer (WSU/USDA)/CREC

Flax: Evaluation of fiber flax varieties; Carter (NDSU)/CREC

Flax: Plant breeder nurseries; Hammond (NDSU)

Kenef: Trials to evaluate varieties and adaptation (2); NDSU/CREC

Lupin: Head row selections; CREC

Lupin: Seed increase planting; CREC

Oats: Uniform Midseason Oat Nursery; McMullen (NDSU)/CREC

Oats: Breeders nursery; McMullen (NDSU)

Sorghum: Evaluation of early maturing lines; Andrews (Univ. of NE)/CREC

Soybean: Evaluation of high protein varieties; CREC/Ag Canada

Wheat: Advanced breeder nursery; Frohberg(NDSU)

Wheat: Scab tolerant variety evaluation; CREC/Kolden (Oregon)

Wheat: Uniform Hard Red Spring Wheat Regional Nursery; Anderson/CREC

Winter Wheat: Advanced breeder nursery; CREC

Winter triticale breeder nursery; CREC/Kolden (Oregon)

Crop Fertility Research

Formulation and application of inoculant and N and P fertilizer in field pea; CREC/DREC

Inoculation/nitrogen fertility management in soybean; CREC

Evaluation of micronutrient fertility strategies for sunflower production; TJ ENTERPRIZES/CREC

Influence of nitrogen level, plant population, and cultivar on oat quality and yield; Quaker Oats/McMullen/CREC

Inoculation/nitrogen fertility management with field pea; CREC

Sunflower response to Boron fertilization; CREC/Franzen (NDSU)

Nitrogen and genotype evaluation trial of white wheat; Peel (NDSU)/CREC

Impact of water management and N fertility on dry bean performance; CREC, Grafton/Steele (NDSU)

Impact of water management and N and P fertility on carrot performance; CREC, Lee/Steele (NDSU)

Impact of water management and N fertility on potato performance; CREC, Lorenzen/Steele (NDSU)



Crop Rotation Research

Long-term cropping systems trial evaluating rotations, tillage, and fertility; CREC



Plant Pathology Research

Fungicide evaluations in wheat; CREC

Evaluation of fungicides for suppression of scab in spring wheat; CREC/BASF

Evaluation of fungicides for leaf spot control in spring wheat; CREC/BASF

Wheat and barley cultivar susceptibility to prevalence of stem rust; Miller (USDA)

Fungicide application techniques in wheat; McMullen (NDSU)/CREC

Evaluation of fungicides for control of sclerotinia in dry bean (2); Venette (NDSU)

Variety response to fungicides for suppression of scab (4); CREC

Evaluation of micro-nutrients for control of sclerotinia in dry bean (2); Venette(NDSU)

Fungicide rate splits and timing for control of scab in wheat; Novartis/CREC

Uniform fungicide trial for control of scab in wheat; McMullen(NDSU)/CREC

Evaluation of sclerotinia nursery in dry bean; CREC/Grafton (NDSU)

Sclerotinia management in broadleaf crops; CREC

Methyl-Bromide Crop Rotation; McMullen/CREC

Evaluation of sclerotinia control in borage; CREC/NCREC



Weed Control Research

Evaluation of herbicide tolerance and weed control for field pea; CREC

Corn herbicide efficacy trial (2); CREC/Zollinger (NDSU)

Screening of herbicides for broadleaf weed control in spring wheat; CREC/

Dry bean weed control with soil- and post-applied herbicides; BASF/American Cyanamid/CREC

Evaluation of a broadleaf herbicide for canola production; Dupont/CREC

Evaluation of herbicides for wild oat and foxtail control in wheat; CREC/Nalewaja(NDSU)

Evaluation of Liberty-Link herbicide applications in canola (2); Agrevo/CREC

IR-4 evaluation of herbicide applications in borage; CREC

Herbicide sulfur interaction in canola; CREC

Weed control evaluation in dry bean; CREC/BASF

Herbicide tolerance in field pea, lentil, and chickpea; CREC

Evaluation of herbicides for grass control in sunflower (2); Dupont/CREC

Evaluation of tank mixes for wild mustard and wild oat in sunflower; BASF/CREC

Wild buckwheat control in HRS wheat; CREC/Ostlund



Entomology Research

Effect of sunflower planting date on sunflower beetle activity; CREC/Charlet(NDSU)

Evaluation of seed quality and insecticide-fungicide treatments in canola; CREC/Interstate Payco





Crop Management Research

Effect of planting date on canola performance; Langdon RC/CREC

Evaluation of forage harvest timing on quality of millet and oat hay; CREC

Effect of harvest timing on borage seed yield and quality; Johnson(NDSU)/CREC

Effect of planting date on borage, camelina, and calendula performance; Johnson(NDSU)/CREC

Evaluation of electrostatic seed sizing on wheat, flax and crambe performance; CREC

Effect of delayed harvest on sunflower yield and quality; Johnson(NDSU)/CREC

Dormant seeding in canola; CREC

Effect of seed size, planting depth, and seeding rate in canola; CREC

Effect of planting date and seeding rate in chickpea; CREC

Effect of stand age and stubble height in alfalfa; Meyer (NDSU)/CREC

Quality deterioration in dry bean; CREC/Hellevang (NDSU)

Canola Herbicide Strategies; Johnson (NDSU)/CREC

Comparison of row spacing, plant population, and seed type in dry bean; CREC

Evaluation of variety, planting date and rate, and row spacing in soybean; CREC

Sunflower desiccant trial; CREC/Johnson (NDSU)

Evaluation of planting population and date in short stature sunflowers; CREC



Hard Red Spring Wheat - Dryland Carrington
1997 - 99 Averages


Variety
Days to Head Plant Height

Protein
1000 Kwt Test Weight Grain Yield

Protein
Grain Yield
in % gms lbs/bu bu/ac % bu/ac
Conventional
AC Abbey 59.3 30.8 14.7 27.5 55.2 35.0
AC Barrie 62.8 34.2 16.2 30.2 58.6 42.8 16.4 46.9
AC Intrepid 58.5 30.3 15.0 31.8 57.4 40.1
Amidon 63.5 35.9 14.9 28.5 57.9 47.5 15.5 51.9
Butte 86 59.8 34.4 16.2 32.9 59.1 50.7 15.9 54.9
Coteau 67.0 38.4 15.4 27.9 57.3 45.6 16.1 47.4
Dandy 60.0 30.7 14.0 32.7 59.1 40.1
Glupro 65.5 39.9 18.3 31.6 56.2 37.2 18.8 35.2
Gunner 65.5 34.3 15.3 26.9 59.8 47.1 16.1 52.3
Ingot 58.8 33.5 15.4 28.4 60.7 47.5 15.3 54.0
Keene 62.3 36.7 15.4 26.3 58.1 43.5 15.8 52.7
Kulm 58.8 34.4 16.0 30.0 59.4 49.4 16.1 52.5
Majestic 66.0 36.3 16.7 30.6 57.7 46.3
McVey 62.8 31.8 14.1 29.5 55.8 54.5
Mercury 60.0 25.2 15.6 31.1 57.3 45.6
Parshall 60.3 35.5 15.9 29.8 60.5 50.3 16.3 51.9
Prodigy 64.0 37.8 17.0 27.3 57.9 30.1
Russ 61.3 33.9 15.5 30.7 58.8 51.4 15.4 57.8
Sharp 58.8 33.2 15.1 30.4 59.0 44.0 15.4 50.6
Sharpshooter 59.8 32.5 15.1 31.0 59.7 46.2 15.3 52.3
Stoa 63.0 36.7 15.4 24.8 54.8 40.8 15.5 50.2
Terra McKenzie 60.3 35.3 14.9 28.0 60.0 53.8
Trenton 61.3 36.9 15.7 32.5 59.1 54.3 15.8 56.8
Semi-Dwarf
2370 59.8 28.1 15.3 28.2 57.9 42.7 15.4 56.5
2371 62.0 30.0 15.3 30.6 56.8 42.2 15.8 49.2
2375 59.8 30.5 15.1 30.4 58.1 47.6 15.2 52.5
2398 63.0 30.5 14.4 29.2 56.2 41.6 15.1 47.3
Argent 60.8 33.0 16.4 31.6 59.1 36.9
Aurora 64.3 26.8 15.4 26.9 55.9 46.1
Ember 59.8 33.7 14.9 30.4 59.9 55.3
Forge 58.0 32.2 14.7 28.1 58.4 44.6
Grandin 61.0 32.4 15.8 32.4 59.2 43.9 15.9 49.8
Gus 63.5 31.9 16.0 24.7 55.6 42.1 16.2 46.0
HJ98 61.5 30.4 15.0 27.5 57.3 53.7 14.8 56.4
Hager 62.5 29.7 15.7 30.9 57.4 44.2
Hamer 61.3 28.5 14.7 29.2 56.7 46.2 15.1 52.0
Ivan 64.5 29.2 13.7 28.9 57.4 51.4
Lars 62.5 25.1 14.2 27.0 54.7 40.8 14.8 49.0
Len 66.0 32.1 16.1 27.9 55.6 37.4 15.8 43.2
Nora 60.3 25.1 15.6 30.1 57.1 37.4 16.4 42.1
Oxen 59.3 31.3 14.5 29.2 58.4 55.2 15.0
Reeder 61.3 32.6 15.3 29.6 58.5 55.0 15.3 59.5
Verde 62.3 29.3 14.4 30.9 58.2 51.2 14.6 52.3
Mean 61.8 32.4 15.5 29.4 58.0 45.8 -- --
C.V. % 1.5 4.9 4.8 6.7 2.0 15.9 -- --
LSD .05 1.3 2.2 1.0 2.7 1.6 10.1 -- -

Planting Date: April 26, 1999; Harvest Date: August 16, 1999; Previous Crop: Soybean

