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New NDSU Podcast Service Available (05/15/14)

Sound Ag Advice is an agricultural news podcast available from the North Dakota State University Extension Service at http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/soundagadvice.

New NDSU Podcast Service Available

Sound Ag Advice is an agricultural news podcast availablesound AG Advice from the North Dakota State University Extension Service at http://www.ag.ndsu.edu/soundagadvice. A new podcast is posted each week. The podcasts feature agricultural topics ranging from rangeland management to crop prices. Each podcast is three to four minutes long. Listeners can download the podcasts or subscribe to them through My Yahoo, iTunes or Google. Listeners also can receive email notification when new podcasts become available. Subscribers using iTunes will have access to the podcasts on their iPhone, iPad, iPod or computer. Android phone or tablet users can subscribe to the service by downloading a free podcast player app. “These podcasts are just another example of how the NDSU Extension Service is bringing North Dakotans research-based information to help improve their lives,” says Charlie Stoltenow, NDSU Extension Service assistant director for agriculture and natural resources.

Richard Mattern

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Weather/Crop Phenology Maps (05/08/14)

Maps detailing percent normal rainfall, departure from normal average air temperature, and accumulated wheat growing degree days.

Weather/Crop Phenology Maps

weather.precipitation

weather.wheat

weather.temperature

 

F. Adnan Akyuz, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Climatology

North Dakota State Climatologist

http://www.ndsu.edu/ndsco/


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Crop Management Field School (05/08/14)

NDSU Extension Service’s annual crop management field school will be offered Thursday, June 19, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Carrington Research Extension Center (CREC).

Crop Management Field School

NDSU Extension Service’s annual crop management field school will be offered Thursday, June 19, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Carrington Research Extension Center (CREC). The school will provide hands-on training on crop, pest and soil management using field research and demonstration plots. Field sessions include weed identification; herbicide mode-of-action; row crop intensive management; reducing soil erosion and increasing soil health; soybean cyst nematode management. For further details and preregistration information, go to the CREC website or contact the CREC at (701) 652-2951. Preregistration (completed form and $75) is required by June 16 ($100 after June 16). CCAs participating in the event will receive six continuing education credits.

roger ashely herbicide mode of action

Greg Endres

Area Extension Specialist/Cropping Systems

NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center

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Roger Ashley

Area Extension Specialist/Cropping Systems

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South-Central ND (05/08/14)

Information from the South-Central region of North Dakota.

South-Central ND

The geographic area covered by this report includes a northern border of Sheridan County to Eddy County southward to Sargent County and west to Emmons County.

The region’s rainfall, based on NDAWN, during May 1-6 ranged from 0 (Lisbon) to 0.4 (Harvey) inches. Light snow occurred in the Carrington area on May 4. The region’s soil temperatures (4-inch depth) on May 6 ranged from the mid 40s to mid-50s on bare soil and the upper 30s to 50 degrees under sod. Corn growing degree day units are minimal – ranging from 13 to 24 units during May 1-6 (120 units needed from planting to plant emergence).

Small grain seeding occurred primarily south of I94 during late April and some corn has recently been planted. May 1 was the first planting date for research trials at the Carrington Research Extension Center.

While we are impatiently waiting for the weather to improve, remember to monitor fields for weed emergence (e.g. winter annuals, kochia and quackgrass) and be prepared for timely control.

Greg Endres

Area Extension Specialist/Cropping Systems

NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center

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Roger Ashley

Area Extension Specialist/Cropping Systems

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Northeast Region (05/08/14)

Information from the Northeast region of North Dakota.

Farm activity is minimal in northeast North Dakota.  Rare scattered fields have been seeded with spring wheat due to the late spring.  Optimal spring wheat seeding is the first week of May, north of Highway 2.  However this year, very few fields will be seeded by this timing.  Winter wheat fields with snow cover have weathered the frigid winter very well.  Places of no snow cover like hilltops have reduced plant stands.

Lesley Lubenow

Area Extension Specialist/Agronomy

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How To Submit Samples To The Plant Diagnostic Lab (05/08/14)

The NDSU Plant Diagnostic lab is open to the public. To support two technicians and to be able to purchase supplies and maintain equipment, a small fee applies to processing and diagnosing samples. Services and fees are available online at www.ag.ndsu.edu/pdl.

