NDSU Agriculture

Accessibility


NDSU Agriculture

| Share

Managing Cattle During Winter

cattle in winterBeef cattle increase body heat production as a response to severe cold exposure by increasing their metabolic rate (heart rate, respiration and blood flow). This means that animals eat more during cold weather to meet their maintenance requirements. Also, cattle that suffer hypothermia or frostbite are more prone to other disease conditions and certainly do not perform as well as cattle that are warm, dry and out of the wind. Photo by Cindy Cornett Seigle.

Document Actions

| Share

Preventive Herd Health Program: Checklist for Beef Producers

cow photo

Beef producers are urged to establish a specific preventive herd health program in consultation with a veterinarian. Also, each cow-calf operation is different and, therefore, has unique considerations to achieve herd health. Photo by Dave Wild

Document Actions

| Share

Pythium Damping-off of Soybeans

soybean damping off

Damping-off, the rotting and death of seeds and seedlings, can be a devastating disease and is of great economic importance to soybean production. Damping-off mainly affects soybean plants prior to seed germination and throughout the seedling stage. Any field with damping-off may experience a significant stand reduction.

Document Actions

| Share

2014 North Dakota Beef Report

cattle

The 2014 beef report provides the most recent research related to beef cattle, beef products and environmental and range sciences from North Dakota. The beef research programs at the NDSU main campus in Fargo and the Research Extension Centers across North Dakota are dedicated to serving the producers and stakeholders in North Dakota by developing knowledge and technology to improve the management, efficiency and production of high-quality cattle and beef using sustainable and safe approaches. Photo by Saml

Document Actions

| Share

2014 Winter Wheat Variety Trial Results

wheat harvest

During the 2013-14 growing season, 560,000 acres of winter wheat were harvested. The state’s winter wheat yield this season was estimated at 44 bushels per acre, which is up from last year’s yield of 43 bushels per acre. Jerry was the most popular variety, occupying 26 percent of the acres planted. Decade, WB Matlock, Overland and SY Wolf followed Jerry in popularity with 18, 7, 6 and 4 percent of the acreage, respectively. Photo by Scott Bauer

Document Actions

| Share

Farm Financial Performance

farm

There was a significant decline in financial performance in 2013 because of sharply lower grain prices and about 8 percent higher crop production costs per acre. Median net farm income dropped 62 percent to $90,629 from the record high profit year of 2012. In 2013, more than 70 percent of the farms were crop farms and the median age of a farm operator was 48.

Document Actions

| Share

Dealing With High-moisture Corn

corn grinding

High-moisture corn offers many advantages for producers who feed beef or dairy cattle. However, successfully using high-moisture corn requires attention to harvest timing, processing, storage conditions and feeding management.

Document Actions

| Share

2014- Another Successful Year of Pest Scouting

Halvorson

During the growing season, North Dakota producers need up-to-date information on pest risks to implement timely and appropriate management strategies.

To provide that information, the integrated pest management (IPM) survey, coordinated by Extension state and area specialists, detect the presence and severity of diseases and insects that are threatening major crops.

Document Actions

| Share

Corn Silage Quality

silage cutting

As a rule of thumb, corn silage quality will be optimum if the grain fill is allowed to occur until the milk line is one-half to two-thirds of the way down the kernel. Animal studies indicate that optimum intake of corn silage also occurs at this maturity. Harvesting at this stage usually results in near optimum moisture content for storage of the corn silage.

Document Actions

| Share

Managing Saline Soils

saline

Saline soils have salt levels high enough that crop yields begin to suffer or cropping is impractical. Several factors contribute to the development of saline soils. A high water table is a prime requirement. Recognizing how and why salts accumulate is the first step in farming profitably on land interspersed with saline soils. Preventing further encroachment of salinity and addressing remediation strategies are other steps.

Document Actions

Document Actions

Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.