Hard Red Spring Wheat - Dryland Recrop Elite Carrington
1997-99 Average




Variety
Days to Head

Plant Height


Lodging Score


Leaf Disease


1000 Kwt


Test Wt




Protein


Grain Yield




Protein


Grain Yield
in 0-9 % gms lbs/bu % bu/ac % bu/ac
2370 63.8 34.4 0.0 84 26.1 58.8 13.6 46.2
2375 62.5 33.7 2.3 88 30.7 59.7 13.2 45.8 14.2 42.5
AC Barrie 65.0 37.2 1.3 66 30.4 60.0 15.3 43.1 15.6 40.5
Amidon 64.8 39.7 2.0 16 29.9 58.5 14.1 44.0 14.8 44.7
Argent 63.3 35.9 0.0 53 30.1 59.4 14.9 37.4
Butte 86 62.0 37.3 1.8 64 29.9 59.8 13.7 44.1 14.7 44.4
Forge 60.5 35.5 0.5 51 28.7 61.5 12.9 44.7
Glupro 67.3 42.9 2.0 52 26.8 57.1 18.3 29.8
Grandin 63.8 34.5 0.0 59 30.8 59.2 14.7 40.9 15.1 43.6
Gunner 66.5 37.3 0.0 18 28.3 60.9 15.1 41.3 16.2 44.1
Gus 67.0 37.0 0.0 29 25.9 56.5 15.1 41.5
HJ98 64.3 31.8 0.3 74 26.0 57.4 12.8 46.3
Hager 66.5 32.1 0.0 67 27.4 54.9 13.7 38.6
Ingot 60.5 37.0 1.3 64 27.8 62.0 13.4 44.2
Ivan 66.8 31.1 0.0 49 29.9 59.7 12.4 42.5
Keene 65.5 41.2 1.0 40 26.4 57.4 14.1 41.0 15.1 41.3
Kulm 62.0 37.9 1.0 49 28.4 59.4 14.5 42.4 15.3 41.4
McVey 68.5 35.8 0.8 84 27.7 56.3 11.4 43.5
Oxen 62.5 31.3 0.3 83 26.3 57.2 13.3 46.3 14.3 46.0
Parshall 63.0 38.8 0.3 31 29.4 60.3 14.4 43.8
Reeder 63.8 34.5 0.3 34 28.4 57.0 14.2 45.8 14.7 45.4
Russ 63.0 36.4 1.5 61 29.4 59.5 13.3 52.9 14.5 51.2
Ember 62.0 35.5 1.0 36 30.0 62.2 12.8 50.6
Sharpshooter 61.8 35.8 1.8 62 29.3 61.4 13.5 44.4
Trenton 64.5 40.2 1.3 18 31.2 58.8 14.6 43.2 15.0 44.5
Verde 65.3 32.3 0.0 51 28.8 59.6 12.7 44.2 14.1 43.9
Mean 64.1 35.9 0.7 52 28.7 59.1 14.0 43.5 -- --
C.V. % 1.3 3.2 81.9 27 5.8 1.3 3.0 7.1 -- --
LSD .05 1.2 1.6 0.8 20 2.4 1.1 0.6 4.3 -- -

Planting Date: April 23, 1999; Harvest Date: August 9, 1999; Previous Crop: Spring Wheat













Hard Red Spring Wheat - Disease Induced Environment Carrington
1997-99 Average




Variety
Days to Head

Plant Ht


Lodging Score


Leaf Disease


1000 Kwt


Test Wt




Protein


Grain Yield




Protein


Grain Yield
in 0-9 % gms lbs/bu % bu/ac % bu/ac
Conventional
AC Abbey 62.5 34.0 5.5 38.3 25.0 52.2 15.9 32.9
AC Barrie 65.0 39.7 1.5 38.5 27.9 57.7 16.5 36.4 16.4 38.1
AC Intrepid 61.3 37.1 2.5 27.0 29.7 56.2 16.1 45.0
Butte 86 61.3 36.1 1.8 13.0 27.4 55.3 16.9 46.4 16.3 43.8
Dandy 62.8 34.4 2.0 17.0 29.8 55.9 15.9 48.8
Gunner 66.5 37.3 1.0 22.8 24.1 56.6 17.9 38.1 17.1 39.7
Ingot 58.5 37.6 1.8 28.8 26.6 59.0 16.7 55.0 16.2 51.9
Keene 65.0 39.9 0.8 12.5 25.4 57.1 16.7 39.1 16.4 41.4
Kulm 60.8 36.2 2.3 18.0 27.0 57.8 15.8 52.5 15.9 47.0
Majestic 66.5 39.8 1.8 36.0 26.0 53.6 18.2 30.8
McVey 67.0 38.5 6.0 17.8 27.3 54.6 15.2 47.0
Mercury 63.0 28.9 2.3 29.0 26.7 52.9 16.2 45.4
Norpro 63.5 32.1 0.8 13.0 27.9 55.6 16.2 51.6
Parshall 62.8 39.6 1.8 20.8 28.8 59.3 16.5 45.6 15.8 47.6
Prodigy 66.3 41.5 1.8 18.8 24.9 56.4 18.5 38.9
Russ 62.5 36.0 2.5 20.0 26.9 53.9 16.6 50.3 15.6 52.3
Sharp 60.3 34.9 2.5 26.0 26.4 56.1 16.6 46.0 15.7 44.9
Terra McKenzie 62.5 38.4 2.3 22.8 26.8 58.6 16.0 50.6
Trenton 63.5 40.9 3.0 16.0 28.3 56.4 16.5 49.6 16.1 49.4
Semi-Dwarf
2370 63.3 34.1 1.3 22.3 23.8 54.3 16.4 44.8
2375 63.3 34.2 4.5 19.8 29.8 57.7 15.6 55.0 15.2 50.4
Argent 62.5 36.4 2.0 17.0 30.7 57.3 17.6 46.8
Aurora 68.5 30.5 2.8 16.3 26.3 52.8 16.0 42.0
Ember 61.3 34.4 1.0 27.8 25.2 55.2 16.4 39.4
Forge 58.3 36.1 2.3 24.3 26.7 56.7 16.2 47.1
Grandin 62.8 35.5 2.5 20.3 26.8 54.2 17.4 41.1 16.6 39.7
HJ98 63.3 33.4 4.8 30.8 24.4 54.8 15.8 49.3 14.8 44.5
Hager 65.0 32.2 2.3 25.0 26.7 52.6 16.8 34.2 16.2 36.4
Hamer 63.0 32.9 3.5 23.8 26.9 54.6 15.7 51.9 15.3 51.5
Ivan 66.8 32.5 0.5 31.5 24.0 54.4 14.7 38.1
Lars 65.5 31.1 3.0 23.0 24.0 48.5 15.8 39.6 15.3 40.2
Nora 61.8 28.6 3.0 47.3 24.1 51.3 18.6 38.7 17.0 34.6
Oxen 60.0 31.9 1.8 24.3 24.2 53.8 16.7 51.6 15.7 47.0
Reeder 62.5 35.3 1.8 11.5 28.1 57.2 16.3 54.1 16.1 46.8
Verde 64.5 33.8 3.3 19.3 28.8 58.2 14.8 58.8 15.0 46.6
Mean 63.4 35.5 2.3 22.1 26.4 55.5 16.6 44.7 -- --
C.V. % 1.5 4.0 53.3 50.1 9.8 3.8 4.5 14.0 -- --
LSD .05 1.3 2.0 1.7 15.4 3.6 2.9 1.0 8.7 -- -

Planting Date: April 28, 1999; Harvest Date: August 24, 1999; Previous Crop: Spring Wheat



Hard Red Spring Wheat Barnes County - Dazey
1997-99 Average


Variety
Plant Height Lodging Score 1000 Kwt

Test Weight


Protein
Grain Yield

Protein
Grain Yield
in 0-9 gms lbs/bu % bu/ac % bu/ac
2370 36.8 4.5 22.2 55.9 14.9 34.3
2375 36.8 6.0 26.1 59.8 14.5 39.3 15.1 41.5
AC Barrie 36.6 7.0 22.4 55.0 17.0 18.5
Amidon 39.4 6.5 26.3 56.9 15.7 28.6 15.8 35.2
Argent 37.4 2.5 27.2 59.0 15.9 40.8
Butte 86 37.4 2.5 29.4 59.0 14.8 46.4 15.9 39.6
Ember 36.0 4.0 25.5 59.2 14.1 32.3
Forge 37.4 2.5 26.3 60.0 13.3 48.9
Grandin 37.4 4.0 24.4 56.1 15.6 34.0 16.2 32.4
Gunner 36.0 7.0 22.4 57.1 17.2 29.3 17.3 35.0
HJ98 32.1 7.5 22.2 56.0 14.8 32.0
Hager 32.7 3.0 26.1 55.3 14.5 33.7
Hamer 32.9 5.5 28.3 58.2 13.8 48.3 14.7 42.0
Ingot 40.4 3.0 25.5 61.3 14.0 45.1
Ivan 30.9 5.5 27.3 58.2 13.2 41.4
Keene 40.4 5.5 26.0 59.7 15.7 37.1 16.0 36.7
Kulm 40.7 2.5 28.1 61.3 14.9 46.7 16.0 38.3
Lars 28.5 6.5 25.7 55.1 14.0 36.8
McVey 32.7 4.5 21.7 52.8 14.4 26.3
Oxen 34.1 4.0 22.3 56.2 14.3 43.9 15.1 40.3
Parshall 40.6 3.0 26.9 61.2 15.7 42.3
Reeder 33.5 2.0 25.7 57.7 15.2 39.1 15.9 39.8
Russ 38.0 4.5 28.3 58.0 15.3 49.3 15.7 43.9
Trenton 40.6 2.5 28.9 58.9 15.1 39.3 16.0 41.3
Verde 32.9 2.5 25.2 56.4 13.7 39.7 14.9 37.2
Mean 36.0 4.2 25.8 57.9 14.9 38.8 -- --
C.V. % 3.8 17.7 4.4 1.0 3.2 10.1 -- --
LSD .05 2.8 1.5 1.8 0.8 0.8 5.5 -- -

Planting Date: May 27, 1999; Harvest Date: August 31, 1999; Previous Crop: Spring Wheat

Hard Red Spring Wheat Wishek
1997-99 Average


Variety
Plant Height Lodging Score 1000 Kwt Test Weight

Protein
Grain Yield

Protein


Grain Yield
in 0-9 gms lbs/bu % bu/ac % bu/ac
2370 32.0 6.3 17.0 51.9 14.6 23.6
2375 35.8 5.3 21.1 54.9 13.8 27.1 14.8 33.1
AC Barrie 38.7 6.0 17.9 48.8 15.6 17.5
Amidon 41.5 1.7 24.1 57.3 15.1 40.3 15.7 33.9
Argent 34.5 1.7 23.2 55.0 16.4 27.4
Butte 86 36.1 2.7 21.7 54.1 15.0 27.3 15.8 31.8
Forge 35.8 3.7 22.5 56.3 13.7 30.5
Grandin 33.3 4.7 20.8 53.1 15.8 23.8 16.1 28.6
Gunner 37.7 0.0 17.1 56.1 16.9 31.7
HJ98 31.5 7.0 18.2 54.2 13.9 31.5
Hager 31.0 2.0 20.3 52.6 14.2 29.5
Hamer 31.6 6.7 21.4 54.7 13.9 27.7 14.8 34.8
Ingot 37.9 6.0 21.2 56.5 14.4 29.2
Ivan 31.2 1.0 24.7 58.3 13.3 39.2
Keene 40.6 1.3 24.2 59.1 15.1 40.7 15.7 32.1
Kulm 39.2 4.3 22.2 57.7 15.0 32.3 15.4 33.9
McVey 30.2 7.7 16.8 49.0 13.8 19.8
Oxen 35.4 2.3 18.4 53.2 14.3 31.2 15.0 35.0
Parshall 38.2 3.7 22.7 59.0 14.8 32.9
Reeder 32.9 3.3 19.2 54.8 13.9 28.0
Russ 36.9 1.0 23.0 54.9 15.6 35.0 15.9 36.9
Ember 35.8 3.0 21.4 56.4 13.1 30.6
Trenton 41.9 3.3 24.1 57.0 14.7 35.3 15.4 35.8
Verde 33.1 3.3 21.8 55.0 13.2 34.8 14.9 31.4
Mean 35.4 3.5 21.2 55.2 14.7 30.6 -- --
C.V. % 3.8 25.9 4.8 3.0 2.3 9.3 -- --
LSD .05 2.2 1.5 1.7 2.4 0.5 4.0 -- -

