Crop & Pest Report

Accessibility


Crop & Pest Report - All

| Share

South Central ND (09/11/14)

Information from the South Central region of North Dakota.

According to NDAWN, rainfall during September 1-9 ranged from 0.1 inches (Harvey and Oakes) to 2.5 inches (Fingal). Crop damage from hail occurred during a September 4 storm primarily along Hwy 200 in Wells County. As of September 9, accumulated growing degree day (GDD) units for corn planted on May 15 ranged from 1733 (Carrington) to 2012 (Oakes). Compared to the 5-year average for the period of May 15 to September 9, GDD units were minus 116 (Wishek) to plus 10 (Marion). Current frost potential adds additional concerns of late-season crops reaching maturity.

The region’s cereal harvest may average about 65% completed.  Small grain yields generally are excellent but the continued wet and most recently cool weather will further challenge seed quality during the balance of harvest.  Dry bean and flax harvest recently started.

Corn stages generally range from dough to dent (R4-5). Most soybean fields are in the late seed formation to initial maturity stages (R6-7) with some early maturing varieties mature (R8 stage). Early planted sunflower are at R8 stage (back of head yellow with green bracts).

Greg Endres

Area Extension Specialist/Cropping Systems

NDSU Carrington Research Extension Center

Document Actions
| Share

Weather/Crop Phenology Maps (09/11/14)

Maps detailing corn accumulated daily growing days, percent normal rainfall, departure from normal average air temperature, and accumulated wheat growing degree days.

Weather/Crop Phenology Maps

wthr.akyuz.corn

wthr.akyuz.precipitation

wthr.akyuz.temperature

wthr.akyuz.wheat

F. Adnan Akyuz, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Climatological Practices

North Dakota State Climatologist

Document Actions
| Share

Northwest ND (09/11/14)

Information from the Northwest region of North Dakota.

This past week we received about a 0.50 inch of rain. Harvest has been slow but this past weekend producers were able to cut spring wheat. Most of the barley and field peas have been harvested. Yields were scattered but overall an average to slightly about average. The small grains have disease, discoloration and protein issues. Initial yields have been above average. Corn and soybeans in the valley and region could use some more heat units before a frost.

Chet Hill

Area Ag Diversification Specialist

Williston Research Extension Center

Document Actions
| Share

North Central ND (09/11/14)

Information from the North Central region of North Dakota.

European Corn Borer 

Low to average densities of European corn borer larvae have been observed mainly in fields of non-Bt corn, silage corn and sweet corn in the north central region of North Dakota. Scouting and pest management strategies for European corn borers probably need to be followed if one is growing non-Bt corn in the next crop season. For more information about European corn borer and management options, please refer to the NDSU Extension publication European Corn Borer Management in North Dakota.

chapara.1

chapara.2

Venkata Chapara

Area Extension Specialist/Crop Protection

NCREC, Minot, ND-58701

Document Actions
| Share

Weed Control in 2014, a Reflection on the Cropping Season (09/11/14)

It’s the time of the year when many growers are preparing for fall harvest. It’s also the time of the year when growers begin to look ahead to 2015.

Weed Control in 2014, a Reflection on the Cropping Season

It’s the time of the year when many growers are preparing for fall harvest.  It’s also the time of the year when growers begin to look ahead to 2015.  I am writing to remind you there is some extremely important data to be collected in fields; data that needs to be collected ahead of combine harvest.  That is, notes on weed species and density and if possible, maps that are spatially accurate and demonstrate where you observed tough weeds in fields in 2014.  

These data are critical as growers develop a weeds management strategy for each field in their farming operation.  Ahead of the 2015 season, use your scouting data, field notes and maps and your 2015 cropping plans to develop a comprehensive weeds management strategy after carefully considering the ‘biology’ of the ‘tough weeds’ challenges in your fields.  Learn about germination and emergence habits of weeds and temporally when seeds may begin to germinate and emergence in fields.  And above all, study the various herbicide options in-crop, giving careful consideration to mode of action, application timing, possible tank-mix partners to augment control and any potential rotational restrictions various herbicides may have for future crops planted in the field rotation. 

Unexpected weather will always provide a wrinkle to the weeds management strategy.  Develop a backup plan in the event that your strategy needs to be adjusted due to unforeseen circumstances.  And finally, don’t be afraid to reevaluate the weeds management strategy over time.   Adjustment based on actual data is a good thing.  Here’s to a safe and productive 2014 harvest and best wishes for 2015.   

Tom Peters

Extension Sugarbeet Agronomist

NDSU & U of MN

Document Actions
| Share

2014 Sugarbeet Growers Survey (09/11/14)

The 46th annual sugarbeet production practices survey will be mailed to sugarbeet growers in September.

