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NDSU Research Extension Centers Holding Field Days

Field Days 2009

It is that time of year when NDSU Research Extension Centers across the state hold their annual field days. It is a chance for everyone to learn more about the research that is carried out at the centers and to ask questions.

 

July 16 - Agronomy Seed Farm, Casselton

July 17, 8:30 am - Carrington Research Extension Center

July 18, 9:00 am - North Central Research Extension Center, Minot

July 19 - Langdon Research Extension Center

July 24 - Williston Research Extension Center

July 31 - Oakes Irrigation Research Center

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Cut Hay When Mature

hay ready to harvestNow is the time to start cutting hay in North Dakota. Although this is early for the first hay harvest of the growing season, weather conditions this spring have led to alfalfa and grasses maturing about 10 days ahead of normal. Cutting now will set the stage for a good second cutting, provided the crop receives adequate rain. Tonnage from the first cut may be lower than it was last year, but this decrease should be offset with a second cutting later in the season. (NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center photo)

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Scout for Flying Cutworm Moths

CutwormsThere are more than 100 species of cutworms in North Dakota. There have been many observations of cutworm moths (or miller moths) flying around the lights of houses and farm sheds. Also, approximately 20 cutworm species are economically important in field crops.

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Sign Up for Fusarium Head Blight Alerts

Scab Kernels

Although the wheat flowering period seems far down the road, the season is moving fast, so this is a good time to sign up for Fusarium head blight alerts. Producers can receive the alerts by mobile phone, email or both. Updates on other wheat or barley disease risks also can be provided. (Photo courtesy U.S. Wheat & Barley Initiative)

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Ergot Can Cause Lambing Problems

ergotSheep producers should have their grain and hay tested for ergot before feeding it to their animals. Ergot is a fungus that can form in seed heads of cereal grains, such as wheat, barley, oats, rye and triticale, and mature grasses, such as brome, timothy, quack grasses and blue grasses. Feeding ewes ergot-contaminated grain during late gestation has resulted in premature births, severe dystocia associated with a failure to dilate, and lower milk production. (Photo by Reid Redden, NDSU)

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Prevent Problems in Stored Grain

grain binWarm spring temperatures following a warm winter could lead to problems such as mold growth in stored grain. Problems are especially likely in grain that exceeds the recommended storage moisture content or did not stay cool during the winter. Dry grain that has a higher than recommended moisture content. Regularly monitor the grain for temperature, moisture content and insect infestations. Also keep grain cool during the spring and summer. (Photo by Ken Hellevang, NDSU)

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Calf Feeding Frequency Could Make a Difference

calves in dividers.jpgEven though spring is around the corner, dairy calves still need the added nutrients provided in cold-weather feeding. One way to cut the labor costs of feeding liquid to calves in the form or milk or milk replacer is to reduce the number of daily feedings from two to one. However, research has shown that calves have better growth rates if they receive nutrients three times a day. Producing more efficient animals could offset the additional labor costs. (Photo by J.W. Schroeder, NDSU)

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Prevent Hardware Disease in Cattle

heifers eating from tiresTires can make great containers to hold feed and water for cattle, but those tires also can pose health risks. If the tires have wire in the walls, the wire can break off and cattle can swallow it. Cattle ingesting wire can develop hardware disease, a condition that could result in their death. Performing regular maintenance on the tires is the best way to avoid hardware disease. (Photo by Carl Dahlen, NDSU)

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Shear Sheep Before Lambing Time

fleeceShearing sheep before lambing begins can have a tremendous inpact on flock productivity. Research shows shearing prior to lambing may improve blood flow to unborn lambs, resulting in healthier and more productive lambs. Shearing before lambing also can result in a cleaner environment for newborn lambs, help the lambs nurse sooner and improve the value of the wool clip.

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2012 Insect Management Guide

Sunflower MothThe 2012 Field Crop Insect Management Guide has information and pesticide recommendations for most crops grown in North Dakota. The guide also has information on managing pests on rangeland and noncrop areas. The recommendations conform to the current federal and state laws and regulations relating to pesticide chemicals.

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