Planting Date: May 25, 1999; Harvest Date: September 10, 1999; Previous Crop: Spring Wheat

Durum Wheat - Dryland Carrington
1997 - 99 Average


Variety
Days to Head Plant Height Lodging Score 1000 Kwt Test Weight

Protein
Grain Yield

Protein
Grain Yield
in 0-9 gms lbs/bu % bu/ac % bu/ac
AC Pathfinder 61.5 35.0 3.3 33.4 56.0 14.9 46.8
Belzer 65.0 38.4 1.3 35.8 54.8 15.5 52.9 14.7 49.3
Ben 64.0 37.4 0.8 37.6 57.6 14.9 49.9 14.5 46.5
Plaza 65.5 31.8 0.8 36.1 56.9 13.3 56.4 14.0 46.2
Dressler 63.5 37.5 2.3 32.5 56.0 15.1 45.7 15.2 42.6
Kari 63.0 35.3 0.8 35.8 57.6 14.3 49.9
Kyle 66.5 41.4 3.5 36.8 57.4 15.1 52.7
Laker 64.5 33.7 2.0 33.1 56.3 14.1 48.1
Lebsock 63.3 34.4 1.3 35.3 59.3 14.9 55.2 14.3 50.2
Lloyd 64.8 28.8 0.0 35.1 54.2 14.9 44.2 14.5 37.9
Maier 65.0 35.7 1.3 35.6 57.2 16.0 53.3 15.4 47.2
Medora 62.3 37.2 2.0 34.4 57.0 14.7 48.4 14.7 45.2
Monroe 60.0 34.8 2.5 36.0 55.9 14.0 41.9 13.8 44.0
Mountrail 64.8 36.1 1.3 38.0 58.6 13.5 61.4 14.3 51.0
Munich 62.8 33.2 1.8 33.6 57.6 13.7 53.1 14.2 47.8
Plenty 65.8 40.6 2.3 35.9 56.7 15.0 53.8 15.2 46.3
Regold 64.3 37.8 1.5 36.3 57.2 13.6 50.3 14.3 42.8
Renville 63.0 37.6 1.8 34.2 57.6 14.7 48.7 14.4 46.5
Rugby 63.8 36.0 1.5 33.7 56.9 14.0 50.4 14.0 47.7
Sceptre 64.0 36.0 2.0 32.6 56.3 14.7 54.4 14.3 46.9
Vic 62.5 38.6 0.5 36.2 56.7 15.2 45.2 14.6 44.8
Voss 64.3 28.7 0.0 35.7 56.1 14.9 42.0 14.4 38.8
Ward 62.5 37.0 2.3 33.6 57.0 14.9 54.2 14.6 47.8
Mean 64.0 35.7 1.6 35.1 57.1 14.5 52.4 -- --
C.V. % 1.4 4.8 52.8 6.5 19.9 4.6 11.9 -- --
LSD .05 1.2 2.4 1.2 3.2 1.5 0.9 8.6 -- --

Planting Date: April 26, 1999; Harvest Date: August 23, 1999; Previous Crop: Field Pea





Durum Wheat Barnes County - Dazey
1997 - 99 Average


Variety
Plant Height Lodging Score 1000 KWT Test Weight

Protein
Grain Yield

Protein


Grain Yield
in 0-9 gms lbs/bu % bu/ac % bu/ac
Belzer 39.0 6.0 32.4 55.4 15.3 36.6 14.5 38.5
Ben 37.8 2.5 33.0 59.8 14.3 43.5 14.7 44.8
Plaza 30.9 2.0 26.7 55.6 14.2 29.0
Lebsock 38.4 3.5 31.0 61.5 13.6 53.8
Maier 37.6 2.5 30.7 59.2 14.2 49.0 14.4 46.3
Mountrail 38.6 5.0 29.7 59.1 14.1 47.9 14.3 45.0
Munich 36.4 3.0 28.5 59.5 13.1 55.0 14.2 48.4
Renville 38.8 5.0 29.8 57.1 14.7 38.1 14.9 39.5
Mean 37.2 3.7 30.2 58.4 14.2 44.1 -- --
C.V. % 4.0 33.1 7.4 1.9 2.7 12.4 -- --
LSD .05 3.5 NS NS 1.6 0.7 8.1 -- --

Planting Date: May 25, 1999; Harvest Date: September 10, 1999; Previous Crop: Fallow

Durum Wheat - Dryland Recrop Elite Carrington
1997 - 99 Average


Variety
Days to Head Plant Height Lodging Score Leaf Disease 1000 KWT Test Weight

Protein
Grain Yield

Protein
Grain Yield
in 0-9 % gms lbs/bu % bu/ac % bu/ac
Belzer 66.0 36.9 0.3 34.5 36.4 55.9 14.6 46.7 14.1 39.3
Ben 64.5 36.5 0.0 10.3 37.5 60.0 14.3 46.4 14.3 41.0
Plaza 65.8 30.1 0.0 28.5 33.5 56.9 13.9 45.0
Dressler 63.0 36.7 0.8 27.5 35.4 58.1 14.9 47.9
Kari 64.0 34.9 0.0 13.0 33.0 57.5 14.4 44.4
Lebsock 63.8 34.6 0.0 10.8 35.5 60.3 13.8 50.8 14.0 44.5
Lloyd 65.5 28.0 0.0 44.3 32.6 53.4 14.8 35.1
Maier 63.8 34.0 0.5 11.5 33.8 58.4 15.3 44.2 15.1 39.3
Medora 62.8 35.9 1.0 46.5 34.6 59.2 14.0 47.1 14.2 39.3
Monroe 61.0 35.9 1.3 11.0 38.3 59.6 13.3 48.9 13.8 40.9
Mountrail 64.0 35.5 0.5 16.5 35.1 58.6 14.1 55.3 13.9 45.1
Munich 63.8 32.8 0.0 14.3 32.9 58.5 13.1 48.9 13.9 41.4
Plenty 66.3 37.9 2.3 15.5 32.8 57.0 14.7 47.0 15.0 42.1
Renville 63.0 38.0 1.0 19.0 34.8 58.6 13.9 50.4 14.0 42.0
Rugby 64.3 36.4 0.0 12.0 33.0 58.3 13.1 44.9 13.7 38.7
Vic 63.8 37.8 0.0 8.8 35.0 58.0 14.6 37.0 14.0 36.3
Ward 63.3 36.2 0.8 9.8 34.1 58.6 14.3 45.1 14.1 40.9
Mean 64.0 35.2 0.5 19.6 34.6 58.0 14.2 46.2 -- --
C.V. % 1.1 2.6 108.0 35.0 3.6 1.2 6.0 8.5 -- --
LSD .05 1.0 1.3 0.7 9.8 1.8 1.0 NS 5.6 -- --

Planting Date: April 23, 1999; Harvest Date: August 11, 1999; Previous Crop: Spring Wheat



Durum Wheat Tri-County - Wishek
1997 - 1999 Average


Variety
Plant Height Lodging Score 1000 Kwt Test Weight

Protein
Grain Yield

Protein
Grain Yield
in 0-9 gms lbs/bu % bu/ac % bu/ac
Belzer 40.3 3.0 29.7 57.0 14.4 32.7
Ben 38.8 0.0 33.5 60.3 14.2 37.8 15.1 32.4
Plaza 33.1 1.0 28.7 56.4 13.0 34.0
Kari 38.1 1.3 31.8 59.6 14.1 48.7
Lebsock 37.5 0.7 32.5 60.2 13.5 36.5
Maier 36.9 1.7 31.9 59.1 14.6 37.6
Mountrail 37.3 1.3 31.4 59.2 14.0 43.0
Munich 35.2 0.7 29.8 58.1 13.7 42.2 14.3 31.9
Renville 38.5 1.3 30.4 58.7 13.2 38.3 14.0 32.5
Rugby 39.8 1.7 29.0 57.9 13.6 34.5 14.8 30.6
Mean 37.5 1.3 30.9 58.6 13.8 38.5 -- --
C.V. % 5.6 65.0 4.2 0.9 3.1 16.2 -- --
LSD .05 3.6 1.4 2.2 0.8 0.7 9.1 -- --

Planting Date: May 25, 1999; Harvest Date: September 10, 1999; Previous Crop: Fallow

Barley - Dryland Carrington


Variety
Days to Head Plant Height Lodging Score %

Plump

%

Thin



Protein
Test Weight Grain Yield 1997 - 99 Average Yield
in 0-9 >6/64 <5/64 % lbs/bu bu/ac bu/ac
Six-Row
Azure 60.3 27.4 0.8 87.5 1.6 13.0 49.6 85.2 86.9
Excel 61.0 26.2 0.3 75.0 2.9 13.0 48.7 92.2 92.9
Foster 62.0 27.5 0.0 82.7 2.4 13.2 48.1 96.3 94.2
MNBrite 61.3 28.7 0.3 86.8 2.0 14.1 50.3 94.2 91.2
Merit 68.0 28.5 0.0 82.7 3.1 13.0 47.5 90.5
Morex 59.3 30.3 1.5 73.2 3.5 14.2 47.9 80.2 80.8
Robust 61.0 28.7 0.3 85.6 2.2 14.0 50.2 89.3 87.8
Stander 61.8 25.6 0.0 82.6 2.8 13.2 48.1 87.7 91.0
Two-Row
Bowman 62.3 26.3 2.5 83.9 3.2 13.3 50.1 64.1 71.0
Conlon 60.5 28.8 1.0 90.8 2.4 13.2 47.6 98.3 83.6
Harrington 65.8 29.8 1.3 71.7 5.4 13.8 46.0 75.5 72.0
Logan 63.8 25.8 0.8 84.9 3.9 13.4 50.2 81.4 86.4
Stark 63.8 30.7 0.0 84.6 4.6 13.3 50.3 87.7 91.5
Mean 62.0 27.9 0.4 83.1 3.1 13.3 49.1 85.6 --
C.V. % 2.1 7.1 122.0 5.6 29.5 3.4 3.5 13.1 --
LSD .05 1.8 2.8 0.7 6.6 1.3 0.6 2.4 15.9 -

