Agriculture Communication

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NDSU’s degree programs in Agricultural Communication

 

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Agriculture Communication

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New E-mail Signature Graphic Markets NDSU

NDSU faculty and staff are asked to add a new NDSU graphic to e-mail signatures for organizational marketing. See the options at www.ndsu.edu/vpur/resources/emailsignatures/. Contact the ITS help desk at 231-8685 if you need help getting the graphic into your e-mail signature.
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Write the Right Word - Commas

Whether you use a comma often depends on the sentence. Here are some general rules:

  • Do not use a comma before conjunctions such as "and" and "or" in a simple series. For example: "I worked on the program with Tom, Dick and Harry." "She couldn't decide whether to give the book to Ann, Jane or Lynn."
  • However, use a comma before the last conjunction in a series if the final element of the series also contains a conjunction. For example: "The North Dakota Department of Agriculture, North Dakota Wheat Commission, and NDSU Carrington and Hettinger Research Extension Centers hosted the workshop."
  • Use a comma before the last conjunction in a series if the elements of the series are complex phrases. For example: "Producers need to consider a number of factors in deciding when to harvest, including whether the corn crop has reached the proper stage of maturity, whether the corn is at the optimum moisture level, and whether the weather conditions are favorable."
  • Use commas to set off nonessential phrases, which provide additional details but can be left out and the sentence still makes sense. For example: "NDSU researchers have found that barley and distillers grains fed together provide a safe, palatable diet for ruminant animals, including feed and dairy cattle." You could end the sentence after "ruminant animals" and it still makes sense.
  • Do not set off essential phrases with commas. Essential phrases are critical to the reader understanding what the writer intended. For example: "More information is available in the NDSU Extension Service publication 'Ground-source Heat Pumps.'" The reader wouldn't know which publication the writer was referring to if the name isn't included.
Ellen Crawford, (701) 231-5391, ellen.crawford@ndsu.edu
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Ag in the Classroom Mini-grants Available

About $10,000 is being offered as mini-grants for ag projects for K-12 students by the N.D. Agriculture in the Classroom Council. The mini-grants will fund hands-on activities that develop and enrich understanding of agriculture. Individuals or groups such as teachers, 4-H leaders, commodity groups and others interested in teaching young people about the importance of agriculture in North Dakota are welcome to apply. Grant funds can be used for supplies, curricula, printing, materials, food-based projects, equipment, etc.

For guidelines and an application, contact Beth Bakke-Stenehjem at (701) 471-5004 or go to http://ndaginclassroom.org/minigrant.htm. The deadline for applying is Sept. 9.

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September 2010 eXtension Professional Development Opportunities

Upcoming and recorded eXtension professional development opportunities now are more easily listed at http://www.extension.org/learn

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This month's offerings include:

  • Designing for Online Audiences - 1 p.m. Central Time, Sept. 8
  • Free Phone Calls through Gmail and Google Voice - 1 p.m. Central Time, Sept. 9
  • Beginning with the Ask an Expert Widget and Ask an Expert Discussion - 1 p.m. Central Time, Sept. 16
  • Introduction to Google Docs for Workflow Management - 1 p.m. Central Time, Sept. 29
  • Getting Started in Second Life - 1 p.m. Central Time, Sept. 30
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How Many Grammatical Errors Can You Find?

The following paragraph is taken from an actual newsletter I received recently. Drop an e-mail to becky.koch@ndsu.edu with a list of the errors you find in it, and whoever finds the most will receive a big congratulations in the next Let's Communicate.

North Dakota State University has many well known buildings on campus. Minard Hall ranks as one of these so called 'pivotal' buildings both historically speaking, and just by the shear number of colleges and departments which occupy it's roughly 72,000 square feet. Over the years nearly every undergraduate student has either traversed through its corridors or attentively sat in its classrooms. With the first footings and foundations poured over 109 years ago in 1901, it is one of the oldest buildings on campus. Two more additions were added the 'main' building in 1918 and 1929, with a third addition connecting Minard Hall and Reinecke Hall in 2002, known as the 'Minard Annex'.

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Calendar Needs Your Info

The NDSU online calendar soon will be more prominently displayed at www.ndsu.edu, and the home page will feature an event or two each day. Send detailed information about events for the entire university and/or community to linda.mccaw@ndsu.edu for possible inclusion.

More events are included in the Agriculture and University Extension calendar for statewide marketing, sharing among staff and attempts to avoid conflicts. Please enter field days, multicounty/regional meetings, in-service trainings, fairs, public educational events and more by logging in to the Ag Info Center at http://www.ext.nodak.edu:3000/home/signin.

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Marketing Resources and Ideas For Your Use

The Ag Communication department has a variety of marketing resources available for sale and checkout. These include Agriculture and University Extension pocket folders, note cards, posters and decals for sale at http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/agcomm/marketing/marketing-materials  plus banners and table runners for checkout at  http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/agcomm/displays-exhibits

Also on that website are PowerPoint templates and NDSU, N.D. Agricultural Experiment Station and NDSU Extension Service logos. Start your PowerPoint with a logo, place it on nearly all printed materials and websites, have it up in your office. Logos are an easy and effective way to market NDSU.
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Purchase Your Own Custom Retractable Banner

Ag Com now has retractable banner stands you can purchase for your own office. Why pay more through sign shops and over the Internet when you can purchase durable metal canister retractable banner stands through Ag Communication? A retractable banner stand with custom-made vinyl banner and nylon carry case is $200. Banner design and set-up labor time is extra. Also available are vinyl table runners, which can be ordered with Extension, AES or NDSU logos as well as personalized with your county, REC, department or other name for $60. Set-up time is extra.

John Grindahl, (701) 231-7898, john.grindahl@ndsu.edu

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Write the Right Word - "then" & "than"

“Then” and “than” don’t mean the same thing and can’t be used interchangeably.

“Then” refers to a specific time. For example, “I can’t go on vacation then” or “He didn’t leave then.”

It also can mean immediately or soon after: “The rain stopped, then started again;” in next order of time: “We ate supper, then dessert;” in next order of place: “On her right is her dad, then her sister;” and in that case or under the circumstances: “If you are sick, then you should stay home.”

“Than” usually indicates comparison. For example, “The producer chose to plant corn rather than wheat.” It also may indicate choice or diversity: “I had no choice other than to leave immediately.” “We’d rather walk than drive.”

Ellen Crawford, (701) 231-5391, ellen.crawford@ndsu.edu

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