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Protecting Cattle from the Cold

Cattle in Winter 4

Cold temperatures bring on challenges for cow-calf producers. Producers need to provide balanced rations, modify the environment to provide protection and give the cattle plenty of water. Cattle that suffer hypothermia or frostbite are more prone to other disease conditions and certainly do not perform as well as cattle that are warm, dry and out of the wind. (Photo courtesy Carrington Research Extension Center)

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Variety Trials Provide Valuable Information

variety trials 2012Selecting the crop varieties that will grow best in a particular area can make a huge impact on a producer's profitability. Each year, NDSU agricultural researchers conduct variety trials to help determine which varieties produce the best yields under a range of growing conditions. The researchers evaluate the varieties based on a number of characteristics. Using that data, producers should choose the varieties that, on average, perform the best at multiple locations near their farming operation during several years. (NDSU photo)

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Determine Ewe Pregnancy Early

ultrasoundDetecting pregnancy in sheep early can make a big impact on a producer's bottom line. Knowing whether ewes are pregnant can help producers provide the animals with the feed they need when they need it. Producers also will know which ewes are producing more than one lamb and may need extra assistance. Sheep producers have two options for detecting pregnancy early: an ultrasound and blood testing. (Photo by Reid Redden, NDSU)

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Potatoes Possible Cattle Feed Source

potatoes as cattle feedPotatoes could become a feed option for cattle this year. Drought conditions led to poor yields in forage crops, high hay and corn prices, and a larger supply of diseased or malformed potatoes. Livestock experts say potatoes have similar feed quality as barley on a dry-matter basis and could be a relatively low-cost feedstuff, but the cost of transporting them could be high, and cattle should be adapted slowly to rations containing potatoes to avoid digestive upsets. (NDSU photo)

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Protect Your Hay Bales

hay balesWith hay yields down and prices up this year, protecting your hay bales is extremely important. Round bales, the most common form of baling, are designed to shed water, but hay loss still can occur if they aren't covered. Options for protecting bales include storing them indoors and stacking them on a pad of stone or porous material and covering them with plastic. (NDSU photo)

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Scout for Spider Mites in Soybeans

Spider Mite Webbing on Soybeans

During hot and dry seasons, spider mites can cause major problems in soybeans. Common symptoms are stippling and leaf discoloration. Early detection using proper scouting techniques will help prevent crop damage and facilitate rescue treatments.

(Spider mite webbing photo courtesy of Janet Knodel)

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Volunteer Peas or Small Grains Have Animal Feed Potential

Cover Crop

Some producers are looking at feed alternatives because of dry conditions in some parts of North Dakota. There may be some opportunities after the early season crops, such as peas and wheat, are harvested.

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Combat Heat Stress Proactively

heat-stressed cow

Being proactive is the best way to deal with heat stress in cattle. Trying to help livestock once they are suffering from heat stress may be too late. Having a solid management plan in place to address heat stress helps maintain animal performance and avoid animal deaths in severe cases. (Photo by Carl Dahlen, NDSU)

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NDSU Research Extension Centers Holding Field Days

Field Days 2009

It is that time of year when NDSU Research Extension Centers across the state hold their annual field days. It is a chance for everyone to learn more about the research that is carried out at the centers and to ask questions.

 

July 16 - Agronomy Seed Farm, Casselton

July 17, 8:30 am - Carrington Research Extension Center

July 18, 9:00 am - North Central Research Extension Center, Minot

July 19 - Langdon Research Extension Center

July 24 - Williston Research Extension Center

July 31 - Oakes Irrigation Research Center

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Cut Hay When Mature

hay ready to harvestNow is the time to start cutting hay in North Dakota. Although this is early for the first hay harvest of the growing season, weather conditions this spring have led to alfalfa and grasses maturing about 10 days ahead of normal. Cutting now will set the stage for a good second cutting, provided the crop receives adequate rain. Tonnage from the first cut may be lower than it was last year, but this decrease should be offset with a second cutting later in the season. (NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center photo)

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