Planting Date: April 27, 1999; Harvest Date: August 3, 1999; Previous Crop: Field Pea





Barley - Dryland Recrop Elite Carrington
1997 - 1999 Average



Variety
Days to Head Plant Height Lodging Score %

Plump

%

Thin



Protein
Test Weight Grain Yield

Protein
Grain Yield
in 0-9 >6/64 <5/64 % lbs/bu bu/ac % bu/ac
Six-Row
Azure 62.0 28.7 0.8 85.4 2.1 14.0 48.8 82.0 12.8 80.1
Excel 61.0 27.8 1.3 76.2 3.4 14.0 47.4 74.1 12.7 74.5
Foster 61.3 27.7 1.3 87.3 1.7 13.9 48.2 83.1 12.5 79.9
MNBrite 62.5 30.7 1.8 84.3 2.0 16.0 48.7 74.6 14.2
Merit 70.0 26.6 0.0 73.9 4.2 14.3 45.5 89.4
Morex 59.0 33.0 3.3 81.6 2.3 14.8 47.1 69.8
Robust 61.3 29.7 1.3 83.7 2.0 14.5 49.3 76.7 13.3 76.1
Stander 62.0 26.1 0.3 87.7 1.8 13.4 45.7 76.8 12.3 76.5
Two-Row
Conlon 59.0 26.3 3.8 92.8 1.1 14.1 52.0 61.8 12.8 67.9
Harrington 68.5 24.1 2.0 60.4 7.7 15.5 44.1 58.5
Logan 61.5 23.4 2.0 85.2 3.2 13.9 50.3 63.2 13.2 69.5
Stark 62.3 25.6 1.0 88.3 2.0 14.0 51.2 75.0 13.0 73.8
Mean 62.4 27.3 1.4 82.1 2.8 14.3 48.3 74.3 -- --
C.V. % 1.6 6.6 45.3 3.8 34.4 3.1 4.0 12.2 -- --
LSD .05 1.5 2.6 0.9 4.5 1.4 1.0 2.7 12.9 - -

Planting Date: April 27, 1999; Harvest Date: July 30, 1999; Previous Crop: Spring Wheat

Barley - Irrigated Carrington


Variety
Days to Head Plant Height Lodging Score %

Plump

%

Thin



Protein
Test Weight Grain Yield 1997 - 99 Average Yield
in 0-9 >6/64 <5/64 % lbs/bu bu/ac bu/ac
Six-Row
Azure 60.8 34.7 0.5 80.1 3.0 14.2 47.7 89.1 91.7
Excel 59.8 30.9 0.0 74.3 3.6 13.7 47.6 93.9 93.9
Foster 61.3 31.7 0.3 80.0 2.3 14.2 46.8 79.7 91.3
MNBrite 61.5 32.5 0.3 82.8 2.4 14.4 49.0 84.9
Merit 68.3 30.8 0.5 77.9 4.2 13.7 46.4 70.0
Morex 57.8 33.9 1.5 76.3 3.2 14.5 47.0 81.7 76.7
Robust 61.0 33.3 0.5 82.8 2.3 14.2 49.3 89.7 87.5
Stander 62.3 30.1 0.0 86.0 2.1 14.0 47.7 83.6 87.0
Two-Row
Bowman 58.3 29.9 2.0 84.0 3.1 13.9 49.5 77.1 76.4
Conlon 56.5 32.2 2.5 91.4 1.8 13.8 51.0 73.0 75.9
Harrington 65.5 33.3 1.8 71.7 5.4 13.8 46.4 69.7 67.5
Logan 61.3 29.8 1.3 83.6 4.2 13.9 49.1 78.1 84.4
Stark 62.5 31.7 1.0 86.5 3.7 13.6 51.0 86.8 88.3
Mean 60.6 31.8 0.6 81.8 3.1 13.9 48.5 82.8 --
C.V. % 2.2 6.0 91.7 5.1 27.5 2.9 1.8 9.5 --
LSD .05 1.9 2.7 0.8 5.9 1.2 0.6 1.2 11.1 -

Planting Date: April 28, 1999; Harvest Date: August 5, 1999; Previous Crop: Spring Wheat





Barley Tri-County - Wishek
1997 - 1999 Average


Variety
Plant Height Lodging Score %

Plump

%

Thin



Protein
Test Weight Grain Yield

Protein
Grain Yield
in 0-9 >6/64 <5/64 % lbs/bu bu/ac % bu/ac
Six-Row
Excel 25.2 6.3 77.7 1.7 13.5 43.8 41.2 12.8 58.6
Foster 25.0 6.5 65.6 1.9 13.5 43.4 39.8 12.6 57.5
Harrington 25.1 4.0 73.0 1.8 12.9 44.2 43.4
MNBrite 25.3 3.3 67.3 2.6 12.5 43.9 41.5
Merit 25.9 3.3 80.4 1.3 13.3 44.2 37.8
Robust 27.3 7.0 78.6 1.2 12.7 44.7 38.7 12.9 53.0
Stander 25.4 2.5 71.8 1.3 13.0 43.5 40.1 12.6 56.0
Two-Row
Conlon 26.0 3.3 71.5 2.1 12.7 43.4 43.4 13.0 51.2
Logan 28.4 3.5 70.4 1.5 13.6 43.7 40.0 13.2 50.8
Stark 26.7 5.0 74.8 1.8 13.5 43.8 36.4 13.1 53.4
Mean 26.0 4.2 73.8 1.7 13.1 43.9 40.0 -- --
C.V. % 15.3 43.3 15.0 57.0 4.8 4.2 13.5 -- --
LSD .05 NS 2.6 NS NS NS NS NS -- --

Planting Date: May 25, 1999; Harvest Date: August 20, 1999; Previous Crop: Fallow

Oats- Dryland Carrington



Variety
Days to Head Plant Height Lodging Score 1000 Kwt Test Weight Grain Yield 1997 - 99

Average Yield

in 0-9 gms lbs/bu bu/ac bu/ac
AC Assinaboia 70.0 42.8 0.0 34.1 36.8 131.9 117.5
AC Medallion 69.0 42.5 1.5 28.6 35.1 128.7 117.2
AC Preakness 70.3 41.3 1.3 26.6 33.6 115.6
Bay 68.5 36.6 0.0 27.7 34.8 124.3 109.3
Belle 67.0 39.5 0.0 26.3 37.0 120.7
Brawn 65.5 35.9 0.0 30.1 35.9 125.7 119.7
CDC Boyer 68.0 42.5 1.5 29.1 34.0 138.4 122.7
CDC Pacer 67.8 40.5 2.5 27.8 30.5 120.3
Chaps 62.8 35.8 0.0 25.3 36.0 133.3
DuPont 69.0 39.7 2.0 27.8 33.9 114.9
Ebeltoft 69.3 38.0 0.3 25.4 35.2 130.4 117.8
Gem 64.3 37.7 0.0 29.0 37.4 117.2
Hytest 63.5 39.6 2.8 27.2 40.8 96.0 94.5
Jerry 64.8 40.7 2.8 26.2 38.2 125.3 101.6
Jud 69.0 43.6 1.8 26.1 35.9 129.1 114.9
Milton 65.0 37.6 2.5 25.5 36.7 129.6 115.3
Monida 68.5 39.8 5.0 24.2 30.9 117.8 113.2
Newdak 63.5 37.8 3.5 21.8 34.4 115.8
Otana 67.5 43.0 5.3 20.8 31.4 105.0 96.4
Paul 69.3 43.5 1.3 21.8 39.0 101.6 88.7
Porter 67.3 38.9 2.5 23.4 32.8 112.2 102.7
Prairie 64.0 34.9 2.0 24.3 32.8 119.8 113.7
Rodeo 64.0 37.6 1.3 23.0 35.1 134.2
Troy 65.3 42.1 2.0 23.8 37.4 144.3 126.0
Whitestone 69.3 38.5 5.5 21.1 29.5 114.3 109.9
Youngs 67.0 42.4 0.3 31.7 40.1 132.5 120.2
Mean 67.1 40.2 1.5 25.9 35.7 124.7 --
C.V. % 1.1 3.7 81.8 6.7 5.1 8.4 --
LSD .05 1.0 2.1 1.7 2.8 2.5 14.6 --

Planting Date: April 26, 1999; Harvest Date: August 10, 1999; Previous Crop: Field Pea

Oats- Dryland Recrop Elite Carrington


Variety
Days to Head Plant Height Lodging Score 1000 Kwt Test Weight Grain Yield 1997 - 99 Average Yield
in 0-9 gms lbs/bu bu/ac bu/ac
AC Assinaboia 68.5 38.4 0.0 34.0 37.7 125.7 106.4
AC Medallion 66.3 37.4 1.0 31.1 37.4 126.3
AC Preakness 67.5 36.9 2.5 30.1 37.0 118.9
Bay 68.8 31.0 0.8 28.7 36.1 126.8 104.3
Belle 67.3 35.6 0.8 28.4 38.5 117.7
Brawn 65.0 31.5 0.8 32.7 36.8 124.8 108.1
CDC Boyer 66.5 38.6 1.3 35.2 37.5 120.4
CDC Pacer 66.0 35.5 2.8 30.2 36.4 112.5
Chaps 62.0 34.0 0.3 27.1 37.1 120.5
Dumont 67.0 36.5 1.5 31.4 38.1 119.0 98.6
Ebeltoft 68.8 36.3 0.5 30.9 38.5 144.4 114.6
Gem 61.8 33.8 0.3 30.7 39.1 108.8
Hytest 62.3 35.9 2.3 32.4 42.1 91.9
Jerry 63.3 36.2 1.5 28.0 40.1 120.6 91.4
Jud 67.5 38.7 2.8 28.1 37.5 129.9 104.0
Milton 63.3 33.0 0.8 27.3 38.9 104.2 88.7
Monida 67.5 36.3 3.3 24.2 34.2 117.8 99.1
Otana 67.3 38.3 5.3 24.8 38.0 95.9 91.6
Paul 68.8 37.2 0.8 23.8 41.2 96.4 77.2
Porter 64.8 34.6 2.5 30.6 38.8 107.9 93.5
Prairie 62.5 33.3 3.0 26.4 36.6 127.1 102.9
Rodeo 62.8 34.5 0.8 27.7 36.5 125.5
Troy 63.8 37.8 2.0 26.3 39.4 115.6 103.0
Whitestone 68.3 33.7 0.5 26.3 36.7 117.9 96.1
Youngs 65.8 39.2 1.0 32.2 38.1 140.6 119.2
Mean 65.8 35.9 1.3 29.1 38.3 119.9 --
C.V. % 1.6 3.9 77.8 7.3 2.0 7.1 --
LSD .05 1.5 2.0 1.4 3.5 1.1 12.0 --