How To Submit Samples To The Plant Diagnostic Lab

The NDSU Plant Diagnostic lab is open to the public.  To support two technicians and to be able to purchase supplies and maintain equipment, a small fee applies to processing and diagnosing samples.  Services and fees are available online at www.ag.ndsu.edu/pdl. In general, the lab stays busy through the winter months processing samples related to seed health testing and working on long-term projects, with routine samples beginning to pick up in the spring.  Typical spring samples include evergreens, turf, and winter wheat.  This summer, the lab will be short a technician as the assistant diagnostician, Jesse Ostrander, also fulfills the role of seed health technician until a new applicant can be chosen to fill that position (the position is expected to be filled by late summer 2014), but it is anticipated that the turnaround time for samples including virus testing and nematode screening should remain at about 36-48 hours from the time the sample is received.  Routine diagnosis can vary from > 1 week to 2 weeks out depending on the sample.

When submitting a sample to the Plant Diagnostic Lab, please be sure to include the contact information of the submitter and list any other entity who you would like to receive a copy of the report or the invoice.  It is also important to provide as much information about the sample being submitted as possible.  To facilitate this process, a lab form is available at www.ag.ndsu.edu/pdl.  The form can be filled out by hand or online, and a complete form should be sent in with each sample.  Final reports of diagnoses are mailed along with invoices.  Reports can be emailed if an email address is provided.  Pre-payment is not required.

Plant Problem Diagnosis: For crops and herbaceous ornamental plants, try to send several affected plants showing a range of symptoms.  Dead plants are rarely informative and we ask that you instead send a representation of a healthy plant, a plant in decline, and a severely affected plant.  Try to send in the entire plant, including the roots, whenever possible as above-ground symptoms can be related to a problem with the lower stem or roots.  This information also applies to turf, the difference being that you would collect a sample from a healthy portion of the lawn and a portion in decline.  Photos showing the distribution of the symptoms in a landscape are also useful.

For woody species (trees and shrubs), images may be needed in order to determine the best sampling strategy.  To prevent a decline in sample quality, wrap the foliage in DRY paper towels before placing the entire sample in a plastic bag.  For all samples, shipping earlier in the week is best (Monday through Wednesday).  Pack the sample so that the leaves cannot come into contact with soil (if included).  Store the sample in a cool space such as a refrigerator or in a cooler with ice until it can be shipped.  Samples from out of state must be double bagged and sent in a sturdy box.

Identification requests – weeds/plants, insects, fungi/molds: For plant identification, whole plants are usually needed, and the flowering stage is extremely helpful.  For insect identification, small insects may be sent in vials of 70% alcohol.  Larger insects, such as moths, should be packed in cotton placed in a sturdy box to avoid crushing.  If submitting an insect pest of plants, please include a sample of the host plant if possible.  For fungus/mold identification, whole mushrooms should be wrapped in dry paper towels and packed in a sturdy box to avoid crushing; household mold samples usually consist of discolored paper from sheetrock or shavings of affected wood trim.  These should be placed in a small resealable plastic bag.  Tape mounts, using crystal clear scotch tape and placing it over an affected area, lifting, and attaching to wax paper, can also be submitted.

Kasia Kinzer

NDSU Plant Diagnostician

 

 

Jesse Ostrander

 NDSU Assistant Plant Diagnostician

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Plant Diagnostic Lab 2013 Highlights (05/08/14)

In 2013, the NDSU Plant Diagnostic Lab processed over ¬¬¬2,330 samples.

Plant Diagnostic Lab 2013 Highlights

In 2013, the NDSU Plant Diagnostic Lab processed over ­­­2,330 samples.  Samples were divided into the following five categories:  Reasearch - 14%, routine diagnosis - 25%, phytosanitary - 26­­%, seed health  - ­­28%, and survey samples - 7%.  In the category of routine diagnosis, 35% of the samples were submitted by NDSU Extension agents and Extension research specialists.  Common problems that were diagnosed for samples in the routine diagnosis category included stigmina needle blight of spruce, viruses of small grains, soybean cyst nematode, and environemntal stress-related problems (such as drought, salts, root compaction).  Details can be found in the NDSU Plant Diagnostic Lab Annual Report, online at www.ag.ndsu.edu/pdl/periodic-reports.

Kasia Kinzer

NDSU Plant Diagnostician

 

Jesse Ostrander

 NDSU Assistant Plant Diagnostician

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Start Clean (05/08/14)

Many weeds are much easier to control through soil-applied herbicides rather than relying only on POST herbicides – namely kochia and lambsquarters.