2014 Sugarbeet Growers Survey 

The 46th annual sugarbeet production practices survey will be mailed to sugarbeet growers in September. This survey is being conducted by the North Dakota State University and University of Minnesota Extension Services under the direction of Tom Peters, Mohamed Khan and Mark Boetel. Sugarbeet growers will be asked questions about various products and practices related to the 2014 sugarbeet crop. We suggest sugarbeet growers may find it helpful to gather their planting and pesticide application records to assist with answering questions.  The survey should take 15 to 20 minutes to complete.  We ask sugarbeet growers to complete and return the survey by December 7, 2014.  Sugarbeet growers, thank you in advance for your help in providing valuable information about your production practices in 2014.  The responses will assist us in shaping our extension and research programs to meet your needs and improve the industry.

Tom Peters

 Extension Sugarbeet Agronomist

NDSU & U of MN

Document Actions
| Share

Fall Nitrogen Application (09/11/14)

Here are my recommendations for North Dakota N application.

Fall Nitrogen Application

Here are my recommendations for North Dakota N application.

For anhydrous ammonia or any significant N source outside of the companion N in MAP or DAP, none should be applied before October 1. After October 1, consult your own soil thermometer and when the soil temperature at 4 inches measured between 6 and 8AM falls to 50 degrees F, it is OK to begin anhydrous ammonia application. This doesn’t guarantee that conversion of significant ammonia to nitrate will not happen, but the risk is low in most years. For banded urea, wait yet another week. For broadcast urea, wait two weeks after the anhydrous ammonia date.

 

Dave Franzen

NDSU Extension Soil Specialist

Document Actions
| Share

Strip-Till Tips (09/11/14)

The number of strip-till users in the Red River Valley continues to grow slowly.

Strip-Till Tips

The number of strip-till users in the Red River Valley continues to grow slowly. A tip from a veteran strip-tiller near Fargo is to follow the combine whenever possible to make sure the strips are made if the soils become wet later in the fall. A strip-till pass in September can be made without fertilizer or with P and K, but not significant N (urea or ammonia). Then at least the strips are made. If the season allows for an N application later, when the calendar and temperature are favorable, go ahead and make the second pass and put it on (although in high loss potential soils, only a base rate is recommended, with side-dress being a significant portion of the total N to be applied).

Dave Franzen

NDSU Extension Soil Specialist

Document Actions
| Share

Deep Sampling for Sugar Beet (09/11/14)

If you are a sugar beet grower (tough year, eh?) and your consultant still has a working 4 foot soil sampler, by all means have them use it.

Deep Sampling for Sugar Beet

If you are a sugar beet grower (tough year, eh?) and your consultant still has a working 4 foot soil sampler, by all means have them use it. Some consultants have a sampler that goes down to 42 inches, and that is good, although not exactly textbook. However, many of the newer soil samplers can only go to about 2 feet. In my work over the years, in fields where good N management has been used over a rotation, credits are taken for beet tops as recommended, and there is no 2nd party that grows potatoes or another crop with wild N application abandon, the levels of nitrate below 2 feet rarely reach above the assumed 30 pounds N per acre. So taking our RRV recommendation for the 2 foot depth would be a valid method of determining rate. If a grower begins to farm new land with only a history of a 2 foot sample, the likelihood of higher nitrate than the 30 pounds per acre assumption would be high. In that case, taking a deeper sample would be justified and I think very important. It is unfortunate that manufacturers do not make a deeper sampling probe for a commercial unit, but there it is. In most cases 2 feet is fine. In new land, knowing deep might mean the difference between profit and loss.

Dave Franzen

NDSU Extension Soil Specialist

Document Actions
| Share

Fall Soil Sampling (09/11/14)

Years ago, there was a formula that NDSU published that offered an adjustment for nitrate levels in soil samples obtained before the end of September.

Fall Soil Sampling

Years ago, there was a formula that NDSU published that offered an adjustment for nitrate levels in soil samples obtained before the end of September. One of the efforts I made when it came time to revisit some recommendations was to go back to the database and see if that formula explained what the data presented. I found that the much of the original data came from periodic sampling through a year across North Dakota. After the first of August sometimes the nitrate stayed the same through the fall, sometimes it went down and sometimes it went up. The direction of up, down or sideways was not related to later rainfall. Faced with the importance of nitrate sampling and that often if a person waits until November for the test to ‘stabilize’ (which really doesn’t happen), the fields can get too wet and the sampling doesn’t happen, I determined that it is best to sample early and make sure you get a number. The real number could change later, but it is impossible to predict how much. But it is better to get a real field number than ‘guess’ at one. I have worked this gig for over 20 years and I can’t out guess it. Sampling is the only way. As soon as the combine goes through the small grain/canola/other early crop, it’s time to sample.

Dave Franzen

NDSU Extension Soil Specialist

Document Actions
Document Actions
Creative Commons License
Feel free to use and share this content, but please do so under the conditions of our Creative Commons license and our Rules for Use. Thanks.