Planting Date: April 23, 1999; Harvest Date: August 9, 1999; Previous Crop: Spring Wheat





Oats Tri-County - Wishek
Variety Plant Height Lodging Score Test Weight Grain Yield 1997 - 99 Average Yield
in 0-9 lbs/bu bu/ac bu/ac
AC Assinaboia 34 2.0 35.8 65
Brawn 34 1.3 33.7 63 74
Ebeltoft 33 0.5 35.5 54
Jerry 32 1.3 33.7 54 79
Jud 34 1.5 34.6 61 75
Newdak 35 1.5 33.7 64 84
Paul 33 1.0 33.3 57 62
Prairie 30 0.3 32.4 62 79
Troy 33 1.8 32.3 65 79
Whitestone 33 4.0 33.9 61 79
Youngs 34 1.3 34.6 65
Mean 33 1.6 34.0 62 --
C.V. % 9 94.9 5.9 10 --
LSD .05 NS NS NS NS --

Planting Date: May 25, 1999; Harvest Date: August 20, 1999; Previous Crop: Fallow

Canola - Dryland Conventional, Liberty Link and IMI Cultivars (Page 1 of 2) Carrington





Variety




Type
Days

to Flower



Bloom Duration
Days

to

Maturity



Lodging Score


Plant Ht


Test Wt


Grain Yield
0-9 in lbs/bu lbs/ac
Interstate Hyola 401 50.0 23.0 97.0 2.7 31.0 51.9 1854
Interstate Crusher 56.3 28.3 99.3 1.0 42.8 52.3 1583
Limagrain Ebony 55.8 25.8 99.5 0.8 38.0 51.5 1598
AC Parkland 47.8 28.5 89.8 3.5 29.0 52.5 875
AC Boreal 46.0 29.0 90.8 3.3 25.0 52.4 853
Reward 47.3 29.5 93.0 3.3 26.0 52.3 849
Interstate Hyola 330 47.3 23.0 93.8 3.3 28.0 52.3 1690
Interstate Hyola 420 50.5 24.8 97.5 3.0 34.5 51.4 1955
Interstate Z009 54.8 25.5 97.5 2.8 35.5 52.5 1205
IMC-Cargill IMC 201 49.8 25.0 93.5 3.5 27.5 52.1 1436
IMC-Cargill IMC 202 52.0 27.3 98.5 3.5 32.8 51.6 1579
IMC-Cargill 93KK51004 49.8 22.8 95.3 4.0 30.3 52.0 1518
IMC-Cargill 93NE1439 50.5 26.0 92.3 5.3 32.0 53.5 1362
IMC-Cargill IMC 140 51.3 25.8 97.5 3.8 33.0 51.5 1005
Proseed Topscore 56.3 27.0 98.5 1.0 43.8 52.2 1681
Proseed Blue Ribbon 59.0 26.0 102.5 0.5 54.0 51.8 2166
Proseed DP7-97 53.3 27.5 101.3 1.0 35.8 51.0 1809
Agriprogress PF8414/96 52.3 24.3 98.0 1.5 36.5 50.9 2225
Agriprogress DSI-9220 54.5 27.8 102.3 2.5 44.8 52.2 2434
Pioneer 46A65 50.8 27.8 98.5 3.3 34.5 51.7 1756
Pioneer 46A76 56.5 26.3 101.8 1.0 42.0 51.4 2187
Pioneer 45A03 50.5 27.0 97.3 2.3 30.0 52.6 1622
Croplan Genetics CL2070 54.8 28.3 100.5 1.5 39.8 50.6 1800
Croplan Genetics CL2078 55.0 27.5 99.8 1.3 42.5 51.1 1870
Croplan Genetics Hudson 50.3 26.3 93.0 2.0 29.8 52.4 1505
Croplan Genetics Oscar 53.8 28.8 100.0 1.8 37.5 53.9 1718
InVigor (AgrEvo) 2373 53.8 24.0 97.0 2.3 37.8 52.2 2134
InVigor (AgrEvo) 2363 53.0 24.5 96.8 1.8 35.8 52.5 1292
AgrEvo HCN41 56.0 27.0 101.0 1.5 42.0 52.2 1907
AgrEvo Phoenix 53.2 26.2 96.6 1.8 34.6 51.7 1995
AgrEvo PHS98-639 53.3 22.0 95.5 1.8 39.8 52.8 1966
AgrEvo PHS98-685 52.5 23.3 94.8 1.5 35.5 52.4 1950
AgrEvo PHS98-730 51.0 27.0 95.5 2.8 35.0 52.8 1847
AgrEvo PHS98-601 54.8 21.5 98.5 1.0 37.5 51.0 1957
AgrEvo PHS98-596 54.3 22.3 96.8 1.8 36.8 50.3 1893
Limagrain LG3222 54.0 28.0 100.5 3.0 35.3 51.9 1536
Limagrain LG3333 50.3 30.0 97.8 3.3 34.0 51.7 1674
Limagrain LG3369 54.8 28.5 100.5 1.8 39.5 51.9 1786
Limagrain LG3311 53.3 25.8 97.0 1.8 33.0 51.7 1509
Agri-Tel OAC Summit 54.8 23.8 96.0 3.0 35.8 53.0 1947
Kaystar KC-701 54.3 30.5 101.0 1.8 43.3 50.7 1854
Kaystar KC-007 55.8 22.8 95.5 1.3 38.5 51.9 1606
Dow AgroSciences 1709 54.5 25.5 97.3 1.0 36.0 51.3 2052
Dow AgroSciences DMS-100 56.0 28.3 103.3 2.3 41.3 51.4 1529
Dow AgroSciences SV095-08 55.8 29.5 103.3 0.8 44.3 51.6 1604
Dow AgroSciences M94S007 57.3 22.8 104.3 1.5 39.3 51.7 2116
Dow AgroSciences M94S010 50.5 25.8 97.8 2.0 30.5 51.5 1527
Mean 53.2 26.4 97.8 2.2 37.0 51.9 1721
C.V. % 2.4 6.5 2.1 41.7 9.9 0.9 15
LSD .05 1.7 2.4 2.8 1.2 5.1 0.7 367
Canola - Dryland Conventional, Liberty Link and IMI Cultivars (Page 2 of 2) Carrington




Variety




Type
Days

to Flower



Bloom Duration
Days

to

PM





Lodge


Plant Ht


Test Wt


Grain Yield
0.0 in lbs/bu lbs/ac
Integra Eagle 51.8 30.8 97.5 2.3 40.0 52.4 1535
Integra Battleford 54.0 29.0 97.8 2.3 41.5 52.7 2001
Integra Advantage 55.5 30.3 101.0 1.5 46.3 51.9 1734
Integra CrackerJack 54.5 28.5 100.0 1.3 41.5 51.5 1955
Agricore A97-26N 48.3 28.5 96.5 4.8 33.0 52.8 1379
Agricore A98-1N 48.8 29.0 93.8 3.3 33.5 52.4 1186
Agricore Q2 53.0 24.5 96.5 2.3 35.5 53.2 2096
Agricore 91-15026NA 55.0 23.0 95.3 1.0 37.0 52.9 1949
Cargill Roseau 55.3 25.3 101.5 1.5 37.8 49.7 2174
Cargill Cavalier 52.3 23.0 92.5 2.5 30.8 53.1 1293
Svalof Weibull Goldpro 701 52.8 28.3 98.0 2.8 38.8 50.5 1734
Promark Promark 220 55.8 28.8 100.3 1.3 42.3 51.5 1878
Seeds 2000 Golden Boy 54.5 26.0 99.3 1.0 39.3 51.3 2050
Canterra 1492 52.0 27.8 97.0 0.8 38.8 51.2 2082
Canterra 1134 54.5 27.3 97.5 3.0 36.8 52.0 1376
Canterra 1174 55.0 23.5 97.5 1.3 37.8 50.9 1950
Brett-Young 96-2367LL 56.8 28.5 103.0 2.0 47.0 51.8 1727
Brett-Young 96-2393LL 56.0 26.8 99.8 1.8 47.0 52.0 2076
Parsons PSL98-112 53.8 25.8 98.5 2.8 38.8 52.5 2181
Mean 53.2 26.4 97.8 2.2 37.0 51.9 1721
C.V. % 2.4 6.5 2.1 41.7 9.9 0.9 15
LSD .05 1.7 2.4 2.8 1.2 5.1 0.7 367

Planting Date: April 30, 1999; Harvest Date: Various, based on maturity; Previous Crop: Durum





Canola Tri-County - Wishek
Variety Type Lodging Score Plant Height Test Weight Grain Yield
0-9 in lbs/bu lbs/ac
Interstate Hyola 401 0.0 46.9 49.8 1166
Interstate Crusher 0.0 44.2 49.0 1254
Limagrain Ebony 0.0 44.4 48.0 1583
Mean 0.0 45.2 48.9 1335
C.V. % -- 10.0 1.5 22
LSD .05 NS NS 1.3 NS



