NDSU Agriculture

Accessibility


NDSU Agriculture

| Share

NDSU Research Extension Center Field Days

field days

It is that time of year when NDSU Research Extension Centers across the state hold their annual field days. Field days are a chance for researchers and Extension faculty to share information on topics such as: ■ New crop varieties ■ Better production methods ■ Weed control ■ Soil health ■ Grazing intensity ■ Cattle nutrition and genetic disorders ■ Irrigation ■ Manure management ■ Precision agriculture ■ Biofuel development

Document Actions

| Share

Yellow Wheat

Nitrogen deficiency in wheat.png

During a wet spring, wheat plants may become yellow. This is usually due to a nitrogen deficiency, but not always. If the plants are examined when the yellowing begins to develop, it is often possible to determine if the deficiency is due to a shortage of nitrogen, sulfur or iron by the appearance and location of the symptoms on the plant.

Document Actions

| Share

Delayed Wheat Planting

wheat in sky

In an effort to get crops in quickly, small grain growers may be thinking about forgoing seed treatments and plant a higher population instead.  How much of a risk are you willing to take in choosing fungicide seed treatments versus high plant populations? Knowledge of the land and yield expectations will help decide the type of risks you are willing to take.

Document Actions

| Share

Sign Up for Crop and Pest Report

conservation tillEach season brings new challenges and pest problems in crop production. One way to stay informed and effectively manage any problem is to sign up for the weekly “Crop and Pest Report.” Each issue from May to September contains valuable information about insect and disease problems, pest alerts, integrated pest management strategies, pesticide updates, agronomy and fertility issues, horticulture problems, reports from the NDSU Plant Diagnostic Laboratory and a weather outlook. Also, please "like" the "Crop and Pest Report" on Facebook.

Document Actions

| Share

Noxious and Troublesome Weeds

thistle

Noxious weeds tend to grow aggressively, multiply quickly without natural controls, and adversely affect native habitats, croplands and fauna. Most noxious weeds were introduced into an ecosystem by ignorance, mismanagement or accident. Occasionally some noxious weeds are native to an area.

Document Actions

| Share

Minerals for Cattle

cow

Why are minerals important? What happens if cattle don’t get enough of a particular mineral or too much? While varying mineral levels may not have the immediate impact of a major shift in energy or protein levels, the long-term effects on animal health, longevity and growth are significant.

Document Actions

| Share

Corn Hybrid Trial Results

corn

In 2013, corn hybrid trials were conducted by NDSU research and Extension personnel throughout North Dakota. The hybrids were planted in replicated plots in each location. However, plot size, number of replications and experimental design varied by location. The 2013 growing season started out wet and cold, so planting significantly lagged behind the long-term average. Also, conditions were dry during July and August, causing drought stress that negatively impacted yield.

Document Actions

| Share

2014 Sugar Beet Production Guide

sugar beet spraying

The 2014 Sugar Beet Production Guide offers a plan for profitable sugar beet production. The guide provides useful information to assist growers in making timely management decisions on weed control, soil fertility, insect and disease control, and most other aspects of sugar beet production in Minnesota and North Dakota.

Document Actions

| Share

Alternative Land Lease Agreements

conservation tillage

More than half the cropland in the north-central region of the U.S. is rented, so rental rate and leasing information is highly sought after by landowners and land operators. AgLease101.org is a website that has multistate materials to help landowners and land operators discuss and resolve issues to avoid legal risk.

Document Actions

| Share

Biosecurity Vital in Combating Swine Virus

Pig 1

Implementing strict biosecurity procedures is as important as ever, now that North Dakota has its first case of the porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDv). The PEDv has killed more than 4 million U.S. pigs since it was discovered last year. Biosecurity involves making sure the swine barn is clean and virus-free, and establishing a line of separation between the clean area (the barn) and the dirty area (anywhere outside the barn). It also includes washing boots and clothing before and after being around swine, and cleaning and disinfecting vehicles used to transport pigs.

Document Actions

Document Actions

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.