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Promotion/Tenure


Congratulations to all who have received promotion/tenure!

Tom DeSutter, School of Natural Resource Sciences (Soil Science), has been promoted to associate professor with tenure, effective July 1, 2013. The majority of DeSutter’s research focuses on salt- and sodium-affected soils, and finding agricultural uses for industrial byproducts. The objectives of these research thrusts are to improve soil chemical and physical attributes for optimal crop production. DeSutter also works on identifying soil phosphorus and mercury concentrations, and distributions in managed and native systems. Teaching responsibilities include a course in soil and land use and one in environmental field instrumentation and sampling.

Glenn Dorsam, Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences, has been promoted to associate professor with tenure, effective August 16, 2013. Dorsam’s research focuses on understanding how the brain communicates to the immune system. His research group is utilizing an allergic asthma model that has significant clinical human health relevance. Specifically, Dorsam’s laboratory is attempting to better understand how the nervous system biochemically controls the movement and magnitude of immune cells recruited into the lung during allergic asthma. Teaching responsibilities include biochemistry and biochemistry and molecular biology II. He also mentors three graduate students and three undergraduate students.

Harlene Hatterman-Valenti, Department of Plant Sciences, has been promoted to full professor effective July 1, 2013. Hatterman-Valenti’s research goals and initiatives include identifying winter hardy grapes adapted to North Dakota, juneberry research, and work on pest management issues, primarily weed control, for small fruit and vegetable crops. Teaching responsibilities include herbaceous landscape plants and senior seminar (horticulture).

Xinhua Jia, Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, has been promoted to associate professor with tenure, effective July 1, 2013. Jia conducts fundamental research on hydrology and measurement of water balance components including rainfall, snowfall, evapotranspiration, irrigation, drainage, and surface runoff. Her research emphasis is on drainage water management to improve crop production and soil and water quality, which are very important and urgently needed in the Red River Valley of North Dakota and the Upper Midwest of the U.S.  Jia teaches or has taught natural resource management systems, drainage and wetland engineering, and small watershed hydrology and modeling.

Hans Kandel, Extension agronomist in the Department of Plant Sciences, has been promoted to professor with tenure, effective July 1, 2013. Kandel is involved in three major research efforts that contribute to his Extension educational efforts: First, his project team is investigating the effect of tile drainage on wheat, soybean, corn, and canola production at the research site NW 22. The second major effort is researching optimal production practices for soybean production. The third research focus is on the interactions between dry bean varieties, inoculation, nitrogen application and harvest methods.

Sam Markell, Extension Plant Pathologist in the Department of Plant Pathology, has been promoted to associate professor with tenure, effective July 1, 2013. The objectives of Markell’s Extension and research programs are the development and delivery of disease-management strategies for broadleaf crops in North Dakota.  His research focus includes evaluation of genetic, chemical, and cultural disease management tools, survey for exotic pathogens and monitoring for pathogen races changes.  His Extension focus is to provide relevant, economically-viable and timely information to North Dakota producers and the agricultural industry. He has also taught graduate seminar.

Kevin McPhee, Department of Plant Sciences, has been promoted to full professor with tenure, effective July 1, 2013. McPhee’s research focuses on variety development of pulse crops. His work involves genetic enhancement and release of improved varieties of dry pea, lentil and chickpea. Inheritance and genetic control of disease resistance are a primary focus due to the favorable environment in North Dakota for disease development. In addition, due to shifting market strategies, he is working toward development of varieties with improved nutritional attributes. He teaches applied plant breeding and research methods.

Juan Osorno, Department of Plant Sciences, has been promoted to associate professor with tenure, effective July, 1 2013.Osorno is leader of the dry edible bean breeding-genetics project at NDSU. His primary responsibility is to develop improved dry-bean germplasm and cultivars for production in North Dakota by integrating classical and molecular plant breeding and genetics techniques. Pinto, navy, and black market classes are the main focus of the project; however, there is work on other market classes as well. Osorno performs extensive evaluation of germplasm and breeding material for improved seed yield, disease resistance, and other agronomic and quality traits. Teaching responsibilities include genetics, genetics laboratory, and graduate seminar.

Saleem Shaik, Department of Agribusiness and Applied Economics, has been promoted to associate professor with tenure effective August 16, 2013. Shaik’s research focuses on agriculture production, finance and institutional issues. His work involves empirical application to farm level data from 540 farms in 1993-2011 and aggregate data from six Northern Great Plains states from 1933-2010.  He evaluates the importance of production, financial and institutional risks in altering agricultures risk environment in North Dakota, Northern Great Plains states and the U.S. Shaik teaches or has taught agricultural production economics, agricultural finance and analytical methods for applied research for graduates, and applied risk analysis (financial, production and institutional risk) at the undergraduate level.

Senay Simsek, Department of Plant Sciences, has been promoted to associate professor with tenure, effective July 1, 2013. Simsek is in charge of the hard red spring wheat quality laboratories at NDSU. Goals of her program include performing basic and applied research on hard red spring wheat chemistry and functionality in relation to end-product quality. From the wheat quality stand point, she interacts with wheat producers, end-users (both domestic and international), breeders, wheat pathologists and geneticists. Teaching responsibilities include fundamentals of flour testing and baking, carbohydrate chemistry, and advanced food chemistry. 

Shaobin Zhong, Department of Plant Pathology, has been promoted to associate professor with tenure, effective July 1, 2013. Zhong’s research programs focus on molecular plant-fungal interactions and fungal biology. Specifically, he studies resistance and genetics of wheat to Fusarium head blight, population genetics of fungal cereal pathogens (Fusarium graminearum and Cochliobolus sativus), and molecular mechanisms underlying virulence and pathogenicity of fungal pathogens in cereal crops. His teaching responsibilities include advanced mycology and graduate seminar.

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