Canola - Dryland Roundup Ready Cultivars Carrington





Variety




Type
Days

to Bloom



Bloom Duration
Days

to

PM



Lodging Score


Plant Ht


Test Wt


Grain Yield
0-9 in lbs/bu lbs/ac
LG3295 50.8 21.3 90.3 2.5 25.1 50.5 1650
Pioneer 45A51 RR 54.3 24.5 95.8 1.8 30.8 50.6 1682
Interstate Quest 48.8 26.5 92.8 2.5 26.2 50.9 1122
Interstate Arrow 53.3 29.0 93.5 2.0 32.6 52.0 1616
Interstate Hyola 357 RR 47.5 25.0 95.5 2.0 27.4 49.0 1624
Interstate Hyola 223 RR 47.5 26.5 94.8 2.5 27.6 49.8 1410
Interstate SW RideR 52.3 28.3 94.8 1.0 36.0 50.8 1743
IMC-Cargill IMC 203 RR 53.8 23.0 94.5 2.0 32.3 51.7 1600
IMC-Cargill QT2.151 54.0 26.0 96.0 1.5 31.1 52.0 1675
IMC-Cargill QT2.186 52.5 23.8 96.3 2.3 31.3 52.4 1689
IMC-Cargill QT2.177 54.5 24.0 96.0 1.5 32.1 52.1 1775
IMC-Cargill RTC 12.2118 53.3 23.0 95.3 2.8 31.3 50.1 1787
Croplan Genetics Minot RR 53.3 25.3 94.0 1.8 31.3 50.4 1864
Limagrain LG3235 49.3 30.3 92.8 1.8 27.3 50.8 1231
Limagrain LG3275 49.8 26.8 95.0 1.3 28.1 50.8 1573
Limagrain PR5292 53.5 26.8 96.8 2.3 32.7 50.5 1388
Limagrain PR5296 53.0 24.5 98.0 3.3 30.7 50.4 1298
Integra RaideRR 55.8 27.3 98.8 0.8 39.9 50.3 1688
Pioneer 46A52 54.5 26.8 99.5 1.3 36.1 49.1 1768
Agricore A98-9NR 54.5 25.0 95.5 1.0 35.0 51.8 1518
Svalof Weibull SW B2675 RR 51.8 25.5 94.5 2.0 31.7 50.5 1862
Seeds 2000 Golden Ready RR 51.5 26.5 97.5 3.0 29.7 50.1 1315
Danisco A5152.098 54.0 24.8 96.3 0.8 33.7 51.1 1728
Danisco A5153.104 53.3 22.3 97.5 2.0 31.7 50.8 1935
Danisco A4992.125 54.3 26.5 94.8 1.8 34.6 50.2 1642
Danisco 5152.098 54.3 27.0 99.3 0.5 34.8 50.5 1570
Danisco 5153.104 53.8 27.5 98.0 1.0 35.4 48.6 1712
Danisco 4992.125 54.0 26.5 96.3 0.8 36.8 50.2 1810
Croplan Genetics CL2061 RR 52.8 25.3 95.3 1.3 35.2 46.6 2028
Brett-Young 449RR 51.3 26.0 92.8 2.0 31.1 52.2 1309
Brett-Young 561RR 54.0 27.0 94.3 1.3 33.1 51.1 1417
Cargill LG3345 51.5 25.8 95.0 2.0 32.5 50.8 1620
Mean 52.6 25.7 95.5 1.7 32.0 50.6 1611
C.V. % 1.7 7.0 2.0 42.1 8.3 3.2 15
LSD .05 1.2 2.5 2.7 1.0 3.8 2.2 342

Planting Date: April 30, 1999; Harvest Date: Various, based on maturity; Previous Crop: Durum



Borage Carrington
Variety Days to Flower Plant Ht Lodge Test Wt Yield
in 0-9 lbs/bu lbs/ac
Gladiator 48.3 38.9 6.8 37.7 267
Tjent 54.5 38.0 3.0 37.4 308
Mean 51.4 38.4 4.9 37.6 288
C.V. % 0.7 6.3 25.0 1.2 6
LSD .05 0.8 NS 2.7 NS 38

Planting Date: May 28, 1999; Harvest Date: September 20, 1999; Previous Crop: Durum





































Crambe Carrington



Variety

Days

to Flower

Bloom Duration

Days

to Maturity

Plant Ht

Test Wt

Grain Yield

1997-99 Average Yield
in lbs/bu lb/ac lb/ac
BelAnn 62.5

23.5

99.8

42.6

23.6

1279

1739

Carman

61.0

21.8

96.3

41.4

21.8

1094

Charlotte

59.8

23.5

95.3

39.2

24.1

1093

Meyer

60.0

23.3

96.5

38.7

23.0

940

1709

Mean

60.8

23.0

96.9

40.5

23.1

1102

--

C.V. %

1.0

3.8

0.9

3.9

1.7

9

--

LSD .05

0.9

NS

1.4

2.5

0.6

158

--

Planting Date: May 19, 1999; Harvest Date: August 16, 1999; Previous Crop: Durum





Mustard Carrington




Variety
Days

to Flower



Flower Duration
Days

to

Maturity



Plant Ht




Lodge




Test Wt




Grain Yield


1997-99 Average Yield
in 0-9 lbs/bu lb/ac lb/ac
Yellow Type
AC Base 36.5 26.3 79.3 37.4 2.5 55.3 1222
AC Pennant 36.0 25.8 77.3 33.9 2.3 56.4 1120 1452
Tilney 36.0 25.3 76.5 36.8 3.0 56.0 1068 1553
Viscount 37.8 27.3 80.3 42.7 1.3 55.5 1282 1568
Oriental Type
AC Vulcan 37.5 23.8 78.5 37.8 1.8 54.4 1311 1670
Forage 37.3 26.3 77.8 40.0 2.5 54.6 1309 1570
Mean 36.8 25.8 78.3 38.1 2.2 55.4 1218 --
C.V. % 1.2 6.5 2.6 6.8 50.7 1.1 16 --
LSD .05 0.7 NS NS 3.9 NS 0.9 NS --

Planting Date: May 19, 1999; Harvest Date: August 19, 1999; Previous Crop: Durum





Camelina Carrington
Grain Yield



Variety
Days

to Flower

Bloom Duration Days to

Maturity



Plant Ht


Test Wt


1997


1999
in lbs/bu ----- lbs/ac -----
AgGrow 38.8 18.3 70.8 27.0 49.2 712 676
CO28 35.8 16.8 69.0 25.9 49.9 564 661
CO37 36.8 18.3 72.0 28.9 49.8 826 829
CO46 36.0 14.3 68.8 28.0 49.8 845 906
CO53 39.3 17.5 71.3 29.1 51.1 725 699
CO54 38.5 14.5 71.8 29.9 50.7 854 1007
CO54-97 38.0 17.0 72.0 29.3 50.5 816
CO82 38.0 17.8 72.5 30.1 50.5 713 768
Robinson 38.5 16.5 68.0 26.5 51.6 798 739
Mean 37.7 16.8 70.7 28.3 50.4 755 800
C.V. % 2.4 6.7 2.4 6.7 0.7 17 35
LSD .05 1.3 1.6 2.5 2.8 0.5 NS NS

Planting Date: May 28, 1999; Harvest Date: August 16, 1999; Previous Crop: Durum













Safflower Carrington
Yield Average Yield


Variety
Days

to Flower



Plant Ht


Test Wt


1997


1998


1999
2

year

3

year

in lbs/bu ----------------------------- lbs/ac ---------------------------
Centennial 77.5 34.3 22.7 1807 1196 775 985.5 1259.3
Finch 75.0 31.4 31.7 1743 1054 1538 1296.0 1445.0
Montola 2000 73.0 27.4 25.0 1555 1260 959 1109.5 1258.0
Montola 2001 75.8 30.8 23.7 1584 849 1063 956.0 1165.3
Montola 2003 76.0 30.7 25.7 1517
Morlin 76.0 32.5 27.5 1576 1084 1173 1128.5 1277.7
S-317 77.8 32.8 23.3 1362 1166 879 1022.5 1135.7
S-518 76.3 31.0 19.6 1271 1489 515 1002.0 1091.7
S-541 76.5 34.4 23.1 1587 1236 1060 875.5 1112.7
Mean 75.4 31.2 25.9 1561 1183 1180 -- --
C.V. % 1.4 4.8 4.5 7 12 14 -- --
LSD .05 1.5 2.5 1.7 154 198 239 -- --

Planting Date: May 19, 1999; Harvest Date: October 4, 1999; Previous Crop: Durum





















Buckwheat Carrington


Variety
Days

to Flower



Plant Height


Lodging
Test Weight Grain Yield 1997-99 Average Yield
in 0-9 lbs/bu lb/ac lb/ac
AC Manisoba 33.8 56.4 4.5 42.7 2548 1519
AC Springfield 34.3 53.6 4.0 41.3 2292 1442
Koban 34.5 53.5 4.3 43.7 2450 1554
Koto 33.0 49.8 3.0 45.3 2314
Mancan 34.3 52.5 5.3 43.6 2423 1585
Manor 36.8 54.4 5.8 42.1 1940 1296
Mean 34.4 53.4 4.5 43.1 2328 --
C.V. % 2.1 5.8 22.0 1.5 7 --
LSD .05 1.1 NS 1.5 1.0 252 --

Planting Date: May 28, 1999; Harvest Date: September 9, 1999; 0=No lodging, 9=Completely flat

Flax Carrington



Variety
Days to Flower Flower Duration Days to PM Plant Height Lodging Score Test Weight Grain Yield 1997 - 99 Average Yield
in 0-9 lbs/bu bu/ac bu/ac
AC Emerson 50.3 17.0 89.8 26.5 0.5 53.9 30.8 29.0
AC Watson 48.0 14.3 85.0 27.7 1.3 52.0 29.5 28.3
CDC Normandy 48.0 16.3 84.5 26.4 0.8 52.9 28.9 27.6
CDC Triffid 48.0 17.8 85.0 24.4 1.5 53.3 29.6
CDC Valour 45.3 15.5 82.0 25.4 3.5 51.6 25.2 25.2
Cathay 50.8 17.3 90.5 31.1 0.3 53.4 30.4 29.4
Flanders 51.5 16.8 91.0 26.9 0.5 53.1 27.8 29.4
Flor 48.3 18.5 85.5 27.0 0.5 53.3 32.2 29.8
Linora 49.3 20.0 89.0 28.4 1.0 53.3 31.4 28.9
Linott 46.5 18.3 83.0 24.9 2.0 54.0 26.4 24.1
Linton 49.3 16.3 89.3 26.4 1.5 53.6 27.9 29.6
McDuff 52.8 14.5 88.3 28.6 0.5 53.3 27.2 28.0
McGregor 53.8 15.3 91.3 30.2 0.3 54.1 32.4 30.0
Neche 49.0 19.0 88.8 28.4 0.5 53.0 28.6 28.4
NorMan 51.8 16.8 89.8 27.2 0.0 53.5 23.3 27.2
Norlin 48.5 19.8 86.3 28.3 1.0 53.3 26.7 27.5
Omega 50.0 16.5 89.3 27.6 0.0 53.6 30.1 27.1
Pembina 50.3 19.0 91.8 30.5 0.8 53.0 34.4 31.3
Prompt 46.5 21.0 86.8 27.5 1.3 53.1 30.8 28.5
Rahab 93 50.8 18.0 90.0 28.1 0.3 53.3 22.0
Webster 50.5 19.5 92.0 28.5 0.3 54.5 33.9
Mean 49.5 17.4 88.1 27.5 0.8 53.2 29.1 --
C.V. % 1.0 8.4 2.0 4.4 94.7 1.7 14.3 --
LSD .05 0.7 2.1 2.5 1.7 1.1 NS 5.9 --

Planting Date: May 17, 1999; Harvest Date: September 8, 1999; Previous Crop: Durum