Start Clean

Many weeds are much easier to control through soil-applied herbicides rather than relying only on POST herbicides – namely kochia and lambsquarters. Many soil–applied herbicides control these and many others at germination. Seed-bed preparation in conventional tillage usually kills emerged weeds but larger weeds may survive the tillage operation especially on uneven ground. No-till systems require multiple chemicals for early pre-plant burndown applications. Glyphosate is usually the main component in the herbicide mixture but kochia and lambquarters biotypes in North Dakota have shown varying level of resistance/tolerance to glyphosate. Surviving plants after the first glyphosate application will continue to grow and will certainly be harder to control with increasing size. There are few effective POST herbicides in most broadleaf crops and many are “contact” herbicides that only control small weeds. Using soil-applied herbicides is a simple and easy solution to many hard-to-control weed problems.

                1. Start clean at planting

                2. Use effective foundation/soil-applied herbicides

                3. Dead weeds don’t make seed!

 

Rich Zollinger

Extension Weed Specialist

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Don’t Forget the Pre. (05/08/14)

Following the rapid adoption of glyphosate resistant crops in North Dakota the use of foundation/soil-applied herbicides dropped to less than 10% of the acres.

Don’t Forget the Pre.

Following the rapid adoption of glyphosate resistant crops in North Dakota the use of foundation/soil-applied herbicides dropped to less than 10% of the acres. The latest North Dakota Pesticide Use Survey shows foundation/soil applied herbicide use is still very low in crops where glyphosate (Roundup Ready) and glufosinate (Liberty) resistant crops are used. It is not difficult to observe the result of overuse of one herbicide – the number and area covered of glyphosate resistant weeds have increased. To reduce the risk of developing herbicide-resistant weeds and promote good land stewardship the use of effective foundation/soil-applied herbicide in all crops are recommended. Consider the following reasons:

  1. Maximize profits by maintaining maximum crop yield.
  2. Reduce early-season weed competition.
  3. Provide residual control of grass and broadleaf weeds to reduce subsequent flushes through spring and early summer.
  4. Lengthen the time before the first postemergence herbicide application is required.
  5. Increase the use of alternative herbicide mechanisms of action, since many soil-applied herbicides do not control emerged weeds when applied postemergence.
  6. Reduce the number of plants present at the time of the postemergence application thereby reducing the likelihood of selecting for herbicide-resistant biotypes to postemergence herbicides.
  7. Reduce the size of weeds present at the time of the postemergence herbicide application.

Rich Zollinger

Extension Weed Specialist

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Management of Dandelion and Key Weeds in No-Tillage Soybean (05/08/14)

Despite cold soil temperatures which has delayed dandelion emergence, managing dandelion in no-tillage soybean will be an issue again this season.

Management of Dandelion and Key Weeds in No-Tillage Soybean

Despite cold soil temperatures which has delayed dandelion emergence, managing dandelion in no-tillage soybean will be an issue again this season.  Some have inquired about the use of Sharpen.  Sharpen or Verdict may kill new seedlings but only burn dandelion leaves of perennial forms of dandelion (plants > 1 year of age) and plants will likely recover later.  If a no-tillage soybean field has dandelion, an effective herbicide treatment is glyphosate at 1.125 to 1.5 pounds acid equivalent per acre (lb ae/A) plus 2,4-D ester at 1 pt/A plus Express SG at 0.5 oz/A plus MSO or HSMOC adjuvant at 1.5 pt/A at seven days prior to planting.  If glyphosate-resistant horseweed/marestail, kochia, or common ragweed is present in addition to dandelion, the addition of Sharpen at 1.5 fl oz/A or Verdict at 7.5 fl oz/A should improve the control of horseweed, common ragweed, and kochia and provide additional residual control compared to Sharpen at 1 fl oz/A or Verdict at 5 fl oz/A.  If Sharpen or Verdict is added to the tank-mixture at the high-end use rates mentioned above then soybean planting must be delayed until 14 days after application for all soils having > 2.0% organic matter and finer than a course soil texture.  The addition of sulfentrazone (Spartan) products with the glyphosate, 2,4-D ester, and Express will improve control of glyphosate-resistant kochia present at the time of application and improve residual control compared to Sharpen, but it will not assist in the control of horseweed, common ragweed, and may likely reduce dandelion control.  The addition of MSO or HSMOC adjuvant to the sulfentrazone, glyphosate, 2,4-D, and Express SG combination should enhance control of emerged kochia, but likely none of the other glyphosate-resistant weeds.  When applying Sharpen, Verdict, or products containing sulfentrazone in a burndown application, the water volume should be greater than 15 gallons per acre, utilize medium-sized spray droplets and reduce travel speeds to maximize spray coverage.

Rich Zollinger

Extension Weed Specialist

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