Winter Rye Carrington



Variety
Jday of Head Plant Height Lodging Score 1000 Kwt Test Weight

Grain Yield
1997 - 99 Average Yield
in 0-9 gms lbs/bu bu/ac bu/ac
AC Rifle 158.0 29.3 1.8 18.6 49.7 29.0 36.1
Dacold 161.0 34.8 1.5 21.3 51.0 51.6 50.4
Musketeer 154.8 41.8 2.0 24.4 54.6 55.3 48.4
Prima 156.8 39.4 1.8 24.9 53.0 50.8 52.4
Mean 158.9 36.1 1.8 21.8 51.4 45.5 --
C.V. % 0.2 7.2 34.0 4.5 0.8 12.6 --
LSD .05 0.6 4.0 NS 1.8 0.6 8.8 --

Planting Date: September 22, 1998; Harvest Date: August 10, 1999; Previous Crop: Barley





Spring Triticale Carrington


Variety
Days to Head Plant Height Lodging Score 1000 Kwt

Test Weight


Grain Yield
1997 - 99 Average Yield
in 0-9 gms lbs/bu bu/ac bu/ac
Companion 60.8 49.7 2.8 45.4 54.4 81.5
Marvel 62.8 45.4 3.8 34.3 47.5 68.0 48.2
Norico 65.0 46.6 1.5 36.1 49.3 64.4 43.5
Trical 2700 66.0 49.3 1.3 39.8 49.0 81.8 57.3
Wapiti 61.0 51.4 3.0 45.6 53.7 83.2 60.1
310 60.3 39.8 0.3 37.8 52.6 77.4 56.5
TCL 303 61.5 38.5 0.5 36.0 53.7 78.1 55.2
TCL 310-2 62.5 37.9 0.0 33.2 53.1 69.2
PGT 215 65.8 41.9 1.0 33.9 55.7 77.0
PFT 218 63.3 42.4 0.5 34.9 54.5 73.0
Lazor 60.5 47.5 3.0 43.3 53.0 81.4
252 60.0 48.2 2.0 46.7 51.4 68.3
Mean 62.4 44.9 1.6 38.9 52.3 75.3 --
C.V. % 1.0 4.3 53.5 2.9 1.0 10.3 --
LSD .05 0.9 2.8 1.2 2.0 0.8 11.1 --

Planting Date: April 26, 1999; Harvest Date: August 20, 1999; Previous Crop: Field Pea





Proso Millet Carrington



Variety
Days

to Heading

Plant

Height



Lodging
1000 Kwt Test Weight Grain Yield 1997 - 99 Average Yield
in 0-9 gms lbs/bu lbs/ac lbs/ac
Cerise 51.3 48.7 8.0 6.1 55.8 2526 1793
Dawn 52.0 43.2 5.3 7.4 53.8 2843
Earlybird 53.3 47.4 7.3 7.3 51.4 2704 1953
Huntsman 54.3 49.0 7.0 7.5 52.1 2805 1962
Minsum 49.5 49.7 9.0 7.7 52.9 2992
Rise 52.8 41.3 6.3 6.8 52.2 2608 2219
Snowbird 50.0 47.6 9.0 7.3 52.8 2964
Sunrise 52.8 48.8 7.0 7.6 52.2 3272 2075
Sunup 52.3 46.1 4.3 7.2 53.1 3017 2142
Turghai 50.5 49.2 7.7 6.2 54.7 2595 1810
Mean 51.9 47.1 7.1 7.1 53.1 2833 --
C.V. % 2.0 6.6 15.5 3.0 1.2 12 --
LSD .05 1.5 NS 1.9 0.4 0.9 NS -

Planting Date: June 3, 1999; Harvest Date: September 9, 1999; Previous Crop: Field Pea











Field Pea (1 of 2) Carrington




Variety




Type
Days

to Bloom

Days

to

Maturity



Vine Length


Lodge at PM


Seeds per lb


1000 Kwt


Test Wt


Grain Yield
1997-99 Average Yield
in 0-9 gms lbs/bu bu/ac bu/ac
4-9310 G 57.5 101.0 35.0 5.5 1673 274.0 65.0 53.3
4L02 G 52.5 92.3 38.0 6.3 2069 220.0 63.9 62.5
4L07 G 51.5 91.8 36.0 6.3 2012 231.0 62.5 63.6
4L16 G 49.5 91.3 32.0 4.5 1511 301.0 63.8 62.9
Aeolus G 49.3 90.8 23.0 4.5 1808 251.0 63.6 38.1
Andorra G 51.5 93.5 31.0 1.0 1814 251.0 65.4 51.9
Atomic G 51.0 93.8 35.0 3.5 1333 342.0 65.1 64.4 64.3
Brutus G 52.0 95.3 35.0 2.3 1693 274.0 64.5 58.8
Explorer G 52.5 91.0 37.0 5.8 1619 281.0 63.7 60.5 55.0
Forio G 51.8 92.0 33.0 4.0 1821 250.0 64.7 52.4
Jarmo G 54.8 93.3 28.0 5.8 2230 204.0 64.5 37.2
MP1407 G 55.0 97.5 31.0 7.5 1537 296.0 64.6 58.7
Majoret G 53.3 92.8 33.0 2.0 1581 288.0 65.8 72.7 64.7
NSA97-0375 G 52.8 94.5 27.0 5.3 1746 266.0 66.0 56.5
Nitouche G 50.5 92.5 33.0 2.3 1512 305.0 64.6 67.5
Pro98106 G 47.0 89.5 28.0 5.3 2019 226.0 63.6 48.4
SW93605 G 53.5 95.5 35.0 5.3 1959 233.0 64.9 68.4
Scuba G 51.5 90.0 32.0 2.0 1522 299.0 64.1 66.1
Toledo G 50.3 90.0 31.0 2.0 1398 326.0 64.2 63.2
Tryptovar G 50.8 93.0 32.0 1.8 1986 230.0 64.9 47.7
4-0359.016 Y 52.5 92.5 38.0 3.5 1713 266.0 65.4 70.1
4-0359.050 Y 52.0 91.8 40.0 3.5 1572 290.0 65.5 69.1
98-Y2T10 Y 52.0 91.3 38.0 5.0 1568 290.0 65.0 77.2
98-Y2T8 Y 47.3 87.5 42.0 5.5 1568 290.0 63.2 62.7
Adagio Y 51.3 92.8 33.0 6.5 1611 284.0 64.5 57.3 61.3
Alfetta Y 50.5 91.8 29.0 5.0 1429 318.0 64.6 66.6 61.6
Athos Y 46.8 91.0 30.0 5.8 1430 318.0 64.9 63.4
Badminton Y 50.3 90.3 32.0 5.5 1607 284.0 64.9 72.9
Carneval Y 52.8 92.3 34.0 1.5 1873 245.0 65.0 77.1 65.4
Crusader Y 51.8 92.3 32.0 4.0 1856 246.0 64.1 64.0
Delta Y 51.3 90.5 36.0 5.5 1607 283.0 64.5 63.4 59.7
FDP9804 Y 50.0 89.0 37.0 7.3 1483 306.0 63.5 57.0
FDP9904 Y 49.8 91.3 41.0 6.8 1763 258.0 64.0 60.5
FDP9906 Y 51.0 92.5 36.0 6.5 1427 319.0 65.1 58.4
FDP9907 Y 49.5 89.5 34.0 5.5 1644 278.0 63.8 66.4
Grande Y 54.3 93.8 44.0 6.0 1859 245.0 64.8 63.5 54.5
Highlight Y 51.5 90.8 35.0 4.8 2189 208.0 65.0 71.0 69.3
Integra Y 50.5 90.3 38.0 2.3 1385 328.0 64.3 67.6 59.0
Mean 51.9 92.4 36.0 4.6 1759 270.0 64.5 60.5 --
C.V. % 1.4 1.9 16.0 32.3 11 7.7 1.0 10.8 --
LSD .05 1.0 2.5 8.0 2.0 261 29.0 0.9 9.1 --
Field Pea (2 of 2) Carrington




Variety




Type
Days

to Bloom

Days

to

Maturity



Vine Length


Lodge at PM


Seeds per lb


1000 Kwt


Test Wt


Grain Yield
1997-99 Average Yield
in 0-9 gms lbs/bu bu/ac bu/ac
Jasmine Y 51.0 90.3 38.0 3.5 1631 279.0 64.2 69.9
Marco Y 53.0 91.0 35.0 5.5 1755 259.0 64.3 60.3 59.2
NSA96-0111 Y 51.0 89.8 37.0 3.5 1627 281.0 64.0 66.2
NSA97-0337 Y 51.0 88.5 36.0 5.0 1577 289.0 65.6 73.1
NSA97-0468 Y 53.0 91.8 34.0 5.8 1766 259.0 64.9 70.9
NSA97-0513 Y 52.8 93.5 33.0 6.0 1658 275.0 64.8 64.1
Pinochio Y 51.0 89.5 35.0 3.0 1626 282.0 64.8 73.3
Pro98317 Y 46.0 86.3 33.0 4.8 1491 305.0 62.6 48.8
Profi Y 50.8 89.3 31.0 2.0 1479 308.0 64.0 66.8 61.0
SW955180 Y 54.5 94.0 35.0 3.0 1857 245.0 65.2 56.9
Trapper Y 58.3 103.0 85.0 7.5 3296 142.0 63.4 34.8 36.9
Voyageur Y 51.5 92.0 30.0 4.5 2606 180.0 64.4 53.4
Aust. Winter MISC 60.3 100.0 73.0 7.0 4455 104.0 64.5 15.2
Whero MISC 59.8 97.0 66.0 7.8 1927 237.0 64.8 48.9
Mean 51.9 92.4 36.0 4.6 1759 270.0 64.5 60.5 --
C.V. % 1.4 1.9 16.0 32.3 11 7.7 1.0 10.8 --
LSD .05 1.0 2.5 8.0 2.0 261 29.0 0.9 9.1 --

Planting Date: May 4, 1999; Harvest Date: By Maturity; Previous Crop: Durum; Type: Y=Yellow, G=Green





Field Pea Tri-County - Wishek



Variety


Vine Length


Seeds per lb


1000 Kwt


Test Wt


Grain Yield
1997-99 Average Yield
in gms lbs/bu bu/ac bu/ac
Atomic 47.9 1982 234 62.8 29.5
Carneval 41.9 2185 208 62.7 29.5 29.4
Majoret 37.8 2255 201 62.8 27.5 33.2
Profi 46.5 1887 243 63.3 33.3 37.2
Trapper 47.3 2169 210 63.3 31.6
Mean 45.2 2062 223 63.0 30.5 --
C.V. % 11.8 11.4 13 0.6 13.8 --
LSD .05 NS NS NS NS NS --



Lentils Carrington


Variety
Days

to Flower

Bloom Duration 1000 Kwt



Seeds per lb


Test Weight


Grain Yield
gms lbs/bu lb/ac
Brewer 42.0 33.3 47.6 9541 55.8 951
CDC Glamis 52.5 20.5 50.7 8959 57.4 795
CDC Milestone 47.5 24.0 28.8 15792 56.0 1531
CDC Richlea 50.5 23.5 41.1 11053 56.1 1290
CDC Vantage 49.3 24.0 38.2 11902 55.2 1062
Crimson 49.5 25.8 29.5 15429 58.3 1663
Eston 46.0 24.8 28.2 16108 58.7 1618
Laird 51.3 24.5 48.6 9409 56.4 837
Mason 43.5 26.3 50.6 8986 55.2 978
Mean 48.0 25.2 40.4 11908 56.5 1192
C.V. % 1.0 5.3 4.1 4 0.9 14
LSD .05 0.7 2.0 2.9 765 0.8 237

Planting Date: May 13, 1999; Harvest Date: September 7, 1999; Previous Crop: Durum





Soybeans - Dryland Carrington





Brand




Variety


Hilum Color


Lodging Score


Days to Maturity


Pod Ht.


Plant Ht.


Seeds per lb.


Test Wt


Seed Yield
1997- 99 Average Yield
0-9 cm in lbs/bu bu/ac bu/ac
NDSU Council C 1.0 123.8 7.0 34.0 3101 56.9 33.5
NDSU Daksoy C 3.8 111.8 6.3 30.0 2838 57.7 41.9 34.3
NDSU Danatto C 5.8 124.8 9.3 34.0 4723 56.9 19.0
NDSU Jim C 2.3 112.8 7.3 28.8 2733 57.9 39.6 36.5
NDSU Traill C 0.8 114.8 5.8 27.8 2840 58.6 44.6 38.0
U of M Agassiz B 0.0 116.5 7.0 31.9 3190 57.2 43.9 37.2
U of M Glacier C 1.8 116.3 6.5 28.5 2823 58.0 43.1 37.4
U of M McCall C 1.0 114.0 7.3 31.6 3291 58.5 38.7 33.8
U of M Ozzie C 0.5 120.3 8.3 32.2 2857 57.6 44.9 35.1
Dekalb CX046 0.8 120.8 31.4 2591 57.2 38.3
Dekalb CX072 1.5 125.0 6.5 31.1 2851 54.9 34.5
Garst DO55RR B 1.5 121.8 7.8 33.6 2719 56.1 56.1
Kaystar X990RR 0.5 124.5 28.8 2974 55.7 33.8
LOL/Cenex L0292 C 0.3 120.3 8.5 32.5 3237 57.9 45.8
Novartis NKSO5-D5 1.3 122.3 30.9 2589 57.7 41.8
Novartis NKSOO-66 0.3 116.0 29.1 2577 47.7 44.7 35.5
Payco 9800 1.3 116.0 6.8 31.2 2970 57.9 47.7
Proseed 9009 1.0 115.3 31.5 3057 57.9 48.1
Mean 1.4 118.7 7.3 31.3 2994 57.4 40.0 --
C.V. % 90.0 0.8 23.2 5.8 4.1 1.4 7.5 --
LSD .05 1.8 1.4 NS 2.6 175.0 1.2 4.2 --

Planting Date: May 26, 1999; Harvest Date: October 7, 1999; Previous Crop: Durum

Hilum Color: C=Clear or yellow, B=Buff or brown.

Soybeans - Irrigated Carrington





Brand




Variety


Hilum Color


Lodging Score


Days to Maturity


Pod Ht.


Plant Height


Seeds per lb.


Test Wt


Seed Yield
1997 - 99 Average Yield
0-9 cm in lbs/bu bu/ac bu/ac
NDSU Council C 1.5 120.8 7.0 35.8 3133 57.8 27.7
NDSU Daksoy C 2.5 111.3 6.3 31.2 3270 58.2 32.3 46.8
NDSU Danatto C 6.8 119.8 9.3 37.6 5779 59.5 19.9
NDSU Jim C 2.3 113.3 7.3 30.8 3152 58.2 34.6 47.8
NDSU Traill C 2.8 114.8 5.8 31.9 3087 58.5 37.8 50.5
U of M Agassiz B 0.3 115.0 7.0 33.4 3456 57.8 33.9 47.8
U of M Glacier C 2.5 113.5 6.5 30.3 3121 58.0 35.7 47.1
U of M McCall C 3.0 114.5 7.3 34.4 3499 58.2 32.7 44.4
U of M Ozzie C 0.3 116.5 8.3 34.2 3046 57.9 36.4 46.7
Dekalb CX025 C 0.3 116.3 9.5 34.5 3411 57.5 29.7
Dekalb CX072 4.3 120.0 6.5 38.5 3232 56.9 24.1
Garst DO55RR B 2.8 119.3 7.8 36.0 3007 58.1 32.1
LOL/Cenex L0083 B 1.8 113.5 7.5 35.7 3299 57.9 35.3
LOL/Cenex L0292 C 1.0 119.8 8.5 34.4 3575 57.7 34.6
Payco 9800 1.5 116.3 6.8 32.3 3474 57.9 29.6
Mean 2.3 116.5 7.3 34.1 3366 58.0 32.4 --
C.V. % 38.8 2.2 23.2 5.6 3.3 0.6 10.9 --
LSD .05 1.3 3.6 NS 2.7 157.0 0.5 5.0 --

Planting Date: May 26, 1999; Harvest Date: October 8, 1999; Previous Crop: Spring Wheat

Hilum Color: C=Clear or yellow, B=Buff or brown.





Dry Edible Beans - Dryland Carrington


Variety


Market Class

Days to Flower

Seeds per lb Test Wt 1997 - 99 Average Seeds per lb



Seed Yield
1997 - 99 Average Yield
lb/bu lbs/ac lbs/ac
AC Alberta Pink 42.7 1637 61.1 2345
AC Earli Red Small Red 44.0 1532 61.5 2008
Beryl Great Northern 48.3 1605 64.1 2633
Bill-Z Pinto 48.7 1388 61.2 1508 2860 2285
Black Knight Black 53.3 2450 60.0 1943
Burke Pinto 46.0 1213 61.3 2603
Caravel Navy 48.7 2143 63.5 2173
Chase Pinto 51.0 1343 60.8 1396 2650 2586
Chicana Pinto 53.3 1427 61.1 2725
Eiben Black 54.0 2735 63.8 2174
Frontier Pinto 51.0 1140 62.4 1231 2689 2393
Hatton Pinto 45.7 1219 62.3 1251 2342 2254
Kodiak Pinto 49.3 1134 60.0 2259
Mckinac Navy 50.7 2574 64.9 2002
Matterhorn Great Northern 48.0 1366 60.7 2589
Maverick Pinto 49.0 1235 60.0 1386 2400 2075
Mayflower Navy 51.7 2424 62.8 2665 1990 1937
Montcalm D. Red Kidney 45.0 966 58.3 1102 1550 1604
Navigator Navy 51.3 2342 64.6 2266
Norstar Navy 48.7 2640 65.4 2720 2019 1849
Othello Pinto 45.0 1303 61.4 1386 2530 2218
Raven Black 54.7 2667 63.3 2021
Redhawk D. Red Kidney 43.3 1047 57.2 1844
Shadow Black 52.0 2129 61.1 1931
Starship Navy 55.0 3201 65.8 2162
T-39 Black 53.7 2306 63.4 2459 2036 2082
Topaz Pinto 46.7 1349 58.8 1324 2235 2080
UI-320 Pinto 45.0 1213 62.7 2556
UI-537 Pink 45.3 1434 62.0 1469 2515 2275
UI-911 Black 50.3 2384 62.7 2423 2056 1743
Winchester Pinto 48.7 1327 62.5 2194
Mean 49.1 1828 62.1 -- 2255 --
C.V. % 2.7 4.6 1.6 -- 10 --
LSD .05 2.1 118.0 1.4 -- 306 --

Planting Date: May 26, 1999; Harvest Date: Various by maturity; Previous Crop: Durum

Dry Edible Beans - Irrigated Carrington



Variety


Market Class

Seeds per lb



Test Wt
1997 - 99 Average Seeds per lb

Yield
1997 - 99 Average Yield
lb/bu lbs/ac lbs/ac
Beryl Great Northern 1591 63.6 2765
Bill-Z Pinto 1328 60.4 1320 2996 3409
Black Knight Black 2278 59.6 1980
Burke Pinto 1161 60.6 3620
Caravel Navy 2016 62.5 2681
Chase Pinto 1313 60.4 1271 3015 3230
Chicana Pinto 1419 61.9 2463
Eiben Black 2633 62.3 2282
Frontier Pinto 1191 62.3 1156 3180 3620
Hatton Pinto 1161 60.8 1152 2484 2917
Kodiak Pinto 1152 60.0 2881
Mckinac Navy 2508 65.4 2496
Matterhorn Great Northern 1448 60.4 3573
Maverick Pinto 1418 60.2 1231 3242 3495
Mayflower Navy 2280 64.5 2286 2687 3041
Montcalm D. Red Kidney 1024 58.0 2111
Navigator Navy 2411 64.2 2942
Norstar Navy 2692 65.8 2564 2744 2906
Othello Pinto 1259 61.9 1242 2825 2748
Raven Black 2327 63.2 2779
Redhawk D. Red Kidney 1347 56.9 1866
Shadow Black 2103 60.1 2447
Starship Navy 2672 65.1 2545
T-39 Black 2185 63.0 2230 2477 3114
Topaz Pinto 1231 57.8 1209 2725 2749
UI-320 Pinto 1082 62.3 3176
UI-537 Pink 1448 61.7 1324 2787 3105
UI-911 Black 2403 62.6 2403 2526 2704
Winchester Pinto 1290 62.2 2650
Mean 1796 61.9 -- 2729 --
C.V. % 9.4 1.3 -- 11 --
LSD .05 238.0 1.1 -- 414 --

Planting Date: May 26, 1999; Harvest Date: Various by maturity; Previous Crop: Spring Wheat







Corn - Dryland Carrington


Brand


Hybrid


RM
Days

to Silk

Ear Height Stalk

Lodging

Harvest Moisture Test

Wt

Grain Yield
in 0-9 % lbs/bu bu/ac
Garst N8993 78 81.7 36.0 0.3 13.3 56.3 106.2
Payco 155 80 84.3 33.7 1.3 15.1 54.9 108.1
Payco 4X309 85 88.7 38.7